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BRITISH 
COLUMBIA 

FROM  THE  EARLIEST  TIMES 
TO  THE  PRESENT 


BIOGRAPHICAL 


VOLUME  III 


THE  S.  J.  CLARKE  PUBLISHING  COMPANY 

VANCOUVER      PORTLAND      SAN  FRANCISCO      CHICAGO 
1914 


F 

5820 


V.3 


GEORGE  R.  GORDON 


BIOGRAPHICAL 


GEORGE  ROBERTSON  GORDON. 

George  Robertson  Gordon,  financial  agent  at  Vancouver,  devoting  his  time 
largely  to  his  duties  as  executor  of  several  estates  and  also  to  the  handling  of 
private  interests,  was  born  at  Goderich,  Ontario,  September  i,  1861.  His  par- 
ents, James  and  Mary  Ann  (Gordon)  Gordon,  were  both  natives  of  Ireland,  the 
former  born  in  County  Fermanagh  and  the  latter  in  County  Armagh.  The 
father  learned  the  carpenter's  trade  there  and  in  1855  crossed  the  Atlantic  to  the 
new  world,  becoming  a  resident  of  Goderich,  Ontario,  where  for  thirty-five 
years  he  conducted  business  as  a  contractor.  He  filled  the  offices  of  town 
assessor  and  building  inspector  for  a  number  of  years  and  passed  away  in  Gode- 
rich in  1892,  at  the  age  of  sixty-seven  years.  His  wife  arrived  in  Canada  in  early 
womanhood  and  they  were  married  in  Hamilton.  She  passed  away  a  number  of 
years  before  her  husband,  dying  in  1875,  at  tne  age  of  forty-two. 

At  the  usual  age  George  R.  Gordon  began  his  education  as  a  public-school 
student  in  his  native  city  and  passed  through  consecutive  grades  to  the  high 
school,  from  which  he  was  graduated  before  entering  mercantile  circles  in  1876, 
at  the  age  of  fifteen.  He  was  first  employed  as  a  clerk  in  a  general  store  in  his 
home  town,  spending  his  time  in  that  way  until  1881,  when  he  removed  west- 
ward to  Manitoba.  Owing  to  ill  health  while  in  that  province,  he  soon  returned 
to  the  east  and  remained  in  Ontario  until  1884,  when  he  located  at  Spences 
Bridge,  British  Columbia,  remaining  there  for  a  year.  In  1885  he  embarked 
in  merchandising  at  North  Bend,  British  Columbia,  in  partnership  with  E. 
Johnston,  but  in  the  spring  of  1886  sold  out  to  his  partner  and  came  to  Van- 
couver, which  was  then  a  small  and  unimportant  town,  known  as  Granville. 
Here  he  has  resided  continuously  since  and  with  the  growth  of  the  city  has  been 
closely  associated,  watching  its  development  from  early  days  and  taking  active 
part  in  its  progress.  He  began  merchandising  here  in  March,  1886,  but  was 
burned  out  by  the  fire  which  occurred  on  the  I3th  of  June  of  that  year.  Nothing 
daunted  by  this  calamity,  however,  he  secured  another  stock  of  goods  and  was 
soon  again  engaged  in  business,  in  which  he  continued  until  1900,  winning  a  sub- 
stantial measure  of  success  through  all  the  intervening  years,  for  his  trade 
increased  with  the  growth  of  the  city,  his  straightforward  and  honorable  busi- 
ness methods  securing  him  a  gratifying  patronage.  With  the  opening  year  of  the 
century  he  closed  out  his  business  and  turned  his  attention  to  other  pursuits 
becoming  secretary  of  the  Terminal  City  Building  Society,  the  City  of  Vancouver 
Building  Society  and  the  Burrard  Building  Society,  the  last  named  being  the  only 
one  of  the  three  now  in  existence.  He  resigned  his  position  as  secretary  in  1911 
and  at  the  present  time  is  executor  of  several  estates,  while  his  private  interests  also 
make  large  claim  upon  his  attention  and  energies.  He  is  the  holder  of  much 
valuable  business  and  residential  property  in  Vancouver  and  is  the  owner  of  a 
fine  farm  of  one  hundred  and  twelve  acres  at  Langley,  British  Columbia,  which 
is  devoted  to  the  production  of  fruit,  the  raising  of  stock  and  poultry  and  to 
dairy  interests,  each  branch  of  the  business  bringing  to  him  a  substantial  return. 
His  has  been  a  life  of  unfaltering  energy  and  close  application,  in  which  there 

5\ 


6  BRITISH    COLUMBIA 

have  been  few  leisure  hours,  and  his  wise  utilization  of  his  time  and  talents  has 
brought  him  to  a  most  creditable  and  gratifying  position  among  the  leading  busi- 
ness men  of  the  city. 

Mr.  Gordon  was  married,  in  Clinton,  on  Cariboo  road,  British  Columbia, 
October  18,  1887,  to  Miss  Susan  E.  Mclntyre,  a  daughter  of  John  and  Anna 
(Kilpatrick)  Mclntyre,  both  of  whom  were  natives  of  Stewartstown,  Ireland. 
The  father  died  in  Vancouver  in  June,  1900,  at  the  age  of  eighty-three  years,  and 
Mrs.  Mclntyre  is  still  a  resident  of  this  city.  Although  now  in  her  eightieth 
year,  she  is  still  hale  and  hearty,  retains  her  faculties  unimpaired  and  is  as  alert 
and  active  as  a  person  many  years  her  junior.  Unto  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Gordon  have 
been  born  two  children:  Irmgarde,  who  is  a  graduate  of  the  Vancouver  high 
school  and  the  Ontario  Ladies  College  of  Whitby;  and  Alva  Mclntyre,  who  is 
a  student  at  McGill  University. 

Mr.  Gordon  is  a  conservative  in  politics  and  has  been  an  active  and  stalwart 
advocate  of  party  principles.  He  has  voted  in  every  municipal  election  ever 
held  in  Vancouver  and  for  nine  years  he  was  a  member  of  the  school  board  of 
this  city.  He  became  one  of  the  founders  of  the  Pioneer  Society  of  Vancouver, 
of  which  he  is  now  serving  as  treasurer,  and  no  man  is  more  familiar  with  the 
history  of  development,  progress  and  improvement  here  than  he.  He  holds  mem- 
bership in  Pacific  Lodge,  No.  26,  I.  O.  O.  F.,  in  which  he  has  passed  through  all 
the  chairs,  and  was  grand  representative  to  the  sovereign  grand  lodge  in  1902-03. 
He  is  prominent  and  popular  in  the  club  circles  of  the  city,  connected  through 
membership  with  the  Canadian  and  Progress  Clubs.  Both  he  and  his  wife  are 
active  and  prominent  members  of  Wesley  Methodist  church  and  take  helpful 
interest  in  various  lines  of  church  and  charitable  work.  Mr.  Gordon  is  now  serv- 
ing as  a  member  of  the  board  of  trustees  of  the  Ferris  Road,  Trinity  and  Dundee 
Street  .Methodist  churches.  His  wife  is  active  in  the  Ladies  Aid  Socety  of  the 
Wesley  Methodist  church,  has  been  a  member  of  the  directorate  of  the  Children's 
Aid  Society  for  six  years  and  is  active  in  the  home  work  of  that  organization.  In 
fact,  both  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Gordon  are  possessors  in  large  measure  of  that  broad 
humanitarian  spirit  which  reaches  out  in  helpfulness  and  kindliness  to  all,  and 
their  labors  have  done  much  toward  making  the  world  better  and  brighter  for  the 
unfortunate  ones. 


JOHN    ANDREW    LEE. 

Foremost  along  any  line  of  activity  to  which  he  gave  his  attention,  John 
Andrew  Lee  has  become  one  of  the  substantial  men  and  leading  merchants  of 
New  Westminster,  conducting  one  of  the  largest  department  stores  in  this  city 
and  being  at  the  head  of  numerous  other  important  commercial  and  financial 
institutions.  An  indication  of  the  position  he  holds  in  regard  to  business  develop- 
ment is  given  in  the  fact  that  he  serves  at  present  as  president  of  the  Board  of 
Trade  and,  moreover,  has  held  for  three  terms  the  office  of  mayor  during  a  most 
momentous  period  in  the  history  of  the  city,  promoting  and  bringing  to  realiza- 
tion such  important  measures  as  the  new  harbor  plan  and  the  survey  of  the  city. 
He  was  born  in  Mount  Forest,  Ontario,  on  February  11,  1868,  a  son  of  Samuel 
and  Marjory  (Donogh)  Lee,  the  former  a  native  of  Londonderry,  Ireland,  and 
the  latter  of  County  Sligo,  that  country.  They  were  brought  to  Canada  by  their 
respective  parents  as  boy  and  girl  and  attained  their  majority  in  Ontario,  where 
they  subsequently  married  and  located  in  York  county,  that  province,  the  father 
engaging  in  farming.  He  subsequently  turned  his  attention  to  merchandising, 
with  which  line  he  was  identified  in  later  life.  He  died  in  1883,  highly  esteemed 
and  respected  in  his  community,  his  wife  surviving  him  until  1897.  Both  were 
devout  members  of  the  Methodist  church. 

John  Andrew  Lee  received  his  education  in  the  Toronto  public  schools,  his 
course,  however,  being  cut  short,  as  he  had  to  leave  school  at  the  age  of  thirtee- 


JOHN  A.   LEE 


BRITISH    COLUMBIA  9 

in  order  to  earn  his  own  support.    At  that  early  age  he  secured  a  position  in  the 
dry-goods  store  of  Robert  Simpson  in  Toronto,  a  relationship  which  continued  for 
some   years.      During   that   time   he   rose   through   the   various   departments   in 
the  store  to  an  important  position,  having  at  last  charge  as  manager  of  a  branch  of 
the  business.     In  1890  he  resigned  his  position  in  order  to  come  westward  and 
test  out  the  stories  he  had  heard  about  the  greater  opportunities  of  that  region.    Go- 
ing to  San  Francisco,  California,  he  there  remained  a  little  less  than  a  year  before 
removing  to  Virginia  City,  Nevada,  where  for  nine  months  he  was  employed 
in  a  store,  when  he  was  tendered  a  position  by  Haley  &  Sutton,  the  predeces- 
sors of  Gordon  Drysdale  &  Company.     Haley  &  Sutton  were  organizing  their 
business  at  that  time  and  Mr.   Lee  took  charge  of  the  store   for  them,  this 
being  in  1891.     In  1893  the  nrm  sold  out  to  Gordon  Drysdale  &  Company  and 
Mr.  Lee  then  engaged  in  the  real-estate  and  insurance  business,  remaining  in  that 
line  for  one  year.    In  the  summer  of  1894  he  proceeded  into  the  Lillooet  coun- 
try, where  he  engaged  in  mining.     As  he  expected  to  gain  rapid  success,  he  did 
not  shun  the  hardest  of  work  and  day  by  day  set  out  with  pick  and  shovel  to  seek 
his  fortune.    However,  the  reverse  of  success  was  to  be  his,  this  venture  proving 
only  a  means  of  losing  his  savings.     With  the  coming  of  the  snow  he  came  to 
New  Westminster  to  recuperate  his  fortunes  and  accepted  a  position  with  Alex- 
ander Godfrey,  a  hardware  merchant,  as  bookkeeper,  remaining  in  this  connec- 
tion until  1896,  when  he  returned  to  San  Francisco  to  accept  a  position  in  a  dry- 
goods  house,  which  he  retained  until  1900.    That  year  marks  his  return  to  New 
Westminster  and  subsequently,  in   September,   1903,  Mr.   Lee  bought  out  the 
business  of  the  Standard  Furniture  Company,  devoting  his  attention  to  its  devel- 
opment and  upbuilding.     In  the  following  December,  however,  he  sustained  a 
heavy  loss,  his  store  being  completely  destroyed  by  fire,  but  with  his  character- 
istic spirit  of  energy  he  immediately  set  up  again  in  business,  his  new  place  being 
opened  in  May,  1904.     In  the  following  four  years  his  establishment  expanded 
rapidly  under  his  able  management  and  in  1908  he  was  forced  to  provide  larger 
quarters,  buying  at  that  time  his  present  commodious  business  block.     During 
the  years   1911   and    1912   he  added  dry  goods  and  various  other  departments 
and  has  now  one  of  the  most  modern  and  up-to-date  department  stores  in  New 
Westminster.     In  1912  the  growth  of  the  business  made  it  imperative  to  add 
another  story  to  his  building  and  he  at  the  same  time  renovated  his  place  through- 
out, instituting  numerous  conveniences  for  his  customers  and  making  his  depart- 
ment store  one  which  rivals  any  metropolitan  establishment.     An  indication  of 
the  extensive  business  done  is  given  in  the  fact  that  his  pay  roll  runs  from  eight 
hundred  to  eleven  hundred  dollars  weekly.     His  rapid  success  along  this  line  is 
entirely  attributable  to  his  innate  ability,  his  ready  understanding  of  business 
conditions  and  the  needs  of  the  public,  his  sound  judgment  and  the  honorable 
methods  which  prevail  in  the  store.     Moreover,  he  has  trained  a  force  of  em- 
ployes with  whom  it  is  a  pleasure  to  deal.     It  is  but  a  master  mind  which  in  so 
•  short  a  time  can  create  and  can  successfully  conduct  so  large  an  institution,  and 
Mr.  Lee's  ability  for  organization  is  readily  recognized  in  business  circles,  his 
services  having  been  enlisted  by  numerous  other  enterprises  which  have  largely 
benefited  thereby.    He  serves  at  present  as  president  of  the  Modern  Office  Supply 
Company  of  Vancouver  and  holds  the  same  position  in  relation  to  the  National 
Printing  &  Publishing  Company,  which  publishes  the  New  Westminster  Daily 
News   this  journal  having  largely  benefited  and  increased  in  prestige  by  his  wise 
counsel  and  direction.    He  is  also  president  and  manager  of  the  Dominion  Match 
Company  of  New  Westminster.     He  is  connected  with  other  corporations,  too 
numerous  to  mention,  holding  a  number  of  directorships  on  various  boards.     _ 

In  1897  Mr   Lee  was  united  in  marriage  to  Miss  Mildred  Major,  a  daughter 
of  C.  G.  Major,  of  New  Westminster,  and  to  them  have  been  born  two  chile 
Dorothy  Mildred  and  John  Ormsby. 

That  a  man  of  the  ability  and  characteristics  such  as  Mr.  Lee  possessess 
should  become  closely  connected  with  the  public  life  of  his  community  is  but 
natural,  and  it  may  be  said  of  him  that  along  official  lines  he  has  done  work  ot  at 


10  BRITISH    COLUMBIA 

least  equal  importance.  For  three  terms,  beginning  in  1910,  he  served  as  mayor 
of  New  Westminster,  promoting  during  that  time  some  of  the  most  important 
measures  undertaken  in  the  interests  of  the  city.  He  may  be  called  the  father 
of  the  ordinance  which  provided  for  the  resurveying  of  the  city  and  it  was  he 
who  initiated  and  fostered  the  new  harbor  plan  which  will  give  to  New  West- 
minster one  of  the  finest  and  most  capacious  harbors  on  the  Pacific  coast.  His 
political  affiliation  is  with  the  conservative  party  and  his  interest  and  standing  in 
the  organization  is  evident  by  the  fact  that  he  serves  at  present  as  president  of 
the  Conservative  Association  of  British  Columbia.  He  is  also  president  of  the 
Union  of  Municipalities  of  British  Columbia  and  holds  the  same  important  posi- 
tion in  relation  to  the  Board  of  Trade,  in  which  he  always  can  be  found  in  the 
front  ranks  of  those  who  leave  no  stone  unturned  to  promote  industrial  and  com- 
mercial expansion.  He  is  a  member  of  the  Westminster  Club,  of  the  Burnaby 
Lake  Country  Club  and  the  British  Columbia  Golf  and  Country  Club  at  Coquit- 
lam,  the  two  latter  connections  giving  an  indication  of  his  means  of  recreation 
and  relaxation.  He  is  prominent  in  the  Masonic  order,  being  a  member  of  King 
Solomon  Lodge,  No.  17,  A.  F.  &  A.  M. ;  Westminster  Chapter,  R.  A.  M. ;  West- 
minster Preceptory;  and  Gizeh  Temple,  A.  A.  O.  N.  M.  S.,  of  Victoria.  To 
estimate  the  value  of  the  labors  of  Mr.  Lee  in  their  effect  upon  the  advancement 
and  development  of  New  Westminster  is  practically  impossible,  but  that  he  has 
been  among  the  foremost  forces  to  bring  about  the  present  prosperous  conditions 
is  readily  conceded  by  all.  He  is  highly  respected  and  honored  in  his  community, 
as  he  is  a  man  who  has  not  only  striven  for  individual  success  but  has  given  as 
much  time  and  thought  to  promote  general  measures  which  have  proven  of  the 
utmost  benefit  to  the  general  public. 


THOMAS  FRANK  PATERSON. 

One  of  the  successful  and  prominent  men  in  Vancouver  at  the  pres- 
ent time  and  one  whose  personality,  executive  ability  and  sound  judgment  have 
been  felt  as  forces  in  the  development  and  upbuilding  of  the  city's  commercial 
interests  is  Thomas  Frank  Paterson,  president  and  manager  of  the  Paterson  Tim- 
ber Company,  Ltd.  He  was  born  in  Thamesford,  Ontario,  on  the  i9th  of  No- 
vember, 1867,  and  is  a  son  of  Alexander  and  Agnes  Paterson,  pioneers  in  Mid- 
dlesex county,  Ontario,  and  also  early  settlers  in  Bruce  county,  in  the  same  prov- 
ince. They  have  now  for  a  number  of  years  made  their  home  m  Vancouver. 

Thomas  Frank  Paterson  acquired  his  education  in  the  public  schools  of  Bruce 
county  and  in  the  high  schools  at  Goderich  and  Clinton,  Ontario,  and  after  lay-' 
ing  aside  his  books  taught  in  the  schools  of  Bruce  county  from  1888  to  1892.  He 
later  attended  Guelph  Agricultural  College  and  from  that  institution  went  to 
Toronto  University,  graduating  in  1896,  with  the  degree  of  B.  S.  A.  and  receiv- 
ing the  highest  honors  in  his  class,  acting  as  valedictorian.  In  the  fall  of  1896 
he  lectured  for  the  British  Columbia  government  on  agriculture  and  upon  the 
formation  and  maintenance  of  a  series  of  farmers'  institutes  throughout  the 
province,  similar  to  those  then  in  profitable  existence  in  Ontario.  He  was  after- 
ward on  the  editorial  staff  of  the  Vancouver  World,  serving  from  1897  to  1898, 
and  in  the  fall  of  the  latter  year  purchased  a  one-third  interest  in  the  Canadian 
Pacific  Lumber  Company,  Ltd.,  of  Port  Moody.  In  1962  he  and  his  brother, 
W.  Innes  Paterson,  formed  the  Paterson  Timber  Company,  Ltd.,  of  Vancouver. 
Of  this  firm  Thomas  F.  Paterson  is  now  president  and  managing  director.  In 
association  with  his  brother,  W.  I.  Paterson,  he  also  purchased  in  1907  the  plant 
of  the  Cascade  Mills,  Ltd.,  and  he  is  also  president  of  this  concern.  In  addition 
to  this  he  is  president  and  managing  director  of  the  Terminal  Lumber  &  Shingle 
Company,  Ltd.,  of  Vancouver.  He  is  vice  president  of  the  Burrard  Publishing 
Company,  Ltd.,  publishers  of  the  Vancouver  Sun,  and  a  director  in  the  Forest 
Mills,  Ltd.,  of  British  Columbia,  and  in  the  Colonial  Pulp  &  Paper  Company, 


THOMAS  F.  PATERSON 


BRITISH    COLUMBIA  13 

Ltd.,  these  connections  indicating  something  of  the  scope  and  extent  of  his 
interests  and  of  his  high  standing  in  business  circles  of  the  community. 

On  the  ist  of  October,  1902,  Mr.  Paterson  married,  in  New  Westminster, 
British  Columbia,  Miss  Mary  Olive  Tait,  a  daughter  of  the  late  T.  B.  and  Eva 
Tait,  the  former  at  one  time  a  prominent  lumberman  in  Burks  Falls,  Ontario, 
where  he  controlled  the  business  operated  by  the  T.  B.  Tait  Lumber  Company. 
Mr.  and  Mrs.  Paterson  have  four  children,  Evelyn,  Gladys,  Ethelwyn  and  Phyllis. 

Mr.  Paterson  is  a  member  of  the  Presbyterian  church  and  fraternally  is  affili- 
ated with  the  Masonic  order  and  the  Independent  Order  of  Odd  Fellows.  He 
is  a  liberal  in  his  political  beliefs  and  is  affiliated  with  the  Vancouver  Commer- 
cial Club,  being  ready  at  all  times  to  cooperate  in  any  movement  for  the  promo- 
tion of  the  commercial  growth  of  the  city.  He  has  resided  in  British  Columbia 
for  the  past  sixteen  years  and  has  been  during  most  of  that  time  one  of  the  great 
individual  forces  in  the  business  development  of  Vancouver,  for  the  influence 
of  his  personality  and  his  unusual  ability  have  been  felt  as  a  community  asset 
as  well  as  a  factor  in  his  individual  prosperity.  He  holds  the  respect  of  his 
business  associates,  the  warm  regard  of  his  friends  and  the  confidence  and  esteem 
of  all  who  are  in  any  way  associated  with  him. 


JAMES  FORD  GARDEN. 

James  Ford  Garden,  a  widely  known  representative  of  the  profession  of  civil 
engineering,  practicing  in  Vancouver,  where  he  has  also  other  interests  of  a 
varied  nature  has  made  his  home  in  this  province  since  1886.  He  is  a  native 
of  Woodstock,  New  Brunswick,  born  February  19,  1847,  and  is  a  son  of  H.  M. 
G.  and  E.  Jane  (Gale)  Garden,  representatives  of  old  United  Empire  Loyalist 
families.  In  1894  he  was  elected  a  member  of  the  Canadian  Society  of  Civil 
Engineers.  Mr.  Garden,  who  was  a  lieutenant  in  the  Intelligence  Corps  in  the 
Northwest  rebellion  in  1875  was  wounded  at  Batoche,  and  received  a  medal.  He 
is  likewise  much  interested  in  the  political  situation  of  the  country  and  with 
local  interests  and  in  1898  was  elected  mayor  of  Vancouver  for  a  three  years' 
term.  In  his  political  affiliation  he  is  a  conservative  and  sat  for  Vancouver  City 
in  the  local  legislature  from  1900  until  1909.  In  the  former  year  he  unsuccess- 
fully contested  Vancouver  for  a  seat  in  the  house  of  commons  at  the  general 
election.  His  religious  belief  is  that  of  the  Anglican  church. 


GEORGE  EDWARD  TROREY. 

George  Edward  Trorey,  who  has  been  engaged  in  the  jewelry  business  at 
Vancouver  for  a  period  covering  two  decades,  now  conducts  the  third  largest 
jewelry  establishment  in  Canada  as  managing  director  of  the  Vancouver  branch 
of  the' firm  of  Henry  Birks  &  Sons.  His  birth  occurred  at  Niagara  Falls,  On- 
tario, Canada,  on  the  22d  of  March,  1861,  and  in  the  public  schools  of  that  place 
he  acquired  his  education.  After  putting  aside  his  text-books  he  was  apprenticed 
to  John  England,  of  Niagara  Falls,  to  learn  the  trade  of  watchmaker  and  jeweler 
and  remained  with  that  gentleman  for  about  six  years.  On  the  expiration  of 
that  period  he  went  to  Meaford,  Ontario,  and  there  followed  the  trade  of 
watchmaker  for  two  years.  Making  his  way  to  Toronto,  he  there  worked  at  his 
trade  in  charge  of  the  watch  repairing  department  of  the  firm  of  C.  &  J.  Allen. 
In  1886  he  embarked  in  business  on  his  own  account  as  a  retail  jeweler  of  To- 
ronto, remaining  in  that  city  until  February,  1893,  when  he  came  to  Vancouver. 
Here  he  successfully  continued  in  business  until  1907,  when  he  amalgamated  his 
interests  with  those  of  Henry  Birks  &  Sons  of  Montreal,  becoming  managing  di- 


14  BRITISH    COLUMBIA 

rector  of  the  Vancouver  branch,  which  office  he  has  held  to  the  present  time. 
When  he  began  business  at  Vancouver  in  February,  1893,  he  had  a  very  small 
store  on  Cordova  street  and  one  assistant.  The  success  which  attended  his  efforts 
is  indicated  in  the  fact  that  when  he  joined  forces  with  Henry  Birks  &  Sons  he 
was  already  established  in  his  present  location  and  had  about  thirty-five  em- 
ployes. He  now  conducts  the  third  largest  jewelry  business  in  Canada  and  the 
largest  west  of  Toronto,  furnishing  employment  to  more  than  one  hundred  people. 
The  business  of  Henry  Birks  was  founded  in  Montreal  in  March,  1879,  and  con- 
ducted in  a  very  small  store  at  No.  224  St.  James  street.  In  1893  Mr.  Birks 
admitted  his  three  sons  to  a  partnership  and  the  enterprise  has  since  been  known 
as  Henry  Birks  &  Sons,  under  which  style  stores  are  conducted  at  Montreal, 
Toronto,  Ottawa,  Winnipeg  and  Vancouver.  As  managing  director  of  the  Van- 
couver branch  Mr.  Trorey  has  demonstrated  his  executive  ability  and  sound  busi- 
ness sense,  and  the  success  which  has  come  to  him  is  indeed  well  merited. 


ROBERT  KERR  HOULGATE. 

In  financial  and  industrial  circles  the  name  of  Robert  Kerr  Houlgate,  of  Van- 
couver, is  well  known  and  his  business  is  of  an  extensive  and  important  character. 
He  was  born  at  Whitehaven,  England,  September  n,  1868,  and  is  a  son  of  William 
and  Jessie  <M.  (Kerr)  Houlgate.  The  father  was  a  banker  of  Whitehaven,  re- 
maining for  about  half  a  century  as  manager  of  the  Cumberland  Union  Bank  of 
that  place,  his  labors  in  that  connection  being  terminated  by  his  death  in  1903.  He 
was  for  many  years  a  captain  in  the  volunteer  artillery  and  held  many  positions 
of  trust  and  honor  of  a  public  or  semi-public  character.  In  fact,  he  was  one  of  the 
leading  and  influential  residents  of  his  community,  his  worth  and  ability  being 
widely  acknowledged. 

Robert  K.  Houlgate  was  educated  at  Ghyll  Bank  College,  at  Whitehaven,  Eng- 
land, and  throughout  his  entire  life  has  been  more  or  less  closely  connected  with 
financial  interests.  When  his  text-books  were  laid  aside  he  entered  the  employ  of 
the  Cumberland  Union  Bank  at  Whitehaven  in  the  capacity  of  clerk  and  was  ad- 
vanced through  various  grades  in  that  bank  and  other  financial  institutions  until 
1894,  when  he  became  manager  of  the  London  City  and  Midland  Bank,  Limited, 
at  Morley,  Yorkshire,  England.  He  continued  there  until  1898,  when  he  came  to 
Vancouver,  British  Columbia,  to  accept  the  position  of  assistant .  manager  for 
British  Columbia  of  the  Yorkshire  Guarantee  and  Securities  Corporation,  Lim- 
ited, of  Huddersfield,  England.  Within  the  year  he  became  manager  and  so  con- 
tinues to  the  present  time,  controlling  and  directing  the  important  interests  of  that 
company  in  this  province.  This  corporation  which  is  capitalized  for  two  million, 
five  hundred  thousand  dollars,  established  its  branch  in  Vancouver  in  1890.  They 
are  a  mortgage  company  and  do  a  general  financial  and  investment  business,  buy 
and  sell  municipal  bonds,  manage  estates  and  act  as  trustees  and  executors.  They 
also  buy  and  sell  for  clients  vacant  and  improved  properties  in  Vancouver.  Vic- 
toria and  New  Westminster.  In  1908  Mr.  Houlgate  as  manager  of  the  Yorkshire 
Guarantee  and  Securities  Corporation,  Limited,  became  general  agent  for  British 
Columbia  for  the  Yorkshire  Insurance  Company,  Limited,  of  York,  England,  rep- 
resenting fire,  employers'  liability,  accident,  plate  glass  and  live-stock  insurance  and 
so  continues  to  date.  Mr.  Houlgate  is  also  general  investment  agent  for  the  com- 
pany in  the  province  and  in  this  connection  he  is  conducting  a  large  and  rapidly 
growing  business.  They  have  extensive,  safe  and  conservative  investments  in  the 
province  which  Mr.  Houlgate  has  placed  for  them.  He  is  also  agent  for  the  Home 
Insurance  Company  of  New  York,  representing  fire  and  automobile  insurance; 
agent  for  the  Vancouver  Land  and  Improvement  Company,  Limited;  the  Van- 
couver Land  and  Securities  Corporation,  Limited;  the  estate  of  Isaac  Robinson; 
the  estate  of  Town  and  Robinson,  and  also  has  other  financial  interests.  He  is 
likewise  president  of  the  Mainland  Transfer  Company  of  Vancouver  and  of  the 


ROBERT  K.  HOULGATE 


BRITISH    COLUMBIA  17 

Pacific  May-Oatway  Fire  Alarms,  Limited,  of  Vancouver.  He  is  also  an  officer 
of  a  number  of  corporations  subsidiary  to  the  Yorkshire  Guarantee  and  Securi- 
ties Corporation,  Limited,  and  he  has  valuable  real-estate  holdings.  What  he  has 
undertaken  and  successfully  accomplished  places  him  among  the  foremost 
financiers  and  business  men  of  the  province  and  his  efforts  have  been  of  a 
character  which  have  promoted  public  prosperity  as  well  as  individual  success. 

Mr.  Houlgate  has  taken  an  active  part  in  all  matters  pertaining  to  the  growth 
and  development  of  Vancouver  and  British  Columbia  since  coming  to  the  new 
world.  He  is  interested  in  everything  pertaining  to  civic  welfare  and  his  efforts 
have  been  resultant  factors  along  many  lines  of  benefit  to  his  adopted  city.  He 
was  a  director  of  the  old  Tourist's  Association,  which  was  absorbed  into  the 
Progress  Club  and  which  did  much  for  Vancouver,  exploiting  its  resources  and 
advantages  and  making  known  its  opportunities  and  its  possibilities.  His  pub- 
licity work  has  been  resultant  and  Vancouver  has  every  reason  to  number  him 
among  her  builders  and  promoters. 

On  the  3 ist  of  January,  1906,  Mr.  Houlgate  was  married  in  Vancouver  to 
Miss  Mabel  G.  Willox,  a  native  of  Herne  Bay,  England,  and  a  daughter  of  Thomas 
and  Mary  Willox.  In  politics  Mr.  Houlgate  is  a  conservative  but  not  an  active 
party  worker.  He  belongs  to  the  Vancouver  and  Vancouver  Royal  Yacht  Clubs  of 
Vancouver,  the  Westminster  Club  at  New  Westminster,  the  Union  Club  of  Vic- 
toria and  the  United  Empire  Club  of  London,  England.  It  is  an  acknowledged 
fact  that  he  occupies  a  central  place  on  the  stage  of  business  activity  and  all  con- 
cede that  merit  has  won  him  the  laurels  which  he  has  gained. 


HENRY  ALFRED  EASTMAN. 

Not  only  has  Henry  Alfred  Eastman  played  an  important  part  in  the  de- 
velopment of  New  Westminster  as  director  of  the  F.  J.  Hart  Company,  Ltd., 
and  of  the  Western  Home  &  Improvement  Company,  Ltd.,  but  was  a  dominant 
factor  in  the  development  of  the  Fraser  river  valley  in  the  early  days  when  he 
drove  many  farmers  from  the  east  through  this  section,  demonstrating  the  feasi- 
bility of  its  agricultural  riches  and  giving  proof  of  the  suitability  of  the  land  for 
cultivation.  Most  of  the  men  who  first  came  to  this  region  labored  under  the 
impression  that  for  nine  months  or  more  of  the  year  continuous  rains  effectively 
prevented  successful  agriculture  and  it  was  he  who  drove  these  doubters  through 
the  countryside,  convincing  them  of  the  advantages  which  could  be  gained  here. 
Many  a  day  while  thus  engaged  he  drove  from  twenty-five  to  forty  miles  per 
day  and  it  may  be  said  of  him  that  there  has  been  no  man  who  has  done  more 
in  bringing  settlers  to  the  Fraser  river  valley  than  Mr.  Eastman. 

Born  in  Stormont  county,  Ontario,  on  December  15,  1856,  Henry  Alfred 
Eastman  is  a  son  of  Alva  Schofield  and  Sarah  (Johnstone)  Eastman,  the  father 
having  been  born  in  the  same  house  as  his  son  Henry  A.  The  grandfather, 
Benjamin  Eastman,  crossed  the  border  from  Connecticut  to  the  Dominion  as  a 
refugee  on  account  of  the  breaking  out  of  the  War  for  Independence,  and  the 
mother  was  born  on  the  farm  adjoining  the  Eastman  homestead  in  Ontario. 
Both  father  and  mother  passed  their  entire  lives  in  that  province. 

Henry  Alfred  Eastman  was  reared  at  home  amid  influences  conducive  to  the 
development  of  the  highest  qualities  of  manhood,  early  haying  instilled  into  his 
youthful  consciousness  lessons  concerning  the  value  of  thrift,  diligence,  honesty 
and  modesty.  In  the  acquirement  of  his  education  he  attended  the  common 
schools  of  the  neighborhood  and  Belleville  College  at  Belleville  City,  Ontario,  work- 
ing, however,  previous  to  his  college  course,  in  a  general  store  at  Mille  Roches, 
that  province,  and  accepting,  after  completing  his  studies,  a  position  in  a  retail 
grocery  house  in  Toronto.  Four  years  later  he  was  offered  and  accepted  a  posi- 
tion as  foreman  and  wholesale  salesman  in  the  wholesale  grocery  house  of 
Kinnear  &  Lang,  with  whom  he  remained  for  two  years,  at  the  end  of  which 


18  BRITISH    COLUMBIA 

time  he  engaged  independently  in  the  retail  grocery  business  under  the  firm 
name  of  H.  A.  Eastman  &  Company,  in  Toronto,  and  was  for  thirteen  years 
prominently  and  successfully  identified  with  the  grocery  business  in  that  city. 
Disposing  of  his  interests  he  sought  the  opportunities  of  the  west  and  on  April 
3,  1891,  arrived  in  Vancouver,  but  two  months  later  he  came  to  New  Westminster 
where  he  engaged  in  the  brokerage  business  with  others  under  the  firm  style  of 
E.  H.  Port  &  Company,  remaining  in  that  connection  until  three  years  later, 
when  the  association  was  dissolved.  In  1896  he  identified  himself  with  F.  J. 
Hart  &  Company,  Ltd.,  with  which  concern  he  has  since  been  connected.  He  is 
director  of  this  important  organization  and  holds  a  similar  office  in  connection 
with  the  Western  Home  &  Improvement  Company,  Ltd.  His  executive  ability 
and  business  capacity  have  found  a  wide  scope  in  these  important  connections 
and  the  thriving  conditions  which  both  firms  enjoy  are  in  no  small  way  due  to 
the  effective  work  of  Mr.  Eastman. 

In  the  city  of  Toronto,  in  1880,  Mr.  Eastman  was  united  in  marriage  to  Miss 
Fannie  Russell,  by  whom  he  has  six  children:  Bessie  Gray,  the  wife  of  Henry 
J.  Byrnes,  a  farmer  of  Langley  Prairie ;  William  Russell,  residing  in  San  Diego, 
California;  Emma  Gertrude,  who  married  Thomas  D.  Curtis,  a  building  con- 
tractor of  New  Westminster ;  Grace  Irene,  the  wife  of  Rupert  Haggan,  Dominion 
and  provincial  land  surveyor  at  Quesnel,  British  Columbia ;  Edwin  Fraser,  senior 
member  of  the  firm  of  Eastman  &  Wahnsley,  brokers ;  and  Edna  Sarah,  still 
at  home. 

Mr.  Eastman  and  his  family  are  devoted  members  of  the  Church  of  England. 
As  a  member  of  the  New  Westminster  Board  of  Trade  he  associates  with  those 
men  who  have  at  heart  the  real  progress  of  the  city  and  are  ever  ready  to  give 
their  support  to  enterprises  which  give  promise  of  permanent  value.  He  is  also 
a  member  of  the  Westminster  Club  and  the  Westminster  Progressive  Association. 
Fraternally  he  is  connected  with  St.  George's  Lodge  of  the  Grand  Registry  of 
Canada,  and  belongs  also  to  Lewis  Lodge,  No.  57,  A.  F.  &  A.  M.  While  he  has 
never  cared  for  public  position  he  has  in  a  private  capacity  done  much  toward 
material  growth  and  is  ever  ready  to  uphold  such  measures  as  will  promote  in- 
tellectual and  moral  progress.  He  is  highly  respected  and  esteemed  in  the  city 
not  only  for  the  substantial  position  he  has  attained  among  its  citizens  but  as 
much  for  those  qualities  of  his  character  which  have  made  possible  his  success — 
a  success  which  lies  as  much  in  civic  righteousness  as  in  financial  independence. 


WILLIAM  CHARLES. 

William  Charles,  Pacific  coast  pioneer,  Hudson's  Bay  Company  factor,  scholar, 
artist,  prominent  figure  in  the  early  history  of  British  Columbia  and  one  of  the 
"trail  blazers"  who  marked  the  way  for  later  civilization  and  development,  was 
a  native  of  Scotland,  born  at  Inverleith  Row,  Edinburgh,  March  5,  1831,  the  son 
of  John  Charles,  one  of  the  early  factors  of  the  Hudson's  Bay  Company. 

William  Charles  was  educated  at  Hill  Street  School  and  Edinburgh  University, 
having  there  laid  the  foundation  of  a  later  broad  education  and  a  culture  which 
was  characteristic  of  the  man  throughout  his  subsequent  career. 

He  came  to  the  Pacific  coast  from  Edinburgh  by  way  of  Panama  in  1852,  and 
was  for  a  time  in  the  employ  of  Breck  &  Ogden  of  Portland,  Oregon,  and  two 
years  later,  or  in  1854,  entered  the  service  of  the  Hudson's  Bay  Company.  He 
was  stationed  at  different  times  at  old  Fort  Vancouver  on  the  Columbia  River, 
Fort  Hall,  Utah,  and  at  Fort  Boise.  He  was  transferred  to  Victoria  in  1858  and 
was  subsequently  in  charge  of  Fort  Hope,  Fort  Yale  and  Fort  Kamloops. 

In  1874  he  was  promoted  to  the  grade  of  chief  factor  and  placed  in  charge 
of  the  Victoria  establishment.  He  is  mentioned  very  kindly  by  Bancroft,  the 
historian  of  the  Pacific  coast,  for  having  contributed  much  valuable  data  respect- 
ing Oregon  and  British  Columbia,  and  his  name  also  appears  frequently  in  the 


BRITISH    COLUMBIA  21 

old  Hudson's  Bay  correspondence,  which  has  been  collected  and  preserved  in 
the  British  Columbia  Provincial  Library. 

Later,  in  1874,  he  was  made  inspecting  chief  factor  of  the  western  department, 
an  important  post,  including  in  its  jurisdiction  all  the  Hudson's  Bay  establish- 
ments in  and  west  of  the  Rocky  mountains,  retaining  this  position  up  to  the 
time  of  his  retirement  in  1885,  thereafter  residing  permanently  in  Victoria  to 
the  time  of  his  death,  which  occurred  May  21,  1903,  in  his  seventy-third  year. 
He  was  of  the  old  stock  of  the  Hudson's  Bay  Company,  dating  far  back  in 
the  history  of  that  remarkable  and  powerful  organization.  As  before  mentioned, 
his  father  was  a  chief  factor,  having  been  identified  with  the  company's  opera- 
tions in  Rupert's  Land.  His  name  appears  among  the  members  of  the  Hudson's 
Bay  councils,  which  may  properly  be  regarded  as  "fur  trading  parliaments," — at 
Red  River  in  1835  and  1839,  and  again  at  Norway  House  in  1840,  at  the  first 
of  which  the  late  Duncan  Finlayson  presided,  and  at  the  latter  two  of  which 
Sir  George  Simpson  was  the  presiding  officer.  It  is  also  affirmed  that  his  mother 
and  William  Charles'  grandmother,  was  the  daughter  of  one  of  the  high  offi- 
cials at  Fort  York  or  Churchill  on  Hudson's  Bay  at  the  time  of  the  French 
invasion,  at  which  time  she  was  taken  a  prisoner  to  France  but  subsequently 
released. 

Although  William  Charles  did  not  participate  prominently  in  public  affairs 
and  was  comparatively  unknown  to  the  younger  generation,  to  those  who  knew 
him  well  in  early  days  and  who  had  business  or  social  intercourse  with  him,  he 
appealed  most  strongly,  and  the  warm  ties  of  friendship  were  never  broken. 

His  name  was  a  synonym  for  honor  and  personal  integrity.  In  his  official 
capacity,  his  duties  were  performed  with  that  competency  and  conscientious- 
ness which  constituted  the  character  of  the  man,  bringing  to  both  his  business 
and  social  activities  acute  intelligence  and  wide  knowledge. 

He  was  a  man  of  fine  artistic  taste,  and  many  of  his  sketches  portrayed,  not 
only  the  promise  of  high  accomplishment  as  an  artist,  but  illustrate  in  an  origin- 
ally clever  way  the  many  phases  of  fur  trading  life  of  the  frontier  wilds.  He 
was  a  close  student  and  wide  reader,  with  a  fondness  for  natural  science,  with 
a  particular  liking  for  natural  history,  and  owned  one  of  the  most  carefully 
selected  libraries  in  the  province.  Had  he  been  so  disposed  he  could  have  left 
very  interesting  historical  and  literary  reminiscences,  but  like  so  many  of  his 
contemporaries  who  were  so  splendidly  equipped  by  mentality,  education  and 
experience,  owing  to  the  more  practical  turn  which  trading  life  gave,  he  was 
indifferent  to  the  opportunities  which  lay  before  him  in  that  direction,  and  on 
account  of  which  all  students  of  western  pioneer  life  must  deeply  regret.  As 
a  man,  however,  he  preferred  a  life  of  quiet  retirement,  whose  allegiance  was 
to  his  old  friends,  endeared  to  them  as  he  was  by  sterling  qualities  of  heart  and 
mind. 

Physically,  he  was  in  his  prime,  vigorous,  powerful,  capable,  of  great  endur- 
ance and  wonderful  feats  of  travel  which  seem  almost  unbelievable  in  this  day  of 
modern  facilities.  In  talking  of  the  hardships  of  reaching  the  Yukon,  he  used 
to  laugh  at  the  stories  of  some  of  the  "tenderfeet"  of  later  days.  On  one 
occasion  while  at  Fort  Vancouver  upon  the  arrival  of  a  ship  he  was  ordered  to 
report  to  Fort  York,  and  on  four  days'  notice  undertook  the  journey  going  up 
the  Columbia  river,  past  the  present  site  of  Revelstoke,  thence  up  the  Canoe 
river  and  through  Yellowhead  Pass,  out  to  the  plains,  whence  he  took  the  Sas- 
katchewan, and  so  on  to  his  journey's  end.  These  were  the  common,  and  not 
the  uncommon  experiences  of  the  rugged  life  led  by  Hudson's  Bay  men,  which 
few  men  would  undertake  or  undergo  at  the  present  day  with  improved  modes 
of  travel. 

On  October  3,  1859,  Mr-  Charles  married  Mary  Ann  Birnie,  a  native  of 
Astoria,  Oregon,  and  a  daughter  of  James  Birnie,  at  one  time  identified  with  the 
Hudson's  Bay  Company,  but  subsequently  severed  his  connection  and  took  up 
government  land  on  the  Columbia  river  at  Cathlamet,  Oregon,  where  he  de- 
voted the  remainder  of  his  life,  and  died  on  the  farm  thus  established. 


22  BRITISH    COLUMBIA 

Mr.  Charles  was  survived  by  Mrs.  Charles,  two  daughters  and  a  son:  Mrs. 
Eberts,  wife  of  the  Hon.  David  M.  Eberts,  K.  C.,  former  attorney  general  of 
British  Columbia;  Mrs.  Worsfold,  wife  of  C.  Worsfold,  superintendent  of  the 
Dominion  public  works  department  at  New  Westminster ;  and  William  B.  Charles, 
of  Kamloops,  British  Columbia. 

Mrs.  Charles  possesses  to  a  remarkable  degree  those  charming  traits  of  mind 
and  character  with  which  her  husband  was  so  liberally  endowed  and  which 
endeared  them  both  to  their  hosts  of  friends.  Her  social  life,  while  most 
unostentatious,  is  a  pleasure  and  a  joy  to  both  her  friends  and  to  herself.  Mr. 
Charles'  death  marked  the  parting  of  another  link  in  the  chain  of  hardy  pioneers 
whose  lives  and  work  unite  the  past  with  the  present  and  whose  sterling  integrity, 
industry  and  faith  in  the  future,  contributed  so  much  to  the  present  well-being 
and  prosperity  of  the  province  of  British  Columbia  and  added  so  much  of  credit 
to  its  history. 


GEORGE  JOHN  HAMMOND. 

George  John  Hammond  is  president  of  the  Natural  Resources  Security  Com- 
pany, Ltd.,  and  as  such  is  active  among  those  who  have  been  exploiting  the 
interests  and  opportunities  of  this  great  and  growing  western  country.  His 
efforts  have  been  resultant  in  the  upbuilding  of  various  districts  in  British  Colum- 
bia and  he  brings  to  his  task  the  most  enterprising  business  methods,  guided  by 
sound  judgment  and  keen  discernment.  He  was  born  January  15,  1866,  at  Port 
Dover,  Ontario,  his  parents  being  Edward  and  Priscilla  (Long)  Hammond.  The 
father  came  of  English  ancestry  while  the  mother's  people  were  of  United 
Empire  Loyalist  stock  from  Virginia.  In  the  public  schools  of  his  native  city 
the  son  pursued  his  education  and  crossed  the  threshold  of  the  business  world  as 
a  drug  clerk  at  Port  Dover,  Ontario,  while  later  he  was  employed  in  a  similar 
capacity  at  Hagersville,  Ontario.  He  next  became  station  agent  at  different 
points  along  the  Canadian  Southern  Railway  and  from  1882  until  1884  was 
train  dispatcher  for  the  Chicago,  Milwaukee  &  St.  Paul  Railway  Company  at 
Milwaukee,  Wisconsin.  On  leaving  that  service  he  entered  the  employ  of  the 
Western  Union  Telegraph  and  Postal  Telegraph  Cable  Companies  which  he  rep- 
resented from  1884  until  1890.  Through  the  succeeding  decade  he  was  a  mem- 
ber of  the  St.  Louis  (Mo.)  Board  of  Trade  and  of  the  Merchants  Exchange  and 
following  his  removal  to  Minneapolis  in  1900  he  engaged  in  the  brokerage  busi- 
ness in  Minneapolis  and  St.  Paul  for  six  years. 

Mr.  Hammond  arrived  in  British  Columbia  in  1906  and  has  since  been  iden- 
tified with  projects  and  business  enterprises  which  have  had  much  to  do  with 
the  development  and  upbuilding  of  the  northwest.  From  1907  until  1909  he 
was  the  vice  president  of  the  Kootenai  Orchard  Association  at  Nelson,  British 
Columbia,  and  is  still  one  of  its  stockholders.  The  latter  year  the  Natural  Re- 
sources Security  Company  was  organized  and  Mr.  Hammond  was  appointed 
president  and  managing  director,  which  offices  he  still  holds.  The  name  indi- 
cates something  of  the  nature  and  scope  of  his  business  and  in  this  connection 
Mr.  Hammond  is  indeed  proving  a  factor  in  the  development  of  this  section  of 
the  country.  In  1909  he  became  the  founder  of  the  city  of  Fort  George,  British 
Columbia,  which  he  believes  is  destined  to  become  one  of  the  largest  cities  in  the 
west  because  of  its  favorable  location  and  the  many  natural  resources  of  that 
part  of  the  country.  He  is  now  serving  as  a  member  of  the  Fort  George  Board 
of  Trade  and  is  also  a  member  of  the  Fort  George  Club.  He  is  likewise  a  mem- 
ber of  the  Vancouver  Board  of  Trade  and  cooperates  in  all  of  its  projects  and 
plans  for  the  promotion  of  municipal  interests. 

On  the  1 3th  of  March,  1906,  at  Sault  Ste.  Marie,  Ontario,  Mr.  Hammond 
was  united  in  marriage  to  Miss  Margaret  Cameron,  a  daughter  of  James  T.  and 
Mary  F.  Cameron,  Scotch  Highlanders  from  Prince  Edward  Island.  Mr.  and 


GEORGE  J.  HAMMOND 


BRITISH    COLUMBIA  25 

Mrs.  Hammond  have  one  child,  Robert  Cameron  Howard.  The  political  faith 
of  Mr.  Hammond  is  that  of  the  conservative  party  and  his  religious  belief  is  that 
of  the  Presbyterian  church.  He  belongs  to  the  Progress  Club  of  Vancouver 
and  enjoys  its  social  features  as  well  as  its  carefully  planned  efforts  to  promote 
the  city's  interests.  His  life  has  ever  been  actuated  by  the  spirit  of  advancement 
and  with  a  nature  that  could  not  be  content  with  mediocrity  he  has  steadily  worked 
his  way  upward,  utilizing  the  means  at  hand  and  carving  out  a  road  for  him- 
self to  success  even  if  the  path  of  opportunity  seemed  closed  at  times. 


ROBERT  GEORGE  MACPHERSON. 

As  public  servant,  as  legislator  and  as  merchant,  Vancouver  knows  Robert 
George  Macpherson,  who  at  present  serves  in  the  office  of  postmaster,  and  in 
this  trifold  capacity  is  one  whose  ambition  and  ability  have  carried  him  beyond 
the  ranks  of  mediocrity  and  placed  him  in  a  position  of  leadership.  Well  known 
in  Vancouver  on  account  of  his  active  and  resultant  efforts  along  political  lines 
and  a  prominent  representative  of  the  city's  commercial  interests,  he  was  born 
in  Erin,  Wellington  county,  Ontario,  January  28,  1866.  The  grandfather,  Hugh 
Macpherson,  was  a  native  of  the  island  of  Islay  off  the  west  coast  of  Scotland, 
who  in  1858  decided  to  emigrate  to  Canada  and  grow  up  with  the  virgin 
country  in  the  enjoyment  of  the  opportunities  to  be  opened  up,  and  crossed 
the  Atlantic,  coming  to  Waterloo  county.  His  son,  Archibald  Macpherson, 
was  born  on  the  native  isle  which  saw  his  father's  birth  and  accompanied 
his  parents  to  the  new  world.  Many  members  of  the  family  rendered  distin- 
guished service  as  teachers  of  the  young  and  Archibald  Macpherson  made  that 
profession  his  life  work.  His  wife  before  her  marriage  was  Jeannette  Hall,  a 
native  of  Wellington  county,  where  their  marriage  was  celebrated  and  where 
our  subject  was  afterward  born.  Archibald  Macpherson  was  a  devoted  champion 
to  the  cause  of  education  and  the  development  of  the  school  system  of  the  dis- 
trict in  which  he  taught  was  largely  promoted  by  him  and  his  labors  were  a 
valuable  factor  in  its  intellectual  progress.  In  1891  he  passed  away  in  his  fifty- 
fourth  year,  being  survived  by  his  widow.  Two  of  their  children  subsequentlv 
came  to  British  Columbia,  namely:  Robert  George,  of  this  review;  and  Mrs. 
F.  R.  McD.  Russell,  who  is  mentioned  on  another  page  of  this  work  in  con- 
nection with  the  sketch  of  her  husband. 

Robert  George  Macpherson  was  reared  amid  the  refining  influence  of  a 
well-to-do  home  and  under  the  able  guidance  of  his  father  and  mother.  He  at- 
tended in  the  acquirement  of  his  education  the  Arthur  public  school  and  com- 
plemented his  education  by  a  course  at  Gait  Collegiate  Institute.  Early  in  life 
he  became  connected  with  the  drug  business,  gaining  a  comprehensive  knowl- 
edge of  that  trade  and  being  connected  therewith  at  New  Westminster  from 
1888  to  1895.  He  was  president  of  the  British  Columbia  Pharmaceutical  Asso- 
ciation. Since  1909  he  has  been  postmaster  of  Vancouver  and  has  displayed  re- 
markable ability  as  an  organizer  and  executive  in  this  position  as  he  has  had  to 
meet  the  tremendously  fast  growing  business  his  office  has  had  to  handle  in  con- 
nection with  the  fast  extending  trade  interests  of  the  city.  His  work  in  this 
capacity  has  been  exemplary  and  all  the  departments  of  the  institution  have 
been  so  thoroughly  organized  by  him  that  there  has  never  been  a  hitch  in 
handling  the  enormous  volume  of  mail  expeditiously. 

In  1890  Mr.  Macpherson  was  married  to  Susan  Van  Aken,  who  was  born  at 
Coldwater,  Michigan,  and  they  have  three  children,  Brita,  Bessie  and  Archie, 
all  of  whom  were  born  in  British  Columbia.  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Macpherson  are  de- 
voted members  of  St.  John's  Presbyterian  church,  to  which  organization  they 
give  their  moral  and  material  support. 

Mr.  Macpherson  is  a  stanch  liberal  in  his  political  affiliations,  was  honorary 
president  of  Vancouver  Liberal  Club,  and  has  always  deeply  concerned  himself 


26  BRITISH    COLUMBIA 

with  questions  of  public  importance  touching  the  interests  of  the  political  life 
of  the  Dominion,  his  province  or  his  city  and  also  social  aspects.  On  the  4th 
of  February,  1903,  he  found  recognition  of  his  public  spirit  by  election  to  the 
parliament  of  the  Dominion  as  representative  of  the  city  of  Vancouver  and  was 
active  on  the  floor  of  the  house  and  connected  with  much  constructive  legislation. 
He  served  on  a  number  of  important  committees  and  took  part  in  all  matters 
that  came  before  the  house  during  those  sessions,  doing  all  in  his  power  to 
promote  the  interests  of  his  province  and  secure  legislation  favorable  to  the  dis- 
trict which  had  honored  him  with  election.  His  labors  in  that  direction  resulted 
materially  and  his  services  found  recognition  in  his  reelection  on  the  4th  of 
November,  1904,  by  a  large  majority  for  a  term  of  five  years,  in  which  period 
of  time  he  has  labored  assiduously  and  painstakingly  to  bring  about  such  measures 
as  would  be  of  the  greatest  benefit  to  the  greatest  number.  He  was  strongly 
anti-Asiatic  and  a  free  trader  in  the  house  of  commons.  In  view  of  the  fact  that 
he  is  now  postmaster  he  has  no  longer  any  party  affiliations.  His  fraternal  re- 
lations are  with  Mount  Herman  Lodge,  No.  7,  A.  F.  &  A.  M.,  of  the  Masonic 
fraternity,  and  he  also  belongs  to  the  Knights  of  Pythias.  He  is  honorary  presi- 
dent of  the  Vancouver  Lacrosse  Club;  one  of  the  founders  of  the  Vancouver 
Canadian  Club  and  is  a  frequent  contributor  to  Canadian  magazines.  His  recre- 
ation consists  of  reading,  walking,  shooting  and  fishing. 

Being  attracted  to  British  Columbia  by  its  wonderful  business  opportunities, 
he  has  attained  a  distinguished  place  in  its  commercial  circles  and  has  gained 
distinct  commendation  in  connection  with  the  discharge  of  the  duties  of  his 
office,  in  which  he  has  won  the  most  favorable  criticism.  Active  and  aggressive, 
he  is  yet  sufficiently  conservative  to  weigh  carefully  any  new  idea  or  any  new 
system  before  putting  it  in  operation  and  he  has  seldom  made  a  step  in  a  false 
direction  along  any  line  of  endeavor.  Privately  he  is  a  man  kindly,  pleasant  of 
manner,  jovial  and  approachable.  He  is  ever  ready  to  receive  just  complaints 
and  tries  to  alleviate  difficulties  where  they  arise  promptly.  Although  his  office 
naturally  makes  every  moment  of  his  time  costly,  he  is  ever  ready  to  listen  to 
even  the  least  of  the  many  employes  who  work  under  him,  should  they  have  a 
personal  grievance  or  should  they  desire  to  place  before  him  a  new  idea  for  the 
betterment  of  the  service.  He  takes  a  deep  interest  in  the  history  of  the  Pacific 
coast  and  in  particular  of  that  of  British  Columbia  and  is  justly  proud  of  the 
valuable  collection  of  books  which  he  has  gathered  here  and  there  wherever  the 
opportunity  offered,  in  relation  to  this  subject.  His  collection  on  the  North 
Pacific  is  most  complete  including  old  histories,  such  as  Cook's  discoveries,  Van- 
couver's discoveries  and  Simpson's  discoveries.  A  capable  public  servant,  he  is 
naturally  widely  known  and  there  is  none  who  has  ever  come  in  contact  with 
him  who  does  not  readily  give  him  unqualified  and  high  regard. 


HENRY  S.  ROWLING. 

Henry  S.  Rowling,  president  and  managing  director  of  the  Vancouver  Real 
Estate  Company,  has  been  successfully  engaged  in  the  real-estate  business  at  Van- 
couver for  the  past  decade.  He  is  a  worthy  native  son  of  British  Columbia,  his 
birth  having  occurred  at  New  Westminster  on  the  3d  of  February,  1864.  His 
parents  were  William  Henry  and  Mary  (Russell)  Rowling,  the  former  born  in 
Truro,  Cornwall,  England,  on  February  9,  1826,  and  the  latter  in  Dorsetshire, 
England,  on  November  19,  1832.  In  that  country  their  marriage  was  celebrated. 
William  H.  Rowling  came  to  British  Columbia,  in  1858,  as  a  corporal  in  charge 
of  the  commissary  of  the  Royal  Engineers  who  were  engaged  on  the  boundary 
survey.  He  was  for  a  time  at  New  Westminster  and  subsequently  settled  on  the 
north  arm  of  the  Fraser  river,  at  a  place  now  called  Rowlings,  which  was  named 
for  him.  He  took  up  a  military  grant  of  one  hundred  and  sixty  acres  where  now 
is  South  Vancouver  and  there  spent  the  remainder  of  his  life.  He  had  also  bought 


HENRY  S.  ROWLING 


BRITISH    COLUMBIA  29 

up  a  number  of  other  military  grants.  The  date  of  his  settlement  in  South 
Vancouver  was  the  2d  of  September,  1868.  Mrs.  Rowling,  who  came  to  Canada 
two  or  three  years  after  her  husband,  died  not  many  years  later.  By  her 
marriage  she  became  the  mother  of  seven  children,  of  whom  two  are  deceased: 
Rose,  born  August  8,  1858,  who  married  William  Copeland  and  died  July 
12,  1891 ;  and  Thomas  G.,  born  April  14,  1869,  who  died  September  23,  1893. 
Those,  living  are:  James  W.,  born  October  14,  1862,  who  is  a  resident  of 
South  Vancouver;  Henry  S.,  of  this  review;  Priscilla  A.,  born  February  24, 
1866,  the  wife  of  Peter  Byrne,  who  is  the  Indian  agent  at  New  Westminster; 
William  Henry,  whose  birth  occurred  September  2,  1867,  and  who  makes  his 
home  in  California;  and  Elizabeth  J.,  born  August  24,  1874,  who  resides  with 
her  sister,  Mrs.  Peter  Byrne,  at  New  Westminster. 

Henry  S.  Rowling  attended  the  public  schools  of  New  Westminster  in  the 
acquirement  of  an  education  and  subsequently  embarked  in  the  log  contracting 
and  lumber  business,  being  engaged  in  logging  along  the  Fraser  river  and  the 
coast,  and  in  many  parts  of  the  province.  About  1890  he  opened  for  transporta- 
tion, mostly  tugging  and  logging,  the  Burnett  river,  the  outlet  of  Burnaby  lake, 
which  empties  into  the  Fraser  river  at  Burnett  Mills.  This  feat  was  by  many 
considered  impossible,  but  that  waterway  has  now  been  in  continuous  use  for 
more  than  twenty  years.  Mr.  Rowling  continued  his  operations  in  that  field  of 
activity  until  about  1903  and  then  embarked  in  the  real-estate  business,  in  which 
he  has  been  engaged  to  the  present  time,  being  now  president  and  managing 
director  of  the  Vancouver  Real  Estate  Company.  He  deals  in  all  kinds  of  city 
and  suburban  property  and  is  the  owner  of  two  business  blocks  and  much  busi- 
ness and  residence  property.  He  has  a  six-story  reinforced  concrete  building  on 
Hastings  street,  East,  which  comprises  stores  and  a  rooming  house,  and  is  now 
erecting  a  five-story  apartment  house  at  the  corner  of  Vernon  and  Albert  streets. 

On  the  I4th  of  February,  1910,  at  Vancouver,  Mr.  Rowling  was  joined  in 
wedlock  to  Miss  Mary  Houston,  of  San  Francisco,  by  whom  he  has  two  children, 
William  Norman  and  Mayo  Mary.  Fraternally  he  is  identified  with  Lodge  No. 
8  of  the  Independent  Order  of  Odd  Fellows  and  also  belongs  to  the  Loyal  Order 
of  Moose.  He  is  likewise  a  member  of  the  Press  Club  and  the  Exhibition  Asso- 
ciation. During  his  entire  life,  or  for  almost  a  half  century,  he  has  remained  a 
resident  of  British  Columbia  and  his  labors  have  been  a  potent  factor  in  the 
growth  and  development  of  this  region. 


DAVID  ANGUS  McINTOSH. 

David  Angus  Mclntosh  is  managing  director  of  Letson  &  Burpee,  Ltd.,  and  in 
this  connection  is  well  known  as  a  representative  of  the  important  productive  in- 
dustries of  Vancouver.  Diligence  and  determination  have  ever  been  salient  char- 
acteristics of  his  life  and  have  constituted  the  measure  of  his  advancement  in 
the  business  world.  He  was  born  January  21,  1870,  in  Kent  county,  New  Bruns- 
wick, a  son  of  Angus  and  Christina  Mclntosh,  who  were  farming  people  in  the 
east.  In  the  public  schools  of  Chatham,  New  Brunswick,  the  son  began  his 
education  and  afterward  attended  the  Provincial  Normal  School  at  Fredericton. 
He  afterward  took  up  the  profession  of  teaching,  which  he  followed  for  a  time 
in  his  native  province  and  then  resumed  his  own  education  as  a  student  in  the 
University  of  New  Brunswick,  from  which  he  was  graduated  in  1894  with  the 
degree  of  Bachelor  of  Science.  He  continued  a  resident  of  the  east  until  1902, 
when  he  came  to  British  Columbia  and  entered  into  association  with  Letson  & 
Burpee,  Ltd.,  in  which  connection  he  has  gradually  worked  his  way  upward  as 
his  ability  and  perseverance  have  indicated  his  fitness  for  promotion.  In  1907 
he  was  made  managing  director,  which  office  he  still  fills.  Letson  &  Burpee, 
Ltd.,  are  machinists  and  die-makers,  pattern-makers  and  founders,  and  are  pat- 
entees and  manufacturers  of  modern  canning  machinery,  gasoline  engines,  etc. 


30  BRITISH    COLUMBIA 

The  output  of  their  plant  is  noted  for  its  high  standard  of  excellence  in  work- 
manship and  durability  and  the  trade  of  the  house  is  constantly  growing.  As 
managing  director  Mr.  Mclntosh  largely  controls  interests  and  the  business  has 
now  reached  a  volume  which  makes  it  one  of  the  important  industrial  concerns 
of  Vancouver. 

Mr.  Mclntosh  has  an  interesting  military  chapter  in  his  life  record,  having 
for  several  years  been  a  lieutenant  in  the  Seventy-third  Regiment  of  Volunteers, 
known  as  the  Northumberland  Regiment.  He  is  an  enthusiastic  rifleman,  having 
been  a  member  of  the  Vancouver  Rifle  Association  since  1905.  In  politics  he  is 
a  conservative,  with  firm  belief  in  the  principles  of  the  party,  but  he  has  never 
sought  nor  desired  office. 

On  the  i9th  of  October,  1911,  in  Vancouver,  Mr.  Mclntosh  was  married  to 
Miss  Katherine  Menzies,  a  representative  of  an  old  Toronto  family,  her  father 
being  Charles  Menzies,  a  contractor  of  Toronto,  Ontario.  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Mc- 
lntosh attend  the  Presbyterian  church  and  they  have  gained  many  friends  during 
the  period  of  their  residence  in  Vancouver,  warm  regard  being  entertained  for 
them  by  reason  of  their  many  sterling  traits  of  character. 


HENRY  TRACY  CEPERLEY. 

While  practically  living  retired,  Henry  Tracy  Ceperley  still  retains  the  presi- 
dency of  Ceperley,  Roimsefell  &  Company,  Limited,  insurance,  loaning  and  finan- 
cial agents.  His  attention,  however,  is  largely  now  given  to  his  private  interests. 
His  activities  in  former  years,  however,  have  proven  factors  in  the  city's  upbuilding 
and  he  belongs  to  that  class  of  representative  western  men  who  have  recognized  the 
eternal  truth  that  industry  wins  and  have  made  industry  the  beacon  light  of  their 
lives.  Centuries  ago  a  Greek  philosopher  said:  "Earn  thy  reward;  the  gods 
give  naught  to  sloth;"  and  this  admonition  has  been  verified  in  all  the  ages  which 
have  since  run  their  course. 

Mr.  Ceperley  was  born  in  Oneonta,  New  York,  January  10,  1851,  a  son  of 
Martin  and  Desiah  (Winnie)  Ceperley,  the  family  coming  of  Dutch  ancestry. 
Henry  T.  Ceperley  was  the  youngest  of  sixteen  children,  of  whom  but  four  are 
now  living,  and  is  the  only  one  of  the  family  in  British  Columbia.  The  parents 
both  passed  away  in  the  state  of  New  York,  the  father  at  the  age  of  eighty-two 
years  and  the  mother  when  sixty-five  years  of  age. 

In  the  public  schools  of  his  native  city  Henry  T.  Ceperley  pursued  his  early 
education  and  afterward  attended  Whitestown  Seminary,  but  at  an  early  age  was 
thrown  upon  his  own  resources  and  whatever  success  he  has  achieved  and  enjoyed 
is  attributable  entirely  to  his  enterprise,  capable  management  and  diligence.  In 
early  manhood  he  began  teaching  in  the  country  schools  of  Otsego  county,  New 
York,  where  he  was  thus  engaged  until  1871,  when  he  went  to  Winona,  Minne- 
sota, where  he  became  connected  with  the  produce  and  commission  business. 
After  five  years  spent  in  that  city  he  went  south  to  New  Mexico,  entering  the 
employ  as  cashier  and  bookkeeper  of  a  large  construction  company  engaged  in 
building  that  portion  of  the  Atchison,  Topeka  &  Santa  Fe  Railroad  between  Las 
Vegas  and  Santa  Fe.  He  spent  three  years  in  the  southwest  and  in  1883  went  to 
Montana,  where  he  formed  a  company  for  handling  cattle.  In  addition  he  also 
established  an  insurance  business  in  Livingston  and  thus  made  his  initial  step 
in  the  insurance  field,  in  which  he  has  steadily  advanced  until  his  firm  now  con- 
trols a  business  of  large  proportions,  exceeding  all  others  in  British  Columbia. 

Mr.  Ceperley  came  to  this  province  in  1886  and  soon  thereafter  formed  a 
partnership  with  A.  W.  Ross  for  the  conduct  of  a  general  real-estate  and  insurance 
business.  This  partnership  was  continued  until  1891,  when  Mr.  Ross  sold  his 
interest  to  Mr.  Ceperley  and  returned  to  Winnipeg.  The  latter  continued  the 
business,  which  has  grown  to  be  the  largest  in  British  Columbia.  While  the  pres- 
ent firm  of  Ceperley,  Rounsefell  &  Company,  Limited,  carries  on  a  general  real- 


HENRY  T.  CEPERLEY 


BRITISH    COLUMBIA  33 

estate,  financial  and  mining  brokerage  business,  their  principal  strength  lies  in  the 
insurance  work,  which  has  become  very  extensive  all  over  the  province.  They 
are  the  general  agents  for  the  Phoenix  of  London  and  for  the  Liverpool  &  London 
&  Globe.  The  success  of  the  company  has  been  due  in  large  measure  to  the  efforts 
and  the  administrative  direction  of  the  president,  who  has  constantly  sought  out 
opportunities  to  extend  the  connections  of  the  firm,  his  practical  ideas  and  plans 
bringing  about  tangible  results.  In  1910  Mr.  Ceperley  retired  from  active  par- 
ticipation in  the  business,  although  he  retains  the  presidency  of  the  company. 
He  has  other  large  personal  business  interests  that  require  his  time.  He  is  the 
president  of  the  Vancouver  Milling  &  Grain  Company,  of  which  he  is  one  of  the 
organizers  and  incorporators.  This  concern  was  established  to  conduct  the  ex- 
portation of  grain  and  flour  and  is  the  only  business  of  the  kind  in  the  province 
and  is  doing  a  large  and  rapidly  increasing  business.  Mr.  Ceperley  is  also  man- 
aging director  of  the  British  America  Development  Company  and  was  one  of  the 
provisional  directors  of  the  Bank  of  Vancouver  during  its  incorporation.  He  has 
recognized  and  utilized  opportunities  which  others  have  passed  heedlessly  by  and 
in  the  promotion  of  his  business  interests  has  advanced  public  prosperity  and 
progress  as  well  as  individual  success. 

Mr.  Ceperley  has  been  married  twice.  In  1882,  at  Winona,  Minnesota,  he 
wedded  Miss  Jennie  Foster,  of  that  place,  who  died  in  Winona  in  1892,  leaving 
two  children :  Ethelwyn,  the  wife  of  J.  E.  Hall,  managing  director  of  the  Van- 
couver Milling  &  Grain  Company;  and  Arthur  T.,  who  is  connected  with  the 
Jobes  Milling  Company  of  Portland,  Oregon.  For  his  second  wife  Mr.  Ceperley 
chose  Miss  Grace  Dixon,  of  Mount  Clemens,  Michigan.  The  family  home  is  at 
Burnaby  Lake,  a  superb  of  Vancouver.  Mr.  Ceperley  is  cast  in  heroic  mold, 
being  six  feet  and  three  inches  in  height  and  weighing  two  hundred  and  forty 
pounds.  He  is  a  most  genial,  companionable  gentleman  and  has  gained  a  host  of 
warm  friends  during  his  residence  in  the  northwest.  He  is  a  member  of  the 
Vancouver  Board  of  Trade  and  was  for  a  number  of  years  a  member  of  its  coun- 
cil. In  his  earlier  years  he  was  an  active  member  of  the  Masonic  and  Knights 
of  Pythias  fraternities.  He  is  now  identified  with  several  of  the  leading  clubs,  for 
two  years  was  president  of  the  Terminal  City  Club,  is  a  member  of  the  Jericho 
Country  Club  and  of  the  Vancouver  Golf  Club.  The  spirit  of  American  activity 
and  enterprise  has  led  him  out  of  humble  surroundings  into  most  important  busi- 
ness and  financial  relations,  and  British  Columbia  has  profited  by  his  efforts  and 
his  public  spirit. 


EDWARD  BLAKE  GRANT. 

Edward  Blake  Grant,  mechanical  engineer  of  Vancouver,  was  born  at 
Moncton,  New  Brunswick,  on  the  ist  of  May,  1885,  a  son  of  His  Honor,  David 
Grant  and  Jane  (Kinnear)  Grant,  both  now  residents  of  Vancouver,  the  former 
being  judge  of  the  county  court. 

Edward  Blake  Grant  was  educated  in  the  public  schools  of  his  native  city  and 
later  attended  the  Aberdeen  high  school,  from  which  he  was  graduated  with 
the  class  of  1900.  He  started  in  the  business  world  in  connection  with  the  engi- 
neering department  of  the  Intercolonial  Railroad,  and  a  year  afterward  came 
to  Vancouver,  arriving  in  1901.  His  parents  had  preceded  him  and  their  favor- 
able reports  concerning  the  western  country  led  him  to  seek  the  opportunities 
here  offered.  Following  his  arrival  he  was  employed  in  the  engineering  depart- 
ment of  the  Vancouver  Engineering  Works  and  subsequently  entered  the  iron 
works  oi  Ross  &  Howard,  having  charge  of  the  drawing  department  for  six 
years.  He  engaged  in  business  on  his  own  account,  and  at  the  end  of  that  time 
opened  his  office  as  a  mechanical  engineer.  He  is  making  a  specialty  of  boiler 
designing  in  accordance  with  the  British  Columbia  and  marine  rules.  He  pre- 
pared general  machinery  designs  and  made  the  machinery  installation  plans  for 
v..i  in— 2 


34  BRITISH    COLUMBIA 

the  North  Vanconver  city  ferries  Nos.  3  and  4,  and  has  done  other  equally 
important  work.  He  has  organized  the  mechanical  engineering  class  in  connec- 
tion with  the  night  school  conducted  by  the  board  of  education  of  Vancouver. 
He  now  has  three  classes  under  his  supervision  and  acts  as  a  teacher  of  one. 
Mr.  Grant  was  married  on  the  25th  of  September,  1907,  to  Miss  Greta  Jones, 
of  Moncton,  New  Brunswick,  a  daughter  of  Charles  and  Mary  Jones.  His 
political  belief  is  that  of  the  liberal  party,  and  his  religious  faith  that  of  the 
Presbyterian  church. 


JOHN  B.  BRIGHT,  C.  E. 

Among  the  engineers  and  railway  contractors  of  the  Canadian  northwest 
there  is  no  name  that  has  a  higher  sound  than  that  of  John  B.  Bright,  who  as 
member  of  the  firm  of  Bright,  McDonald  &  Company,  of  Vancouver,  has  been 
connected  with  some  of  the  most  important  construction  work  in  the  Dominion. 
While  he  has  attained  a  remarkable  personal  success,  much  of  the  work  which  he 
has  accomplished  has  had  a  far-reaching  effect  in  the  general  development  and  the 
opening  up  of  new  regions  and  territories.  He  was  born  in  Woolsthorpe,  Lin- 
colnshire, England,  June  27,  1860,  a  son  of  James  and  Harriet  Annie  Bright,  and 
educated  in  country  and  private  schools.  Showing  early  in  life  an  inclination  for 
engineering  work,  he  then  was  articled  with  S.  &  W.  Pattison,  of  Sleaford,  rail- 
way contractors,  devoting  his  time  to  studying  engineering  feats  and  problems 
and  making  himself  acquainted  with  the  details  and  business  routine  of  the  pro- 
fession. The  year  1882  marked  his  arrival  in  Canada  and  upon  his  coming  here  he 
joined  the  engineering  staff  of  the  Canadian  Pacific  at  Winnipeg,  going  in  the 
same  year  to  the  mountains,  where  he  engaged  in  the  location  and  construction  of 
the  mountain  division,  being  so  employed  until  1887.  In  that  year  he  left  the 
services  of  the  Canadian  Pacific  Railroad,  becoming  connected  with  construction 
work  of  the  Oregon  Pacific  in  the  Cascade  mountains.  In  1888  he  was  locating 
for  the  Oregon  Railroad  &  Navigation  Company  in  Oregon  and  Idaho  and  also 
was  employed  in  construction  work  of  the  old  Seattle,  Lake  Shore  &  Eastern  Rail- 
way. Returning  to  Canada,  he  was  then  appointed  by  the  department  of  public 
works  of  the  Dominion  government  as  engineer  of  roads'  and  bridges  for  the 
Northwest  Territories,  receiving  his  commission  in  1889  and  so  continuing  until 
his  resignation  in  1897,  when  he  joined  the  engineering  staff  on  the  Crows  Nest 
branch  of  the  Canadian  Pacific.  After  completing  this  line  he  became  connected 
with  the  Great  Falls  &  Canada  Railway  and  also  did  important  work  on  St.  Mary's 
irrigation  canal.  In  1900  he  had  charge  of  building  the  bridges  on  the  Ontario  & 
Rainy  River  Railway  between  Port  Arthur  and  Fort  Francis,  and  after  the  com- 
pletion of  this  work  in  1903  began  contracting  on  irrigation  work  in  southern 
Alberta  and  railroad  work  in  Crows  Nest  Pass  for  the  International  Coal  &  Coke 
Company.  In  1904  the  Canadian  Northern  Railroad  Company  entrusted  him  with 
contracts  to  be  executed  between  Battleford  and  Edmonton  and  in  1905  and  1906 
he  devoted  most  of  his  time  to  contract  work  on  the  Nicola  valley  branch  of  the 
Canadian  Pacific.  In  1907  he  was  awarded  the  contract  on  the  Great  Northern 
cut-off  from  Westminster  to  Blaine,  and  he  also  built  in  that  year  the  Eburne 
Westminster  branch  for  the  Canadian  Pacific.  In  1908  he  began  work  on  the 
Esquimalt  &  Nanaimo  extension  from  Wellington,  Vancouver  island,  and  in  1910 
handled  the  contract  for  the  Cameron  Lake  section  on  the  Alberni  extension  of  the 
Esquimalt  &  Nanaimo  Railway.  In  1912  he  built  the  scenic  road  from  Laggan  to 
Lake  Louise  and  is  at  present  double  tracking  the  Canadian  Pacific  Railroad. 

In  1907  Mr.  Bright  was  united  in  marriage  to  Miss  Mabel  Amelia  Hardiman 
and  they  have  one  son,  Richard  Aubrey,  and  two  daughters,  Muriel  Aubrey  and 
Phylis  Mary.  He  is  a  Mason,  belonging  to  Mountain  Lodge  No.  9,  a  member  of 
the  Terminal  City  Club  and  finds  recreation  in  fishing  and  shooting.  The  family 
residence  is  located  at  No.  1943  Comox  street  and  there  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Bright 


JOHN  B.  BEIGHT 


BRITISH    COLUMBIA  37 

extend  a  warm-hearted  hospitality  to  their  many  friends.  A  public-spirited  man 
thoroughly  aware  of  the  obligations  of  citizenship,  Mr.  Bright  takes  a  deep  inter- 
est in  all  questions  of  public  welfare  and  supports  many  worthy  enterprises  under- 
taken in  the  interest  of  the  public.  He  has  done  important  work  in  bringing  about 
the  advancement  and  development  of  vast  sections  of  the  Dominion  and  his  life's 
labors  cannot  be  too  highly  estimated  in  the  effect  which  they  have  upon  prevailing 
conditions. 


ALBERT  J.  HILL. 

Albert  J.  Hill  enjoys  a  well  earned  rest  at  his  beautiful  home  at  the  corner 
of  Fourth  street  and  Fifth  avenue  in  New  Westminster.  He  won  a  position  of 
distinction  in  civil  engineering  circles  and  for  many  years  was  connected  with 
railway  building  and  with  the  development  of  the  rich  coal  deposits  of  the 
west.  His  efforts  constituted  an  element  in  the  substantial  development  and 
progress  of  the  sections  in  which  he  labored.  He  was  born  at  Sydney,  Cape 
Breton,  Nova  Scotia,  April  7,  1836,  his  parents  being  John  Lewis  and  Margaret 
(Whyte)  Hill,  the  latter  a  daughter  of  Dr.  Joseph  Whyte,  R.  N.,  of  Banff,  Scot- 
land. In  the  paternal  line  Albert  J.  Hill  represents  one  of  the  old  United  Em- 
pire Loyalist  families,  the  ancestry  being  traced  back  to  William  Hill,  who  at 
the  time  of  the  outbreak  of  the  Revolutionary  war  forfeited  his  right  to  a  con- 
siderable amount  of  property  in  New  England  and  made  his  way  to  Nova  Scotia, 
accompanied  by  his  household  of  sixteen  persons.  He  continued  loyal  to  the 
crown,  nor  would  he  renounce  his  faith  in  the  divine  right  of  his  sovereign.  He 
cast  in  his  lot  with  the  pioneer  residents  of  Nova  Scotia  and  was  appointed  comp- 
troller of  His  Majesty's  customs  in  the  crown  colony  of  the  island  of  Cape  Breton, 
where  he  remained  until  his  death,  which  occurred  at  Sydney  in  1802.  The 
history  of  the  maternal  ancestry  of  Albert  J.  Hill  includes  the  names  of  Burns, 
Shand  and  Whyte-Melville,  prominent  Scotch  families. 

The  early  education  of  A.  J.  Hill  was  acquired  at  home  and  he  afterward 
spent  several  years  in  shipbuilding,  being  associated  with  his  brothers  in  the 
building  and  launching  of  two  schooners.  Later  he  went  to  Boston  as  supercargo 
of  the  schooner  Marian,  carrying  the  first  load  of  coal  from  the  island  after 
the  purchase  of  the  rights  of  the  Duke  of  York  in  1860.  He  entered  the  Horton 
Collegiate  Academy  in  August,  1866,  and  there  completed  his  education.  On 
July  19,  1866,  he  married  Agnes  Lawrence,  the  youngest  daughter  of  Alexander 
Lawrence,  of  St.  John,  New  Brunswick,  and  a  sister  of  J.  W.  Lawrence,  for 
many  years  a  prominent  factor  in  political  circles  of  the  province.  Unto  this 
marriage  were  born  two  sons  and  two  daughters :  Elizabeth  Carrick,  the  wife  of 
F.  J.  Coulthard ;  Grace  Irene,  who  passed  away  March  30,  1881 ;  Egerton  Boyd 
Lawrence;  and  Frederic  Tremaine. 

Following  his  graduation  Mr.  Hill  spent  two  years  as  a  member  of  the  faculty 
of  Horton  Academy  and  in  May,  1868,  accepted  an  appointment  on  the  Euro- 
pean &  North  American  Railroad,  assisting  in  locating  the  line  to  Winn  on  the 
Penobscot  river.  In  May,  1869,  he  received  an  appointment  on  the  government 
staff  of  the  Intercolonial  Railway  in  Miramichi,  New  Brunswick,  on  the  surveys 
and  location  of  sections  20,  21  and  22  in  New  Brunswick.  On  the  ist  of  Janu- 
ary, 1870,  he  was  transferred  to  aid  in  the  construction  of  section  12  at  Truro, 
Nova  Scotia,  and  continued  his  work  on  sections  12  and  7  until  January  i,  1872. 
In  the  meantime  he  located  the  Acadia  mines  branch  and  the  present  Springhill 
branch  lines.  In  February,  1872,  he  accepted  a  position  on  the  staff  of  the  Louis- 
burg  Mineral  Railway  and  carried  on  the  exploration  work  of  that  line,  con- 
tinuing the  work  of  locating  the  line  and  acting  as  chief  engineer  for  the  Lon- 
don contractors  until  the  work  of  construction  was  completed  in  1874. 

Mr.  Hill  turned  from  railway  building  to  the  development  of  the  coal  re- 
sources of  the  country.  He  was  appointed  manager  of  the  Lorway  and  Emory 


38  BRITISH    COLUMBIA 

collieries  and  opened  and  operated  the  latter  in  1872  and  1873.  He  carried  out 
a  geological  survey  of  the  eastern  Cape  Breton  coal  fields,  afterward  embodied 
with  the  plans  of  the  Dominion  geological  survey  and  published  by  order  of 
the  government.  He  prepared  and  published  a  map  of  the  island  of  Cape  Breton 
in  1875.  In  the  employ  of  the  local  government  of  Nova  Scotia  he  conducted 
the  surveys  of  the  Thompson  and  Pugwash  and  of  the  Springhill  and  Pugwash 
railway  lines.  In  1876  he  was  appointed  manager  of  the  Cumberland  colliery 
and  continued  that  work  until  the  amalgamation  of  the  company  with  the  Coal 
Mining  Association  in  1877.  He  made  surveys  for  the  Maccan  and  Joggins  branch 
railway  and  in  1877  was  engaged  on  the  geological  survey  staff  in  examination  of 
the  southern  portion  of  Cumberland  county,  Nova  Scotia.  He  surveyed  the  Ox- 
ford &  Pugwash  Railway  for  the  Dominion  government  and  in  1878  was  com- 
missioned provincial  crown  land  surveyor  for  Cumberland  and  executed  topo- 
graphical surveys  for  the  local  government.  In  1879  he  went  to  Algoma  for 
the  Dominion  government  in  connection  with  the  contracts  from  Sunshine  creek 
to  English  river  and  prepared  an  interesting  suite  of  geological  specimens,  which 
were  presented  to  McGill  University. 

On  the  ist  of  January,  1880,  Mr.  Hill  was  ordered  to  British  Columbia  on 
the  construction  of  the  Canadian  Pacific  Railroad,  on  the  contract  from  Yale  to 
Savonas.  He  continued  in  that  work  until  October,  1882,  when  he  was  removed 
to  Port  Moody,  closing  his  connection  with  the  government  service  in  December, 
1884.  Since  that  time  he  has  engaged  in  the  private  practice  of  his  profession 
in  New  Westminster,  although  he  is  now  practically  living  retired.  He  has  en- 
joyed an  extensive  general  practice  in  all  parts  of  the  Dominion  and  has  been 
engineer  for  the  municipality  of  Surrey. 

Mr.  Hill  was  one  of  the  first  members  of  the  Canadian  Society  of  Civil 
Engineers,  was  one  of  the  incorporators  of  the  Coquitlan  Water  Works  Com- 
pany, is  a  member  of  the  Institute  of  Mining  Engineers  of  England,  a  member  of 
the  Historical  Society  of  Nova  Scotia,  a  member  of  the  American  Association 
for  the  Advancement  of  Science  and  a  member  of  the  National  Geographic 
Society  and  the  Sullivant  Moss  Society,  both  of  the  United  States.  He  is  corre- 
sponding member  of  the  Ottawa  Field  Naturalists  Club.  He  is  also  connected 
with  the  British  Columbia  Land  Surveyors  Corporation,  is  provincial  crown  land 
surveyor  of  Nova  Scotia  and  is  agent  in  British  Columbia  for  the  government 
of  Nova  Scotia.  He  has  the  A.  B.  and  A.  M.  degrees  of  Acadia  University  of 
Nova  Scotia  and  addendums  of  the  Halifax  and  British  Columbia  Universities. 
He  is  also  a  member  of  the  United  Empire  Loyalist  Association  of  Canada. 

Mr.  Hill  was  chief  engineer  of  the  New  Westminster  Southern  Railway  from 
its  inception  until  August  i,  1889,  and  carried  out  the  local  surveys  for  the  line. 
He  resigned  his  position  at  the  latter  date  in  order  to  devote  his  whole  attention 
to  his  increasing  private  practice.  He  has  rendered  efficient  service  both  in 
public  and  private  capacities  to  geological  research  in  his  native  province  and  in 
British  Columbia.  In  politics  he  has  always  been  a  consistent  conservative  yet 
holds  principle  as  higher  than  party.  His  life  work  has  been  a  valuable  contribu- 
tion to  those  labors  which  figure  as  factors  in  civilization  and  general  improve- 
ment and  he  has  a  wide  acquaintance  among  those  who  are  prominent  in  scientific 
and  professional  circles  throughout  the  country. 


ALEXANDER  ROBERT  MANN. 

Vancouver  has  numbered  Alexander  Robert  Mann  among  its  citizens  but  lit- 
tle more  than  a  year.  His  name,  however,  is  a  familiar  one  throughout  the  prov- 
ince of  British  Columbia,  the  entire  west,  and  also  through  the  province  of  Ontario, 
for  as  a  railroad  builder  his  work  has  drawn  to  him  the  attention  of  the  people 
of  many  sections  which  his  labors  have  opened  up  to  development  and  improve- 
ment. There  is  no  single  agency  as  important  in  the  upbuilding  of  a  country 


ALEXANDER  R.  MANN 


BRITISH    COLUMBIA  41 

as  the  introduction  of  railroads,  which  annihilate  time  and  space  and  bring  the 
residents  of  a  new  country  into  close  contact  with  older  sections,  thus  providing 
them  with  a  market.  Since  he  started  out  in  life  as  a  young  man  still  in  his 
teens  Mr.  Mann  has  been  connected  with  railway  building  operations. 

A  native  of  Ontario,  Mr.  Mann  was  born  at  Acton,  on  the  2ist  of  July,  1861, 
a  son  of  Hugh  and  Ellen  (Macdonnell)  Mann,  both  of  whom  were  natives  of 
the  highlands  of  Scotland.  The  father  came  to  Canada  in  1836,  settling  in  Halton 
county,  Ontario,  where  he  engaged  in  farming  until  his  death.  The  son  pursued 
his  education  in  the  public  schools  of  Acton  and  afterward  worked  on  the  home 
farm  until  1879,  when  at  the  age  of  eighteen  years  he  removed  to  Winnipeg,  where 
began  his  association  with  railroad  construction  work,  in  which  he  has  remained 
continuously  to  the  present  time.  In  1884-5  he  was  employed  on  the  construc- 
tion of  the  Canadian  Pacific  Railway  through  the  Rocky  mountains.  In  1886 
he  built  a  part  of  the  Manitoba  &  Northwestern  Railway  for  the  Canadian  North- 
ern Railway.  In  all  the  years  which  have  since  come  and  gone  his  duties  and  activ- 
ities have  increased  in  volume  and  importance  until  his  work  has  made  him  one 
of  the  empire  builders  of  the  west.  In  1887-8  he  was  engaged  on  railway  con- 
struction work  for  the  Canadian  Pacific  in  the  state  of  Maine,  and  in  1889  he 
built  a  part  of  the  Northern  Pacific  from  Morris,  Manitoba,  westward.  About 
that  time  he  also  engaged  in  the  lumber  business  at  Fort  Francis,  Ontario,  and 
in  1890  he  was  awarded  the  contract  for  the  building  of  a  part  of  the  Long  Lake 
and  Regina  branch  of  the  Canadian  Pacific  Railway.  In  the  succeeding  year  he 
built  a  part  of  the  Calgary  Edmonton  Railway  from  Fort  McLeod  to  Edmon- 
ton, Alberta,  and  in  1892  his  work  included  the  construction  of  a  part  of  the 
Soo  line  of  the  Canadian  Pacific  from  Estevan  into  Regina.  In  1893-4  his  activ- 
ity in  railway  building  in  British  Columbia  began,  when  was  awarded  him  the 
contract  for  a  part  of  the  Canadian  Pacific  Railway  branch  from  Nakusk  to  New 
Denver  in  the  Kootenay.  In  1894  he  engaged  in  handling  ore  in  the  Slocan  dis- 
trict and  so  continued  until  1897,  when  he  again  engaged  in  railway  construc- 
tion work,  building  a  portion  of  that  part  of  the  Columbia  &  Western  Railway 
between  Robinson  and  Midway  in  1898.  After  the  completion  of  this  contract 
he  returned  to  Port  Arthur,  Ontario,  where  he  was  engaged  on  the  building  of 
the  Rainy  River  branch  of  the  Canadian  Northern  Railway  until  1901.  He  also 
became  extensively  interested  in  the  lumber  business  at  Rainy  Lake  and  on  the 
Turtle  river.  In  1902  he  built  the  line  of  the  Canadian  Northern  Railway  from 
Neepawa  and  McCreary  and  in  1903  built  the  Greenway  branch  of  eighty  miles 
for  the  Canadian  Northern  Railway. 

Mr.  Mann  had  operated  under  his  own  name  up  to  that  time,  but  in  1904  he 
formed  the  Northern  Construction  Company,  Ltd.,  of  which  he  became  president 
and  so  continues.  The  first  contract  awarded  him  under  the  organization  of  the 
present  company  was  for  the  building  of  the  James  Bay  road  from  Toronto  to 
Sudbury,  Ontario,  which  contract  was  completed  in  1906.  In  the  same  year  he 
again  took  up  construction  work  for  the  Canadian  Northern  Railway  in  British 
Columbia  and  built  the  Goose  Lake  branch  of  that  road.  Since  that  time  he 
has  been  continuously  engaged  in  construction  work  for  the  Canadian  Northern 
in  this  province,  having  now  some  seventeen  hundred  miles  under  construction 
for  that  road.  The  importance  of  his  work  cannot  be  overestimated.  As  a  rail- 
road builder  he  has  opened  up  new  districts  to  settlement  and  to  civilization; 
he  has  solved  difficult  engineering  problems,  has  worked  out  the  answer  to  impor- 
tant questions  involving  broad  and  thorough  scientific  knowledge  as  well  as  prac- 
tical skill,  and  has  achieved  notable  success  in  the  tasks  that  he  has  undertaken. 
Aside  from  his  railway  building  operations  he  has  various  financial  interests.  He 
is  still  extensively  connected  with  the  lumber  business  and  is  the  owner  of  farm 
lands  all  over  western  Canada,  among  his  farm  holdings  being  a  tract  of  fifteen 
hundred  acres  in  Milford,  Saskatchewan.  Since  1912  he  has  made  his  home  in 
Vancouver. 

It  was  on  the  I7th  of  June,  1907,  that  Mr.  Mann  was  united  in  marriage 
at  Owen  Sound,  Ontario,  to  Miss  Jennie  Malcolm,  a  daughter  of  Robert  Mai- 


42  BRITISH    COLUMBIA 

colm  of  that  city.  They  now  have  one  daughter,  Alix,  born  August  28,  1910. 
Mr.  Mann  is  a  member  of  the  Carleton  Club  of  Winnipeg,  the  Albany  Club  of 
Toronto,  and  the  Commercial  Club  of  Vancouver,  and  he  also  holds  membership 
in  the  Presbyterian  church.  The  nature  and  importance  of  his  work  as  railway 
builder  has  made  him  known  throughout  the  greater  part  of  Canada,  and  his  name 
figures  prominently  in  the  field  of  labor  which  he  chose  as  a  life  work.  His  power 
has  grown  through  the  exercise  of  effort;  his  ability  has  developed  as  he  has 
called  forth  his  latent  energies,  and  in  all  he  has  manifested  those  qualities  of 
leadership  which  have  not  only  enabled  him  to  direct  the  labors  of  those  under 
him  but  have  also  been  manifest  in  the  initiative  spirit 'that  has  recognized  and 
improved  opportunities  that  others  have  passed  heedlessly  by. 


JOSEPH  WALTER  McFARLAND. 

Joseph  Walter  McFarland  is  a  pioneer  of  Vancouver  to  whose  credit  may 
be  attributed  the  establishment  and  development  of  many  of  the  more  impor- 
tant features  in  the  upbuilding  of  the  city  and  province.  He  has  figured  promi- 
nently as  a  railroad  builder,  was  the  promoter  of  the  waterworks  and  the  elec- 
tric lighting  projects  of  Vancouver  and  the  builder  of  the  first  large  private 
dock.  All  these  and  many  more  tangible  evidences  of  his  public  spirit  and  his 
business  ability  can  be  given  and  indicate  how  closely  he  has  been  identified 
with  the  history  of  the  northwest.  A  native  of  Niagara,  Ontario,  his  parents 
were  John  and  Amelia  McFarland,  both  representatives  of  old  United  Empire 
Loyalist  families  who  were  pioneer  settlers  on  the  Niagara  peninsula.  Mrs. 
McFarland  was  a  daughter  of  George  Keefer,  one  of  the  original  builders  of 
the  Welland  canal. 

In  primary  and  grammar  schools  of  Welland  county,  Ontario,  Joseph  W. 
McFarland  pursued  his  education  and  after  putting  aside  his  text-books  went 
to  Massachusetts,  where  he  was  employed  in  connection  with  the  construction 
of  the  Hoosac  Tunnel  by  F.  Shanley  &  Company,  builders,  the  project  being 
financed  by  "Boss"  Tweed  of  New  York.  This  was  his  initial  experience  in 
the  business  world.  He  left  Massachusetts  in  1878  and  returned  to  Ontario, 
settling  at  Hamilton.  He  became  associated  with  the  Great  Western  Railroad 
there  and  also  in  London,  Ontario,  remaining  with  that  corporation  until  1880, 
when  he  resigned  to  enter  the  service  of  the  Northern  Transit  Company  of 
Port  Huron,  Michigan.  Following  their  failure  in  1881  he  returned  to  the 
Great  Western  Railway  Company  at  Detroit,  Michigan,  where  he  continued 
until  1884,  when  he  came  to  British  Columbia.  In  the  intervening  period,  cover- 
ing almost  three  decades,  he  has  been  a  most  prominent  factor  in  promoting 
public  improvement  and  progress.  He  had  charge  of  railway  construction  as 
manager  for  H.  F.  Keefer  and  built  forty  miles  of  the  Canadian  Pacific  Rail- 
road from  Kamloops  to  Shuswap  lake.  In  1885  he  returned  to  Victoria  and 
had  charge  of  the  construction  of  the  Esquimalt  &  Nanaimo  Railway  at  Shaw- 
nigan  Lake.  In  the  latter  part  of  1885  and  the  early  part  of  1886  he  built, 
under  the  same  management,  the  line  of  the  Canadian  Pacific  from  Port  Moody 
to  Coal  Harbor  and  English  Bay.  After  his  work  was  finished  in  1886  he 
joined  the  late  George  A.  Keefer  in  organizing  the  Vancouver  Water  Works 
Company,  of  which  he  was  elected  secretary  and  manager,  thus  actively  con- 
trolling the  business  until  it  was  acquired  by  the  city  in  1892.  It  was  also  in 
1886  that  in  connection  with  the  late  David  Oppenheimer,  the  second  mayor  of 
Vancouver,  he  organized  the  Vancouver  Electric  Illuminating  Company,  Limited, 
of  which  he  was  elected  secretary.  This  became  the  nucleus  of  the  present  British 
Columbia  Electric  Company  and  was  the  initial  movement  for  the  electric  lighting 
of  the  city.  He  also  with  other  old-timers  organized  the  Vancouver  Wharfage 
&  Storage  Company,  Limited,  of  which  he  was  made  the  secretary.  This  company 
built  a  wharf  at  the  foot  of  Carroll  street,  being  the  first  large  private  dock  to 


JOSEPH  W.  McFARLAND 


BRITISH    COLUMBIA  45 

be  used  for  public  purposes  in  the  city.  The  Canadian  Pacific  Railroad  disputed 
their  rights  to  this  dock  and  after  an  accident  which  destroyed  it  the  property 
was  abandoned  to  the  railroad  company.  In  1886  Mr.  McFarland  organized 
the  North  Vancouver  Electric  Company,  Limited,  and  was  elected  secretary. 
This  company  proposed  to  generate  electricity  from  the  Capilano  river  for 
power  purposes  for  the  city  of  Vancouver.  Closely  associated  with  various 
projects  looking  to  the  development  and  utilization  of  the  resources  of  this  sec- 
tion of  the  country  and  in  large  measure  foreseeing  and  meeting  the  needs  of 
the  growing  city,  Mr.  McFarland  became  recognized  as  one  of  the  foremost 
factors  in  Vancouver's  improvement  and  upbuilding.  In  1892  he  established 
a  real-estate,  insurance  and  loan  business  which  in  1894  was  organized  under 
a  joint  stock  company  known  as  Mahon,  McFarland  &  Mahon,  Limited,  of 
which  he  was  president,  so  continuing  until  1911,  when  he  retired  from  active 
business,  the  company  having  been  absorbed  by  the  London  &  British  North 
America  Company,  Limited,  one  of  the  largest  and  strongest  financial  institu- 
tions in  Canada.  Mr.  McFarland  is  now  giving  his  attention  to  his  invested 
interests  only,  managing  his  private  affairs,  which  have  grown  in  extent  and 
volume.  In  addition  to  the  other  interests  previously  mentioned  he  was  in  early 
days  secretary  of  the  Nicola  Valley  Railway  Company,  of  the  Chilliwack  Rail- 
way Company  and  of  the  Shuswap  &  Okanagan  Railway  Company. 

On  the  1 5th  of  November,  1888,  at  Detroit,  Michigan,  Mr.  McFarland  was 
united  in  marriage  to  Miss  Margaret  T.  Day,  a  daughter  of  the  late  David 
and  Jane  Day  of  Ogdensburg,  New  York.  In  religious  faith  they  are  Anglicans, 
holding  membership  in  Christ  church.  Mr.  McFarland  is  a  conservative  in 
politics  but  has  never  been  an  active  worker  in  party  ranks.  He  is  a  charter 
member  of  the  Board  of  Trade  of  Vancouver  and  in  that  connection  has  been 
interested  in  many  movements  of  progressive  citizenship.  He  is  also  a  charter 
member  of  Cascade  Lodge,  A.  F.  &  A.  M.,  of  Vancouver  and  he  belongs  to  the 
Vancouver  Club,  the  Vancouver  Lawn  Tennis  Club,  the  Shaughnessy  Heights 
Golf  Club  and  is  president  of  the  Jericho  Country  Club,  all  of  Vancouver.  He 
is  likewise  a  member  of  the  Union  Club  of  Victoria.  During  the  twenty-nine 
years  of  his  residence  on  the  coast  he  has  witnessed  remarkable  changes  as  the 
work  of  development  and  civilization  has  been  carried  forward.  His  labors 
have  constituted  an  important  element  in  the  improvement  of  transportation 
conditions  by  rail  and  he  has  also  seen  a  marked  change  in  marine  transporta- 
tion, for  in  1885,  when  he  made  his  way  by  water  from  Victoria  to  Vancouver, 
he  left  the  former  city  at  seven  o'clock  in  the  morning  and  arrived  at  Sunny- 
side  Slip  at  nine  in  the  evening — a  trip  that  is  now  made  in  four  hours.  Along 
all  lines  of  improvement  the  changes  have  been  just  as  great,  and  Mr.  McFar- 
land's  name  stands  high  on  the  roll  of  those  who  have  contributed  much  to 
Vancouver's  upbuilding. 


JOHN    WALLACE  DE  BEQUE  FARRIS. 

John  Wallace  de  Beque  Farris,  a  barrister  of  Vancouver,  was  born  at 
Whites  Cove,  New  Brunswick,  a  son  of  Lochlan  P.  and  Louise  (Hay)  Farris, 
both  of  whom  were  natives  of  New  Brunswick,  in  which  country  the  father  was 
formerly  minister  of  agriculture,  but  is  now  living  retired.  His  grandfather  was 
the  Hon.  John  Farris,  Dominion  member  for  Queen's  county,  New  Brunswick, 
for  at  least  twenty  years. 

In  the  acquirement  of  his  education  J.  W.  de  B.  Farris  attended  successively 
the  public  schools  of  Whites  Cove,  St.  Martin's  Seminary,  Acadia  College,  from 
which  he  won  the  Bachelor  of  Arts  degree ;  and  the  University  of  Pennsylvania 
at  Philadelphia.  In  the  last  named  he  was  pursuing  the  law  course  in  prepara- 
tion for  practice  at  the  bar,  and  was  graduated  LL.  B.  in  1902.  In  his  school 
days  he  displayed  notable  native  oratorical  ability.  At  Acadia  he  took  part  in  the 


46  BRITISH    COLUMBIA 

annual  debate  of  1898  against  Kings  College,  and  in  1899  against  Dalhousie 
University,  on  both  of  which  occasions  Acadia  carried  off  the  honors.  Mr. 
Farris  headed  the  big  annual  intercollegiate  debate  of  1902  between  the  Penn- 
sylvania and  Michigan  State  Universities,  in  which  Pennsylvania  was  victorious. 
Nor  was  he  unknown  on  the  athletic  field,  for  while  at  Acadia  he  was  captain 
of  the  football  team. 

Returning  to  his  native  province  following  his  graduation  from  Pennsylvania 
University,  Mr.  Farris  at  once  entered  upon  the  active  practice  of  law  at  St. 
John,  New  Brunswick,  where  he  remained  for  six  months,  when,  thinking  the 
growing  western  country  offered  still  better  opportunities,  he  came  to  Vancouver 
in  the  spring  of  1903  and  entered  upon  active  practice  here.  He  was  prosecuting 
attorney  for  the  city  of  Vancouver  for  two  years,  or  from  1903  until  1905,  and 
was  a  candidate  for  the  provincial  legislature  on  the  liberal  ticket  in  1906  for  the 
city  of  Vancouver.  He  was  also  a  candidate  for  the  provincial  house  in  the  fall 
of  1909  for  the  Richmond  district.  He  has  always  been  a  stanch  liberal  and  is 
president  of  the  Vancouver  City  and  District  Liberal  Associations.  His  party  is 
now  in  the  minority,  rendering  it  difficult  to  win  an  election,  yet  Mr.  Farris, 
true  to  his  convictions,  stands  loyally  by  his  principles  and  is  a  recognized  leader 
in  party  ranks. 

In  Wolfville,  Nova  Scotia,  Mr.  Farris  was  married  on  August  16,  1905,  to 
Miss  Evelyn  Kierstad,  a  daughter  of  Professor  Kierstad  of  McMaster  University, 
Toronto.  Their  four  children  are  Katherine  Hay,  Donald  Fenwick,  Ralph  Kier- 
stad and  John  Lochlan.  Mr.  Farris  is  president  of  the  Vancouver  Acadia  Alumni 
Association  and  belongs  to  the  Terminal  City  and  Press  Clubs.  He  is  steadily 
working  his  way  upward  in  his  profession,  and  his  oratorical  ability,  clothing  the 
sound  logic  of  fact,  is  an  element  in  his  advancement. 


JOSEPH  A.  RUSSELL,  LL.  B. 

Joseph  A.  Russell  is  the  nestor  of  the  Vancouver  bar  and  ranks  second  to  no 
representative  of  the  legal  profession  in  this  city.  Honor  and  respect  are  accorded 
him  and  have  been  worthily  won,  and  there  is  none  whose  practice  more  fully 
embodies  the  high  ideals  of  the  profession  in  its  purpose  to  conserve  and  protect 
human  rights  and  liberties. 

Mr.  Russell  was  born  at  Newcastle,  New  Brunswick,  on  the  nth  of  Sep- 
tember, 1866.  He  is  a  son  of  Mathew  and  Sarah  Ann  Russell,  of  whom  more 
extended  mention  is  made  in  connection  with  the  sketch  of  F.  R.  McD.  Russell 
on  another  page  of  this  work.  He  supplemented  a  course  of  study  in  Harkins' 
Academy  at  Newcastle  by  a  course  in  Dalhousie  University,  in  Halifax,  Nova 
Scotia,  which  conferred  upon  him  the  LL.  B.  degree  in  1887.  He  was  a  law 
student  of  the  late  Hon.  A.  G.  Blair,  Q.  C,  and  was  called  to  the  bar  of  New 
Brunswick  in  October,  1887.  For  a  few  months  he  practiced  in  his  native  city 
and  then  came  to  British  Columbia  in  the  spring  of  1888,  making  his  way  direct 
to  Vancouver.  The  same  year  he  was  called  to  the  bar  of  this  province  and 
entered  upon  the  active  practice  of  his  profession  in  the  city  which  is  still  his 
home.  He  associated  himself  with  the  firm  of  Yates  &  Jay,  of  Victoria,  open- 
ing a  Vancouver  office  which  was  conducted  under  the  name  of  Yates,  Jay  & 
Russell.  A  year  later  he  purchased  the  interest  of  his  two  partners  and  con- 
tinued alone  in  practice  for  several  years.  He  was  then  joined  in  a  partnership 
by  the  late  J.  J.  Godfrey,  brother  of  William  Godfrey,  manager  of  the  Bank 
of  British  Columbia,  under  the  name  of  Russell  &  Godfrey.  In  1896  he  formed 
a  partnership  with  his  brother,  F.  R.  McD.  Russell,  under  the  style  of  Russell 
&  Russell,  and  on  the  admission  of  a  third  partner  the  firm  name  was  changed 
to  Russell,  Russell  &  Hannington,  so  continuing  until  1911,  when  Mr.  Hanning- 
ton's  health  compelled  him  to  limit  his  practice  to  his  former  field  at  Nelson, 
British  Columbia.  At  that  time  G.  E.  Hancox  was  taken  into  the  firm.  At  the 


JOSEPH  A.  RUSSELL 


BRITISH    COLUMBIA  49 

beginning  of  the  present  year  (1913)  Joseph  A.  Russell  retired  from  practice 
for  at  least  a  year's  rest,  and  the  firm  is  now  Russell,  MacDonald  &  Hancox  and 
Russell,  Mowat,  Hancox  &  Farris.  His  comprehensive  knowledge  of  the  law 
placed  J.  A.  Russell  among  the  men  of  eminent  learning  in  the  legal  profession, 
while  his  ability  to  accurately  apply  its  principles  gave  him  power  as  a  bar- 
rister and  counselor  that  placed  him  among  the  foremost  representatives  of 
the  profession  in  the  province,  particularly  in  matters  pertaining  to  marine, 
insurance,  shipping  and  criminal  law. 

For  nine  years  Mr.  Russell  filled  the  position  of  police  magistrate  of  the 
growing  city  of  Vancouver,  and  aside  from  duties  thus  directly  connected  with 
law  practice,  he  has  had  other  business  interests,  being  heavily  interested  in 
the  salmon  canning  industry  for  several  years.  For  a  long  time  he  has  been 
interested  in  timber,  holding  substantial  interests  in  two  large  lumber  com- 
panies, and  he  is  now  interested  in  other  industries,  including  the  Vancouver 
Ship  Yard,  Ltd.,  and  the  Burton-Shaw  Manufacturing  Company,  Ltd.  He 
owns  claims  and  is  very  active  in  coast  mining  for  gold  and  copper,  and  the 
keen  analytical  power  and  ready  discernment  of  the  lawyer  are  also  effective 
forces  in  recognizing  the  possibilities  of  a  business  situation  and  the  utilization 
of  these  possibilities  in  the  attainment  of  success.  Mr.  Russell  was  one  of 
those  who  conceived  the  idea  of  establishing  the  Vancouver  Horse  Show  and 
became  one  of  the  founders  and  active  promoters  of  the  association,  of  which 
he  has  been  a  director  and  an  exhibitor  from  its  inception. 

In  the  field  of  sports  Mr.  Russell  is  well  known,  and  for  many  years  was 
president  and  captain  of  the  Vancouver  Rowing  Club.  He  stroked  the  crew 
for  four  years  without  a  single  loss.  He  is  a  member  of  the  Vancouver  Tennis 
Club,  Vancouver  Athletic  Club,  and  was  for  some  time  president  of  the  Pacific 
Northwest  Amateur  Athletic  Association.  He  likewise  belongs  to  the  Brockton 
Point  Athletic  Club,  has  been  master  of  the  Vancouver  Hunt  Club  since  its  in- 
ception in  1886,  and  is  a  member  of  the  Canadian,  Vancouver,  Jericho  Country 
and  Minoru  Clubs.  He  is  a  recognized  leader  in  political  circles  and  deeply 
interested  in  civic  affairs  of  the  city  and  province,  but  owing  to  his  extensive 
practice  and  many  private  interests  he  has  not  found  time  to  become  openly 
identified  with  these.  He  is,  however,  a  close  student  of  the  signs  of  the  times 
and  of  the  vital  and  significant  questions  of  the  day,  and  his  opinions  upon  any 
such  point  elicit  interest  and  consideration. 

In  Vancouver,  in  1892,  Mr.  Russell  was  married  to  Miss  Jessie  Millar,  a 
daughter  of  James  Millar,  a  prominent  merchant  of  Halifax,  Nova  Scotia,  and 
they  have  one  child,  Flora  McDonald  Russell,  who  has  been  an  exhibitor  at  the 
horse  show  for  the  past  six  years.  Such,  in  brief,  is  the  life  history  of  Joseph 
A.  Russell,  whose  prominence  as  a  man  and  as  a  citizen  is  unquestioned,  while 
public  opinion  places  him  in  the  front  rank  among  the  barristers  of  Vancouver 
and  the  province. 


WILLIAM  J.   MATHERS. 

William  J.  Mathers  is  local  manager  for  the  Brachman-Ker  Milling  Company 
at  New  Westminster  and  by  virtue  of  his  position  and  the  force  of  his  ability  and 
personality  one  of  the  important  elements  in  the  industrial  growth  of  the  city.  A 
spirit  of  enterprise  and  progress  actuates  him  in  all  that  he  does,  and  his  success 
is  the  natural  reward  of  his  energy,  progressiveness  and  business  discrimination. 
He  was  born  at  St.  Helen's,  Ontario,  in  Huron  county,  in  1862,  and  is  a  son  of 
Henry  and  Mary  Mathers. 

William  J.  Mathers  acquired  his  education  in  the  public  schools  of  his  native 
community  and  remained  in  Ontario  until  he  was  fourteen  years  of  age,  at  which 
time  he  came  to  British  Columbia,  settling  in  New  Westminster,  where  he  has 
since  made  his  home.  He  is  numbered  among  the  early  settlers  and  has  always 


50  BRITISH    COLUMBIA 

thoroughly  identified  his  interests  with  those  of  the  city.  He  began  his  business 
career  as  clerk  in  a  general  store,  and  from  that  position  rose  through  successive 
stages  of  progress  and  advancement,  and  through  the  force  of  his  ability,  energy 
and  enterprise,  to  be  local  manager  of  the  Brachman-Ker  Milling  Company,  one 
of  the  most  important  enterprises  of  its  kind  in  the  city.  He  has  proved  capable, 
far-sighted  and  reliable  in  the  discharge  of  his  responsible  duties,  and  the  great 
growth  of  the  concern  in  the  past  few  years  is  largely  due  to  him.  Always  a 
public-spirited  and  progressive  citizen,  Mr.  Mathers  has  taken  a  deep  and  intelli- 
gent interest  in  general  business  growth  and  did  much  to  promote  it  while  presi- 
dent of  the  New  Westminster  Board  of  Trade  in  1905. 

Mr.  Mathers  married  Miss  Mary  E.  Whelen  of  New  Westminster  and  they 
have  three  children,  one  son  and  two  daughters.  The  family  are  well  known  in 
social  circles  of  the  city  and  have  an  extensive  and  representative  circle  of 
friends. 


HENRY  DAVIS. 

In  pioneer  times  Henry  Davis  settled  near  Langley,  on  the  Eraser  river,  and 
during  the  many  years  which  elapsed  from  that  period  until  the  time  of  his  death 
he  remained  an  active  and  honored  citizen  of  this  locality.  To  him  the  section 
owes  the  development  of  one  of  the  finest  farms  in  this  part  of  British  Columbia 
and  many  other  valuable  contributions  to  its  growth  and  progress  and  thus  it 
was  that  in  his  passing  it  lost  a  valued,  useful  and  representative  citizen.  In  the 
course  of  years  his  business  interests  became  extensive  and  yet  he  did  not  allow 
the  accumulation  of  wealth  to  mar  his  kindly  nature,  his  courtesy  and  his  geniality 
and  he  was  never  known  to  take  advantage  of  the  necessities  of  others  in  any 
business  transaction. 

Mr.  Davis  was  born  in  Ireland,  March  15,  1848,  and  is  a  son  of  James  and 
Susannah  Davis,  the  former  a  substantial  farmer  of  Derrylane,  County  Cavan. 
In  that  section  of  the  Emerald  isle  Henry  Davis  spent  his  childhood  but  when 
he  was  eleven  years  of  age  he  crossed  the  Atlantic  to  America,  settling  in  Well- 
ington county,  Ontario.  There  he  grew  to  manhood,  gaining  during  this  time  a 
knowledge  of  the  best  and  most  effective  agricultural  methods,  and  about  a 
quarter  of  a  century  before  his  death  moved  to  British  Columbia,  where  he  long 
remained  an  honored  and  respected  citizen.  For  a  number  of  years  he  engaged 
in  contracting  on  some  of  the  roads  which  were  built  early  in  the  history  of  the 
settlement  of  the  section  around  Langley  but  he  afterward  turned  his  attention 
to  farming  near  Langley,  developing  an  extensive  and  productive  ranch  which 
for  over  twenty  years  he  continued  to  improve  and  cultivate,  a  substantial  fortune 
accruing  from  his  well  directed  labors.  He  became  one  of  the  most  extensive 
landowners  and  prosperous  ranchers  in  this  locality,  owning  besides  his  home 
farm  another  tract  in  the  Surrey  municipality,  and  he  made  his  name  honored 
and  respected  as  a  synonym  not  only  for  successful  accomplishment  but  for 
high  standards  of  business  and  personal  honor. 

On  the  6th  of  January,  1892,  at  Hollen,  Ontario,  Mr.  Davis  was  united  in 
marriage  to  Miss  Lizzie  Henderson,  a  daughter  of  George  and  Harriet  Hender- 
son, the  former  a  mill  owner  and  farmer  in  that  vicinity.  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Davis 
became  the  parents  of  three  children,  Margaret,  Leslie  and  Roy,  who  live  with 
their  mother  at  New  Westminster. 

Mr.  Davis  was  a  devout  member  of  the  Methodist  church  and  he  gave  his 
political  allegiance  to  the  conservative  party,  being  stanch  in  his  support  of  its 
principles  and  policies  although  never  active  as  an  office  seeker.  He  died  upon 
his  ranch,  January  13,  1901,  and  his  passing  was  widely  and  deeply  regretted 
in  a  community  where  he  had  made  his  home  for  over  a  quarter  of  a  century 
and  where  his  many  excellent  qualities  had  endeared  him  to  all  who  came  within 
the  close  circle  of  his  friendship.  If  success  means  a  long  and  useful  life,  a 


HENRY   DAVIS 


BRITISH    COLUMBIA  53 

peaceful  and  contented  fireside,  steadily  increasing  prosperity  in  business  and 
growing  esteem  among  neighbors  and  associates,  then  Mr.  Davis  has  been  a 
successful  man,  as  he  was  a  worthy,  honorable  and  useful  citizen. 


HENRY  MCDOWELL. 

Henry  McDowell  has  for  a  number  of  years  been  prominently  identified  with 
various  important  commercial  lines  in  Vancouver  and  the  Canadian  northwest, 
having  been  for  a  long  time  associated  with  the  wholesale  drug  business,  but  at 
present  he  gives  his  whole  time  to  his  important  duties  as  president  of  the 
McDowell-Mouat  Coal  Company.  There  is  no  better  evidence  of  the  position 
which  he  occupies  relative  to  his  importance  in  the  commercial  life  of  the  city 
than  the  fact  that  he  served  in  the  position  of  president  of  the  Board  of  Trade, 
in  which  office  he  had  decided  influence  upon  the  growth  and  commercial  expan- 
sion of  the  city.  He  has  distinct  claim  upon  the  title  of  pioneer  of  the  city,  and 
by  his  own  efforts  has  become  one  of  its  most  successful  business  men  who  has 
let  no  opportunity  pass  which  would  lead  to  the  advancement  and  phenomenal 
prosperity  that  it  has  been  the  fortune  of  Vancouver  to  enjoy.  His  life  record 
and  that  of  the  city  are  closely  intertwined  and  it  may  be  said  of  him  that  each 
has  contributed  to  the  other's  benefit. 

Henry  McDowell  was  born  in  Milton,  Halton  county,  Ontario,  on  the  3d  of 
March,  1862,  a  son  of  Robert  McDowell,  a  native  of  Ireland,  whose  ambitious 
spirit  would  not  let  him  be  content  with  the  easy-going,  Irish  country  life,  and 
decided  him  to  emigrate  to  Canada  in  1849,  to  grow  up  with  the  development 
of  a  new  country  and  here  he  followed  successfully  agricultural  pursuits  until 
his  death  in  1864,  when  only  in  his  thirty-sixth  year.  He  married,  in  the  isle 
of  Erin,  Mary  Ann  Doherty,  who  first  saw  the  light  of  day  near  the  birthplace 
where  her  future  husband  had  been  born.  Her  death  occurred  in  1891,  when  she 
was  sixty-three  years  old.  Both  were  devout  adherents  of  the  Episcopal  church 
and  were  pious  and  God-fearing  people,  greatly  respected  in  the  community 
where  they  lived  for  their  high  qualities  of  mind  and  character.  Their  son, 
Henry,  and  his  sister,  Mrs.  Charles  H.  Mouat,  were  the  only  ones  of  the  family 
to  come  to  Vancouver,  and  both  are  still  residents  of  this  city. 

Henry  McDowell  received  a  public-school  education  and  after  laying  aside  his 
text-books  began  to  learn  the  drug  trade  in  his  native  town.  In  1884,  however,  he 
left  Milton  and  removed  to  Port  Arthur,  where  for  two  years  he  was  connected 
as  clerk  with  the  office  force  of  O'Connor  &  Company.  In  1886,  not  long  after  the 
fatal  conflagration,  Mr.  McDowell  came  to  Vancouver,  and  for  that  reason  he 
must  be  accounted  one  of  its  real  pioneers,  as  all  that  had  been  here  in  the  way 
of  a  town  had  been  destroyed  by  the  fire  demon  and  the  rebirth  of  the  city  may 
truly  be  called  the  beginning  of  the  Vancouver  of  today.  Upon  his  arrival  he 
opened  a  drug  store,  and  success  attended  him  from  the  beginning,  as  his  busi- 
ness interests  reached  out  and  grew  with  the  rapid  advancement  of  the  city. 
His  drug  store  was  the  first  one  to  open  after  the  fire,  and  he  continued  it  until 
1891  alone,  when  he  was  joined  in  partnership  by  H.  H.  Watson,  which  was 
productive  of  many  excellent  results,  and  continued  until  1895,  when  the  firm 
was  merged  with  that  of  Atkins  &  Atkins  and  became  the  McDowell-Atkins- 
Watson  Company.  They  largely  widened  the  scope  of  their  activities  by  opening 
as  many  as  eleven  different  stores  on  such  corners  of  the  city  that  offered  the 
best  inducements.  They  also  maintained  a  wholesale  business,  which  in  1902 
was  merged  with  that  of  Henderson  Brothers  of  Victoria,  and  the  wholesale 
branch  continued  under  the  name  of  Henderson  Brothers,  Ltd.,  one  of  the 
largest  and  foremost  firms  of  its  kind  in  the  Dominion,  the  business  being  later 
taken  over  by  the  National  Drug  Company  of  Canada  and  discontinued  at 
Vancouver.  In  his  later  years  the  interests  of  Mr.  McDowell  have  extended  to 
other  important  commercial  enterprises  of  the  town,  among  which  one  of  the 


54 

most  important  is  the  McDowell-Motiat  Coal  Company,  Ltd.,  located  at  724 
Hastings  street,  West,  Vancouver,  of  which  he  is  the  chief  executive  officer, 
and  to  which  he  now  devotes  his  whole  attention. 

In  1890  Mr.  McDowell  was  united  in  marriage  to  Miss  Dell  Clarke,  a 
daughter  of  Edward  Clarke,  of  Pembroke,  Ontario,  and  of  Irish  descent.  In 
their  family  are  three  children:  Mary  Emily,  Robert  Clarke  and  Dell  McLaren. 
One  of  the  most  attractive  residences  of  the  city  is  the  home  of  the  family  and 
its  elegant  rooms  often  see  the  company  of  their  many  friends,  who  delight  to 
partake  of  the  warm  hospitality  Mr.  and  Mrs.  McDowell  dispense.  Their 
religious  affiliations  are  with  the  Church  of  England,  to  which  they  give  their 
moral  and  material  support  in  unstinted  measure.  As  a  member  of  the  Board 
of  Trade  Mr.  McDowell  has  often  raised  his  voice  in  indorsement  of  important 
measures  which  have  greatly  contributed  toward  the  commercial  expansion  of  the 
city,  and  other  interests  of  his  life  are  such  that  they  have  materially  contributed 
toward  betterment  and  improvement  along  various  lines.  He  is  conceded  to  be 
one  of  the  foremost  and  substantial  men  of  the  community  and  all  those  who 
have  the  pleasure  of  his  acquaintance  delight  to  do  him  honor  as  a  pioneer  and  as 
a  man  who  has  attained  his  goal  without  ever  having  to  endanger  his  principles 
of  uprightness  and  one  who  has  attained  financial  independence  in  conformity 
with  the  tenets  of  the  Golden  Rule. 


WALFORD  DOUGLAS  SOMERLED  RORISON. 

Walford  Douglas  Somerled  Rorison  is  well  and  prominently  known  in  busi- 
ness life  of  Vancouver  as  vice  president  of  R.  D.  Rorison  &  Son,  Ltd.,  and  in 
military  circles  of  British  Columbia  as  one  of  the  most  distinguished,  efficient 
and  able  officers  in  the  Canadian  Army  Service  Corps,  also  being  commissioner 
of  the  Boy  Scouts  for  the  mainland  of  the  province.  The  basis  of  his  success 
has  been  the  same  in  both  lines — natural  talents  and  powers  well  developed  along 
constructive  and  modern  lines,  a  keen,  incisive  and  liberal  mind,  sound  and  prac- 
tical judgment,  and  these  qualities,  dominating  his  character,  have  made  him 
one  of  the  best  known  and  most  representative  men  in  the  city  of  Vancouver  at 
the  present  time.  He  was  born  in  Renfrew,  Ontario,  on  the  I5th  of  October, 
1877,  and  is  a  son  of  Robert  Douglas  and  Charlotte  (Walford)  Rorison, 
extended  mention  of  whom  will  be  found  on  another  page  in  this  volume. 

Walford  D.  S.  Rorison  acquired  his  education  in  the  public  schools  of  Ren- 
frew, Ontario,  and  Winnipeg,  Manitoba,  and  at  Manitoba  College  in  Winnipeg. 
He  came  to  Vancouver,  British  Columbia,  in  1899  DUt>  having  determined  to 
follow  the  profession  of  a  mining  engineer,  went  to  Longboro  Inlet,  where  for  a 
year  he  was  associated  with  the  Cuba  Silver  Mining  Company  as  assistant  to 
the  engineer  in  charge.  At  the  end  of  that  time  he  returned  to  Vancouver  and 
took  up  the  study  of  law,  in  which  he  continued  for  one  year.  However,  his 
father's  business  had  in  the  meantime  grown  to  a  point  where  it  required  more 
time  and  attention  than  Robert  D.  Rorison  could  give  it  personally  and  he  accord- 
ingly persuaded  his  son  to  give  up  the  idea  of  a  professional  life  and  to  cast  his 
lot  along  business  lines.  The  association  between  father  and  son  which  was 
then  formed  continues  to  the  present  time  and  has  been  productive  of  excellent 
results.  The  business  was  first  conducted  under  the  name  of  R.  D.  Rorison  & 
Son  and  was  later  incorporated  as  R.  D.  Rorison  &  Son,  Ltd.,  with  Mr.  Rorison 
of  this  review  as  vice  president.  The  various  projects  promoted  and  operated 
by  this  company  are  given  extended  mention  in  the  biography  of  Robert  Douglas 
Rorison  in  this  work.  The  son  has  been  a  helpful  factor  in  the  building  up 
of  the  concern,  in  the  establishment  of  the  policies  which  have  made  it  great, 
and  he  has  shown  conclusively  that  his  choice  of  a  life  work  was  a  fortunate 
one,  his  business  ability  being  of  an  unusual  order.  Situations  calling  for  execu- 
tive power,  for  quickness  of  action,  for  comprehensive  grasp  of  detail  are  handled 


WALFORD  D.  S.  RORISON 


BRITISH    COLUMBIA  57 

by  him  in  a  systematic  and  able  way  and  his  developing  powers  have  aided 
greatly  in  the  building  up  of  the  great  concern  with  which  he  is  connected  and 
also  in  the  promotion  of  general  business  activity  in  Vancouver. 

It  is  not  alone  along  business  lines,  however,  that  Mr.  Rorison  has  done 
splendid  work,  for  from  an  early  date  in  his  career  he  has  been  interested  in 
military  affairs  and  is  today  one  of  the  most  distinguished  and  able  army  officers 
in  western  Canada.  As  a  boy  he  was  captain  and  drill  master  of  his  schoolmates 
and  while  at  college  he  kept  up  his  interest  in  military  affairs  and  in  athletics  as 
a  means  of  military  supremacy.  After  coming  to  Vancouver  he  became  actively 
associated  with  the  militia  and  enlisted  as  a  private  in  D  Company,  Sixth  Regi- 
ment, Duke  of  Connaught's  Own  Rifles.  He  rapidly  passed  the  various  examina- 
tions and  went  through  all  the  ranks  of  non-commissioned  officers  and  in  1907 
took  at  the  same  time  the  examinations  for  the  ranks  of  lieutenant  and  captain, 
being  granted  his  certificates  on  the  4th  of  July  of  the  same  year.  His  warrant 
was  signed  by  Earl  Grey,  September  26,  1907,  and  he  received  his  equitation 
certificate  January  10,  of  the  following  year,  taking  active  command  of  D  Com- 
pany, Sixth  Regiment,  in  which  he  had  originally  enlisted  as  a  private.  This 
command  he  resigned  in  1911  and  was  put  on  the  Corps  of  Reserve  of  D  Com- 
pany, later  taking  command  of  H  Company  of  the  same  regiment.  Again  he 
went  on  the  Corps  of  Reserve  and  in  January,  1913,  attended  the  school  of 
instruction  for  the  Canadian  Army  Service  Corps,  passing  the  lieutenant's  and 
captain's  examinations  and  being  granted  his  equitation  certificate  on  the  loth 
of  May,  1913.  After  the  camp,  which  was  concluded  June  14,  1913,  he  was 
transferred  to  D  Squadron,  Thirty-first  British  Columbia  Horse,  with  instruc- 
tions from  Lieutenant  Colonel  Charles  Flick  to  organize  the  first  troop  of  cav- 
alry on  the  lower  mainland  at  Eburn,  British  Columbia. 

As  an  officer  Mr.  Rorison  has  been  very  efficient  and  capable,  for  he  possesses 
the  necessary  executive  and  administrative  ability  and  power  of  control,  combined 
with  the  personal  characteristics  which  make  for  popularity  among  his  men 
and  with  his  superior  officers  as  well.  These  latter  respect  and  admire  his 
undoubted  ability  and  he  has  received  many  marks  of  honor  and  distinction  in 
recognition  of  his  constructive  and  able  military  service.  Though  a  junior 
officer,  he  was  appointed  to  command  a  company  at  the  military  maneuvers  held 
in  connection  with  the  tercentenary  celebration  at  Quebec  in  1908,  being  the 
only  officer  appointed  from  the  mainland  of  British  Columbia  to  represent  the 
infantry  at  that  celebration.  This  was  a  high  tribute  to  Mr.  Rorison's  efficiency 
as  an  officer  and  was  accorded  to  him  in  recognition  of  definite  work  which  he 
had  accomplished  along  organizing  lines. 

In  1910  Mr.  Rorison  became  interested  in  the  Boy  Scout  movement  and 
active  in  the  work  of  that  organization  in  Vancouver.  In  the  following  year  he 
had  the  pleasure  of  entertaining  in  his  home  Lieutenant  General  Sir  Robert 
Stephenson  Smyth  Baden-Powell,  who  in  1908,  on  his  first  visit  to  British 
Columbia,  organized  the  Boy  Scouts  in  this  province.  From  him  Mr.  Rorison 
obtained  at  first  hand  complete  information  on  the  objects  and  ideals  of  the 
organization  and  this  greatly  stimulated  his  interest  and  activity,  so  that  in  the 
fall  of  1911,  upon  the  resignation  of  Major  Tite  as  commissioner  of  the  Boy 
Scouts  for  the  mainland  of  British  Columbia,  he  succeeded  the  latter  in  that 
office  and  so  continues  to  the  present  time,  having  a  record  for  constructive  and 
systematic  work  along  this  line  which  cannot  be  surpassed  in  the  Dominion. 
When  he  took  charge  in  1911  there  were  only  seventy-five  boys  who  were  active 
members  of  the  Scouts,  while  at  the  present  time  there  are  three  hundred  on  the 
active  list  in  the  cities  of  Vancouver  and  North  Vancouver  alone.  On  Lieutenant 
General  Sir  Robert  Baden-Powell's  last  visit  to  the  province  he  praised  highly 
Mr.  Rorison's  work  and  recommended  its  continuance  along  the  lines  on  which 
it  had  been  begun,  for  he  recognized  the  organizing  ability  of  Major  Tite's 
successor  and  his  thorough  efficiency  in  the  work. 

On  the  8th  of  July,  1908,  Mr.  Rorison  was  united  in  marriage  to  Miss  Lucy 
Wyman  Wright,  of  Renfrew,  Ontario,  a  daughter  of  Orange  Wright,  a  native 


58  BRITISH    COLUMBIA 

of  that  city,  where  he  is  serving  as  a  customs  official.  The  Wright  family  came 
from  England  to  America  in  colonial  times,  settling  at  Boston,  where  they 
resided  for  a  number  of  years.  They,  however,  were  United  Empire  Loyalists 
and  during  the  American  revolution  moved  to  Canada,  settling  as  pioneers  in 
Ottawa  valley,  Ontario.  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Rorison  have  two  children:  Charlotte 
Amy  Wright,  who  was  born  May  19,  1909;  and  Robert  Douglas,  born  April 
28,  1911. 

Mr.  Rorison  is  a  member  of  St.  John's  Presbyterian  church  and  is  connected 
fraternally  with  the  Independent  Order  of  Odd  Fellows,  belonging  to  the  Ren- 
frew, Ontario,  lodge,  of  which  his  father  is  a  charter  member.  A  man  of  forceful 
personality,  varied  interests,  keen  and  well  developed  qualities  of  mind,  he  is 
recognized  as  one  of  Vancouver's  representative  citizens,  the  value  of  whose 
work  along  military  and  business  lines  it  is  almost  impossible  to  estimate.  By 
reason  of  the  mature  judgment  which  characterizes  all  of  his  efforts  he  stands 
today  as  a  splendid  type  of  the  prominent  capitalist  and  man  of  affairs  to  whom 
business  is  but  one  phase  of  life  and  does  not  exclude  active  participation  in 
the  many  other  vital  interests  which  go  to  make  up  the  sum  of  human  existence. 


DAVID  E.  BROWN. 

Since  starting  in  the  business  world  David  E.  Brown  has  advanced  step  by 
step,  overcoming  all  difficulties  and  obstacles  and  achieving  success  through 
merit  and  ability.  He  is  now  president  of  D.  E.  Brown,  Hope  &  Macaulay,  Lim- 
ited, in  which  connection  he  has  won  for  the  company  a  creditable  and  enviable 
reputation  in  the  insurance,  loan,  investment  and  real-estate  field.  His  knowledge 
of  matters  essential  along  those  lines  is  comprehensive  and  exact,  and  with  added 
executive  force  he  has  gained  a  large  and  desirable  clientage.  The  place  of  his 
nativity  was  Owen  Sound,  Ontario,  and  the  date,  March  20,  1855,  his  parents 
being  George  and  Margaret  Brown.  After  attending  public  school  at  Owen 
Sound  and  Fergus,  Ontario,  Mr.  Brown  sought  and  obtained  employment  with 
the  Great  Western  Railway  in  Canada,  being  connected  with  that  corporation  for 
five  or  six  years.  He  continued  in  railway  work  with  the  Hamilton  &  Northwest- 
ern until  that  corporation  was  absorbed  by  the  Northern  Railway  of  Canada,  and 
the  system  was  called  the  Northern  &  Northwestern  Railway  of  Canada,  for 
whom  he  continued  as  agent,  traveling  auditor,  cashier  and  accountant  at  the  lake 
ports,  thus  serving  until  1883.  In  the  latter  year  he  accepted  the  position  of  local 
freight  agent  for  the  Canadian  Pacific  at  Winnipeg,  continuing  so  until  1886,  when 
he  was  transferred  to  Vancouver,  British  Columbia,  as  district  freight  and  passen- 
ger agent.  He  subsequently  became  assistant  general  freight  and  passenger  agent 
of  western  lines,  his  jurisdiction  extending  east  as  far  as  Port  Arthur  and  Fort 
William.  In  1892  he  became  general  agent  for  the  Canadian  Pacific  in  the  Orient, 
and  for  fourteen  years  did  important  work  for  the  company  in  that  section  of  the 
globe  as  general  manager  for  Asia,  with  headquarters  at  Hong  Kong.  Returning 
to  Vancouver  in  1906,  he  became  general  superintendent  of  the  company's  Pacific 
steamers,  holding  that  office  for  one  year.  Upon  his  retirement  on  a  pension  from 
the  Canadian  Pacific  in  1907,  following  twenty-four  years  in  the  service  of  that 
corporation,  he  established  himself  as  an  insurance  and  financial  broker  in  Van- 
couver, also  doing  a  general  railroad  and  steamship  business,  organizing  the  firm 
of  D.  E.  Brown  &  Company.  For  a  year  the  business  was  conducted  under  that 
style  and  was  then  incorporated  as  D.  E.  Brown  &  Macaulay,  Ltd.,  and  reorganized 
in  1913,  under  the  style  of  D.  E.  Brown,  Hope  &  Macaulay,  Limited.  Mr.  Brown 
was  elected  president  of  the  company  and  he  is  still  filling  that  position.  As  its 
chief  executive  officer  he  controls  and  directs  the  policy  of  the  firm  which  has 
gained  a  substantial  position  in  connection  with  insurance,  loans  and  investments, 
and  also  has  operated  in  the  real-estate  field.  They  handle  for  the  Canadian 
Pacific  Irrigation  Colonization  Company,  farm  lands  in  British  Columbia,  Alberta, 


DAVID  E.  BROWN 


BRITISH    COLUMBIA  61 

Manitoba  and  Saskatchewan.  They  are  passenger  agents  also  for  the  Canadian 
Pacific  Company's  railway  and  steamship  lines,  doing  a  general  railway  and  steam- 
ship passenger  business  as  agents  for  all  trans-Atlantic  and  Pacific  lines.  They 
are  also  passenger  agents  for  the  Southern  and  Union  Pacific,  the  Oregon  Short 
Line,  and  the  Oregon- Washington  Railroad  &  Navigation  Company,  better  known 
under  the  name  of  the  "Harriman  system."  They  maintain  a  branch  office  in 
London,  England,  and  their  business  along  these  lines  is  so  large  that  the 
firm  is  conceded  to  be  one  of  the  foremost  in  the  province.  Aside  from  the  activi- 
ties of  the  company,  Mr.  Brown  owns  individually  considerable  real  estate  in 
British  Columbia. 

The  political  indorsement  of  Mr.  Brown  is  given  to  the  conservative  party. 
He  has  for  a  considerable  period  been  identified  with  the  Masonic  fraternity,  in 
which  he  has  taken  the  degrees  of  the  Scottish  Rite.  He  is  an  Anglican  in  relig- 
ious faith.  Mr.  Brown  is  a  prominent  club  man,  being  a  member  of  the  Terminal 
City,  Vancouver,  Shaughnessy  Heights  Golf  and  Vancouver  Country  Clubs  of 
Vancouver;  the  St.  James  Club,  of  Montreal;  and  the  Thatched  House  Club, 
of  London.  Mr.  Brown  resides  at  Shaughnessy  Heights. 


WILLIAM  ARTHUR  DASHWOOD-JONES. 

William  Arthur  Dashwood- Jones,  for  twenty-one  years  a  representative  of 
the  provincial  government  in  various  official  positions,  has  since  the  ist  of  August, 
1908,  served  as  deputy  provincial  assessor.  In  every  connection  his  record  has 
been  marked  by  a  patriotic  devotion  to  the  general  good  and  in  the  discharge 
of  his  duties  he  has  ever  placed  the  public  welfare  before  personal  aggrandize- 
ment. He  was  born  March  25,  1858,  at  Kinson,  Dorset,  England,  a  son  of 
Captain  Dashwood- Jones,  R.  A.,  and  Annie  Selina  (Waters)  Dash  wood- Jones, 
both  of  whom  passed  away  many  years  ago.  The  paternal  grandfather  was 
General  W.  D.  Jones,  R.  A.,  a  veteran  of  the  Crimean  and  Peninsular  wars  and 
related  to  several  of  the  oldest  families  in  England.  The  elder  branch  of  the 
family  lives  at  Craner  Hall,  Fakenham,  Norfolk,  England. 

William  A.  Dashwood- Jones  pursued  his  education  in  the  Wimborne  grammar 
school  and  in  the  University  College  School  of  London,  preparing  for  Cam- 
bridge. He  did  not  graduate,  however,  but  left  that  institution  at  the  age  of 
seventeen  years  on  account  of  the  loss  of  his  income.  On  the  3d  of  March,  1876, 
he  left  his  native  land,  then  a  youth  of  eighteen  years,  and  on  the  2ist  of  April, 
following,  arrived  in  Nanaimo,  British  Columbia,  where  he  remained  for  some 
time  with  an  uncle,  the  late  Archdeacon  Mason,  and  his  family.  For  a  short 
time  he  engaged  in  farming  in  Cowichan  and  later  traveled  about.  He  put  in  a 
season  on  the  Skeena  at  Turner  Beeton's  cannery,  also  at  a  cannery  on  the  Fraser 
at  Canoe  Pass,  previous  to  taking  up  the  work  of  railway  construction  in  the 
beginning  of  1880.  He  joined  the  Dominion  government  staff  of  engineers  on 
Canadian  Pacific  Railway  construction  as  rodman  and  subsequently  was  made 
secretary  to  H.  A.  F.  MacLeod,  resident  engineer  near  Spences  Bridge  in 
December.,  1880,  and  left  there  in  1885  to  join  the  British  Columbia  Express 
Company.  When  the  Dominion  Express  Company  took  over  their  railway  work 
he  was  in  their  employ  for  a  year.  In  1887  he  embarked  in  business  on  his 
own  account  as  a  dealer  in  produce  in  New  Westminster,  and  so  continued  until 
1892,  when  the  hard  times  compelled  him  to  withdraw  from  that  field  of  com- 
merce. He  shipped  the  first  fresh  salmon  across  the  Rocky  mountains  over  the 
Canadian  Pacific  soon  after  through  trains  were  put  upon  that  line. 

•  In  1893  Mr-  Dashwood-Jones  entered  the  service  of  the  provincial  govern- 
ment and  is  still  in  that  employ.  On  the  ist  of  May,  1893,  ne  was  appointed 
clerk  in  the  land  registry  office  for  the  provincial  government.  On  the  ist  of 
May,  1905,  he  was  made  revenue  tax  collector  and  clerk  in  the  provincial 
assessor's  office,  and  on  the  ist  of  August,  1908,  was  promoted  to  the  position 


62  BRITISH    COLUMBIA 

of  deputy  provincial  assessor.  He  was  also  school  trustee  of  the  city  of  New 
Westminster  in  1903  and  1904,  and  the  cause  of  education  found  in  him  a  stal- 
wart champion,  ready  to  promote  any  activity  or  adopt  any  project  that  would 
advance  the  best  interests  of  the  schools  of  the  city.  In  all  of  his  official 
positions  he  has  been  prompt,  faithful  and  capable  in  the  discharge  of  his  duties, 
and  the  excellent  record  he  has  made  is  attested  by  the  fact  that  he  has  been 
retained  in  the  employ  of  the  provincial  government  through  two  decades. 

On  the  1 6th  of  March,  1886,  at  Spences  Bridge,  Mr.  Dashwood-Jones  was 
married  to  Miss  Jennie  Anne  Clemes,  a  daughter  of  the  late  William  Clemes,  a 
farmer  of  Manitoba  and  a  representative  of  a  Cornish  family  that  was  estab- 
lished in  Canada  about  a  half  century  ago.  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Dashwood-Jones  are  the 
parents  of  five  children:  Edith  Mary,  now  the  wife  of  Maitland  Shore, 
Canadian  Pacific  Railway  agent  at  Merritt,  British  Columbia ;  Grace  Constance ; 
Stewart  Lawrence,  a  law  student  with  Milton  Price,  barrister  of  Vancouver; 
Ellen  Kathleen;  and  Victor  Neville.  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Dashwood-Jones  hold  mem- 
bership in  the  English  church,  being  identified  with  the  congregation  of  St. 
Alban's  at  Burnaby.  In  politics  he  has  always  been  a  conservative.  He  belongs 
to  the  New  Westminster  Club  and  he  is  a  past  master  of  King  Solomon  Lodge, 
No.  17,  A.  F.  &  A.  M.,  and  a  member  of  Rose  of  Columbia  Lodge  of  the  Sons 
of  England.  For  a  number  of  years  he  has  been  a  director  in  the  Royal  Agri- 
cultural and  Industrial  Society  of  New  Westminster  and  is  extremely  active  in 
horticultural  circles.  He  has  ever  taken  the  deepest  interest  in  horticulture  and 
its  promotion.  About  five  years  ago  he  met  with  a  severe  accident  through  a 
cut  with  a  pane  of  glass  in  his  greenhouse,  which  almost  totally  disabled  his 
right  hand.  Within  two  months,  however,  he  learned  to  write  with  his  left  hand, 
and  has  continued  to  work  in  his  official  connection  to  the  present  time.  His 
interest  in  horticulture  has  been  a  salient  feature  in  his  life  for  many  years, 
and  he  is  today  well  known  at  most  of  the  floral  shows  as  a  successful  exhibitor 
and  frequently  acts  in  the  capacity  of  judge  when  not  exhibiting.  He  thoroughly 
understands  the  scientific  as  well  as  the  practical  phases  of  horticulture  and  his 
efforts  along  that  line  constitute  an  even  balance  to  his  activity  in  his  official 
connections. 


ALEXANDER  PEERS. 

Among  the  men  who  were  active  in  inaugurating  and  shaping  the  agricultural 
development  of  the  section  around  New  Westminster  was  numbered  Alexander 
Peers,  one  of  the  first  to  preempt  land  in  this  locality  and  who  for  many  years 
was  known  as  a  successful  and  able  farmer.  His  death,  therefore,  on  the  I2th 
of  November,  1899,  deprived  the  region  of  one  of  its  real  pioneers  and,  although 
the  later  years  of  his  life  were  spent  in  retirement,  his  contributions  to  general  de- 
velopment and  growth  were  important  and  substantial. 

Mr.  Peers  was  born  in  Woodstock,  Ontario,  in  1837,  and  was  a  son  of  William 
and  Hulda  Peers,  the  former  a  prosperous  and  substantial  farmer  in  that  prov- 
ince. In  the  acquirement  of  an  education  Alexander  Peers  attended  public  school 
in  Woodstock  and  later  entered  Victoria  College  at  Cobourg.  He  afterwards  ob- 
tained his  teachers'  certificate  and  for  some  time  engaged  in  teaching  in  eastern 
Canada,  coming  west  about  1869  with  the  determination  to  seek  his  fortune  in  the 
newly  developed  province  of  British  Columbia.  After  his  arrival  he  preempted 
land  at  Chilliwack  and  remained  in  that  vicinity  for  about  thirteen  years,  turning 
his  attention  to  agricultural  pursuits.  He  engaged  in  general  farming  and  stock- 
raising  and  success  steadily  attended  his  well  directed  and  practical  labors  until  he 
became  finally  one  of  the  representative,  substantial  and  prosperous  agriculturists 
in  that  vicinity.  Eventually,  however,  he  sold  his  ranch  and  came  to  New  West- 
minster when  it  was  a  mere  village,  buying  property  and  engaging  in  poultry 
raising  and  gardening.  He  followed  this  occupation  not  so  much  in  order  to  gain 


ALEXANDEE  PEEKS 


MARGARET  PEERS 


BRITISH    COLUMBIA  67 

a  livelihood  as  that  he  might  be  active,  as  idleness  was  irksome  to  him  and  after 
he  had  abandoned  it,  he  lived  retired  in  New  Westminster,  where  he  became 
widely  and  favorably  known  as  a  man  of  genuine  personal  worth,  effective  public 
spirit  and  high  standards  of  business  and  personal  integrity. 

On  the  3ist  of  May,  1874,  Mr.  Peers  married  Miss  Margaret  Wells,  a  daughter 
of  Allen  and  Martha  Wells.  Mrs.  Peers  survives  her  husband  and  makes  her 
home  in  New  Westminster.  She  is  a  descendant  of  old  United  Empire  Loyalist 
stock  and  as  a  young  woman  came  to  British  Columbia,  watching  through  the 
years  the  great  change  which  has  practically  transformed  this  region  and  revolu- 
tionized its  business  conditions.  She  is  interested  in  questions  of  general  im- 
portance and  in  everything  relating  to  the  welfare  and  growth  of  the  city  where 
her  excellent  qualities  of  character  have  gained  her  a  wide  and  representative 
circle  of  friends. 

Mr.  Peers  gave  his  political  allegiance  to  the  liberal  party  and  was  a  devout 
member  of  the  Methodist  church,  guiding  his  upright  and  honorable  life  by  the 
principles  in  which  he  believed.  He  was  a  strong  advocate  of  temperance  and  did 
a  great  deal  to  promote  this  cause  throughout  the  province.  Throughout  the 
period  of  his  residence  here  he  witnessed  practically  the  entire  growth  and  de- 
velopment of  New  Westminster  and  the  surrounding  country  and  his  public- 
spirited  work  in  the  general  interests  of  the  community  made  him  widely  and 
favorably  known.  His  death  therefore  removed  from  the  city  one  whom  it  could 
ill  afford  to  lose,  a  man  whose  strength  of  purpose  and  undaunted  energy  found 
expression  in  earnest  and  well  directed  work  in  the  promotion  of  civic  develop- 
ment and  in  the  support  of  projects  and  measures  for  advancement  and  growth. 


HENRY   A.    STONE. 

Henry  A.  Stone  as  managing  director  of  Gault  Brothers'  dry-goods  estab- 
lishment at  Vancouver  occupies  a  prominent  position  in  the  commercial  circles 
of  the  city  and  is  equally  widely  known  because  of  his  public  spirit  and  his 
active  and  helpful  connection  with  the  Board  of  Trade.  Indomitable  energy  and 
perseverance  carry  him  forward  to  success  in  whatever  line  he  engages,  and  his 
efforts  are  at  all  times  guided  by  sound  judgment,  productive  of  splendid  results. 
A  native  of  London,  England,  Mr.  Stone  was  born  in  1863,  his  parents  being 
William  and  Susan  M.  (Bluck)  Stone,  the  former  a  native  of  Scotland  and  the 
latter  of  England.  The  father  was  a  merchant  of  London  and  many  times  vis- 
ited Canada  but  never  became  a  permanent  resident  of  the  Dominion.  In 
Masonic  circles  in  England  he  was  very  prominent,  being  identified  with  the  order 
for  more  than  a  half  century.  Both  he  and  his  wife  have  now  passed  away. 
They  were  parents  of  six  children,  but  only  two  came  to  the  new  world,  Henry 
A.  and  Charles  E.,  the  latter  a  resident  of  Toronto. 

After  acquiring  his  education  in  a  private  college  of  London,  Henry  A.  Stone 
was  apprenticed  to  the  dry-goods  business  in  that  city,  and  in  1882  came  to 
Canada,  settling  in  Toronto,  where  he  was  in  the  employ  of  others  for  a  time, 
but  later  engaged  in  the  dry-goods  business  on  his  own  account.  He  remained 
an  active  factor  in  trade  circles  there  until  1902,  when  he  made  arrangements 
with  Gault  Brothers  to  come  to  Vancouver  as  managing  director  of  their  branch 
house  in  this  city.  The  firm  of  The  Gault  Brothers  Company,  Ltd.,  wholesale  dry- 
goods  merchants,  was  founded  in  Montreal  more  than  sixty  years  ago.  In  1898, 
when  the  population  of  Vancouver  was  twenty-three  thousand,  Andrew  F.  Gault, 
the  organizer  of  the  firm,  accompanied  by  James  Rodger,  visited  this  city  and,  rec- 
ognizing something  of  what  the  future  had  in  store  for  it,  decided  to  esablish  a 
branch  house  here,  which  was  done  the  following  year.  Since  that  time  it  has 
been  necessary  on  two  or  three  different  occasions  to  secure  enlarged  quarters, 
and  the  business  in  Vancouver  was  organized  as  a  separate  company  under  the 

name  of  Gault  Brothers,  Ltd.    Their  wholesale  dry-goods  establishment  occupies 
Vf  i.  in— 3 


68  BRITISH    COLUMBIA 

a  modern  seven-story  building  at  No.  361  Water  street,  containing  forty  thousand 
feet  of  floor  space.  The  employes  number  thirty-five,  including  seven  traveling 
salesmen,  and  the  business  extends  largely  over  British  Columbia  and  the  Yukon 
district.  As  managing  director  Mr.  Stone  bends  his  energies  to  administrative 
direction  and  executive  control  and  his  well  formulated  and  carefully  executed 
plans  are  productive  of  splendid  success. 

Since  coming  to  Vancouver,  Mr.  Stone  has  become  a  most  active  factor  in  the 
work  of  the  Board  of  Trade,  of  which  he  has  been  a  member  of  the  council 
for  ten  years,  while  in  1908  he  occupied  the  presidential  chair.  For  six  years 
he  was  chairman  of  the  land  settlement  committee  of  the  board  and  throughout 
the  entire  period  of  his  connection  with  the  board  he  has  persistently  placed 
before  the  merchants  and  citizens  of  the  city  the  necessity  of  land  settlement  in 
the  furtherance  of  trade  increase  and  provincial  development.  For  three  years 
he  was  chairman  of  the  freight  rates  committee  of  the  Board  of  Trade  and  gave 
liberally  of  his  time  and  energy  to  secure  the  revision  of  freight  rates  on  goods 
coming  into  this  province,  his  efforts  being  crowned  with  a  large  measure  of  suc- 
cess. He  has  carefully  studied  all  of  the  important  questions  coming  before  the 
board,  and  his  public  spirit,  combined  with  the  recognition  of  the  needs,  the  oppor- 
tunities and  the  resources  of  the  city,  has  enabled  him  to  so  direct  public  thought 
and  action  through  the  board  as  to  secure  the  adoption  of  various  plans  and 
projects  that  have  been  of  material  benefit  to  the  city.  Mr.  Stone  was  also  a 
director  of  the  First  International  Apple  Show,  held  in  Vancouver,  which  did  as 
much  and  probably  more  in  the  way  of  advertising  the  resources  of  British  Colum- 
bia than  any  exhibit  ever  shown  in  the  province. 

In  1888,  in  Old  Barnes  church,  in  Putney,  England,  Mr.  Stone  was  united  in 
marriage  to  Miss  Beatrice  H.  Philps,  a  native  of  that  country.  The  three 
children  of  this  marriage  are:  Frances  M.,  the  wife  of  W.  R.  Mathews,  of 
Philadelphia,  Pennsylvania;  Horace  G.,  now  attending  McGill  University  at 
Montreal;  and  Elsie  V.,  at  home.  Mr.  Stone  is  a  conservative,  but  never  active 
in  party  ranks.  He  served  in  the  Queen's  Own  Rifles  of  Toronto  and  held  a 
sergeant's  certificate.  He  is  a  member  of  the  Church  of  England  and  belongs 
to  the  Terminal  City,  Progress  and  Canadian  Clubs,  enjoying  their  social  features 
and  taking  an  active  and  helpful  part  in  their  efforts  to  advance  the  interests  and 
promote  the  welfare  of  the  city.  He  is  a  public-spirited  man  and  one  whose 
efforts  have  been  of  far-reaching  influence. 


LIEUTENANT  COLONEL  THE  HON.  E.  G.  PRIOR. 

The  life  history  of  Colonel  E.  G.  Prior  is  inseparably  interwoven  with  the 
history  of  Victoria,  British  Columbia,  and  of  Canada.  He  has  been  a  cabinet 
officer,  a  member  of  parliament,  member  of  the  provincial  parliament  and  premier 
of  British  Columbia,  and,  moreover,  is  one  of  the  foremost  business  men  of 
Vancouver  island.  His  position  socially,  politically  and  commercially  is  a  most 
prominent  one.  He  has  been  identified  with  all  the  progressive  movements  that 
have  tended  to  better  social  and  civic  conditions  in  the  community  for  an  extended 
period,  and  at  all  times,  while  working  toward  high  ideals,  he  has  employed 
practical  methods  that  have  proved  effective  in  attaining  the  result  desired. 

He  was  born  May  21,  1853,  at  Dallaghgill,  near  Ripon,  in  Yorkshire,  England, 
the  second  son  of  the  Rev.  Henry  Prior,  vicar  of  that  place,  and  Hannah  Prior. 
Both  parents  are  now  deceased.  The  son  was  educated  at  Leeds  grammar  school 
and  afterward  served  his  articles  as  mining  engineer  in  Wakefield.  In  November, 
1873,  he  engaged  with  the  Vancouver  Coal  Mining  &  Land  Company,  Ltd.,  and 
came  to  Vancouver  island  as  engineer  for  that  company,  with  which  he  remained 
until  1878.  When  the  Mine  Inspection  Act  was  passed  the  miners  of  the  country 
petitioned  the  government  to  make  Mr.  Prior  government  inspector  of  mines, 
which  request  was  accordingly  complied  with. 


HON.  E.  G.  PRIOR 


BRITISH    COLUMBIA  71 

In  1880,  however,  having  found  that  a  government  position  offered  little 
opportunity  for  advancement,  Mr.  Prior  purchased  half  the  business  of  Alfred 
Fellows,  a  hardware  merchant,  who  had  opened  a  store  in  1859.  The  firm 
then  became  Fellows  &  Prior  and  continued  as  such  until  1883,  when  Mr.  Prior 
purchased  his  partner's  interest.  When  he  entered  the  business  in  1880  there 
was  only  one  employe  and  the  store  was  located  on  Yates  street.  When  Mr. 
Prior  took  over  the  entire  business  he  began  making  plans  for  its  expansion, 
resolving  that  he  would  increase  the  sales  if  it  could  be  done  by  honorable, 
progressive  methods.  The  result  of  the  enterprising  spirit  and  contagious  enthu- 
siasm which  he  introduced  as  a  factor  in  the  business  had  immediate  results 
and  his  growing  trade  led  to  his  admitting  G.  F.  Mathews  to  a  partnership  in 
the  business  in  1886.  In  1891  they  were  joined  by  G.  W.  Wynne,  who  had 
commenced  with  Mr.  Fellows,  and  in  1905  by  C.  P.  W.  Schwengers.  These  four 
gentlemen  own  the  entire  stock  of  E.  G.  Prior  &  Company,  Ltd.,  under  which 
name  the  business  was  incorporated  in  1891.  The  head  offices  and  warehouses 
are  situated  in  Victoria,  with  branch  houses  in  Vancouver  and  Kamloops.  The  reg- 
ular staff  today  consists  of  over  ninety-five  people  and  ninety-four  thousand  square 
feet  of  floor  space  is  utilized.  The  firm  has  offices  in  both  London,  England, 
and  New  York,  and  their  business  covers  the  whole  of  British  Columbia.  They 
have  an  extensive  trade  in  iron  and  hardware  as  well  as  in  machinery,  and  are 
the  sole  agents  in  this  province  for  many  of  the  largest  firms  in  the  world. 
They  issue  a  hardware  catalogue  of  over  eight  hundred  pages  and  a  smaller 
machinery  catalogue.  Their  regular  customers  include  nearly  all  of  the  owners 
of  the  largest  mills,  mines  and  railways  and  the  foremost  contractors  and  farmers 
in  the  province.  Theirs  has  been  a  steadily  growing  business  that  owes  its 
success  in  major  part  to  the  man  whose  name  it  bears. 

Mr.  Prior  is  essentially  a  typical,  energetic  business  man  of  the  present 
age — methodical,  systematic,  aggressive,  affable  and  always  approachable.  .The 
same  qualities,  too,  indicate  his  fitness  for  activity  in  politics,  and  his  fellow 
townsmen,  desiring  his  services  in  that  connection,  elected  him  a  member  of  the 
British  Columbia  legislature,  in  which  he  served  from  1886  until  1888,  when 
he  resigned  to  become  a  candidate  for  the  house  of  commons,  to  which  he  was 
returned  by  acclamation.  He  was  reelected  in  1891,  1896  and  1900,  a  fact  indica- 
tive of  his  fidelity  and  capability  in  office.  He  has  ever  subordinated  self- 
aggrandizement  to  the  public  good,  and  he  stands  loyally  in  support  of  every 
principle  in  which  he  believes.  During  the  Sir  Mackenzie-Bowell's  ministry  in 
1895  Mr.  Prior  was  controller  of  inland  revenue,  with  a  seat  in  the  cabinet,  and 
was  also  with  Sir  Charles  Tupper's  ministry  until  its  resignation  in  1896.  In 
November,  1902,  he  was  made  premier  of  British  Columbia  and  so  continued 
until  June,  1903. 

Mr.  Prior  was  elected  a  life  member  of  the  North  of  England  Institute  of 
Mining  and  Mechanical  Engineers  in  1875.  He  *s  also  vice  president  of  the 
Victoria  Board  of  Trade.  His  military  serivce  has  also  brought  him  prominently 
into  public  notice.  For  several  years  he  was  lieutenant  colonel  of  the  Fifth 
Regiment  Garrison  Artillery  of  British  Columbia,  continuing  in  that  position 
from  1888  until  1896.  He  holds  a  certificate  of  qualification  from  the  Royal 
School  of  Artillery,  and  he  was  twice  president  of  the  Dominion  Artillery  Asso- 
ciation. He  was  appointed  extra  aid-de-camp  of  two  of  the  governor  generals  of 
Canada,  Lord  Stanley  and  Lord  Aberdeen,  being  first  called  to  the  position  in 
1889,  and  he  commanded  the  Canadian  Rifle  Team  at  Bisley,  England,  in  1890. 

In  1878  Mr.  Prior  married  Suzette  Work,  of  Victoria,  and  by  this  marriage 
a  son  and  three  daughters  were  born :  Helen  Kendell  Mouncey,  the  eldest,  is  now 
the  wife  of  Captain,  the  Hon.  F.  G.  Hood,  R.  E.,  stationed  in  Ireland;  Cecelia 
Maud  is  the  wife  of  Judge  Lampman,  of  Victoria ;  Basil  Gawler  is  engaged  in 
the  real-estate  business  in  Victoria ;  Jessie  Burton  is  at  home.  The  mother  passed 
away  in  1897  and  in  1899  Mr.  Prior  was  again  married,  his  second  union  being 
with  Genevieve  B.  Wright,  a  daughter  of  Captain  Thomas  Wright,  of  San 


72  BRITISH    COLUMBIA 

Francisco.     In  addition  to  his  city  residence  in  Victoria  Colonel  Prior  has  a 
beautiful  country  home  on  the  shores  of  Shawnigan  lake  on  Vancouver  island. 

Colonel  Prior  is  a  member  of  the  Union  Club  of  Victoria,  of  which  he  is 
now  the  president.  He  also  belongs  to  the  Vancouver  Club  of  Vancouver,  British 
Columbia,  and  the  United  Empire  Club  of  London,  England.  Politically  he  is 
a  conservative.  He  is  fond  of  motoring  and  fishing  and  much  of  his  recreation 
comes  to  him  along  those  lines.  His  ability  to  meet  all  men  affably  and  tact- 
fully, his  thorough  business  methods  and  his  faculty  for  careful  organization, 
together  with  other  cardinal  virtues  of  the  successful  business  man — industry, 
honesty,  system  and  one  price  for  all — are  the  secrets  of  his  commercial  pros- 
perity. Always  pleasant  and  courteous,  calm  and  serene  at  all  times  and  under 
any  circumstances,  he  wins  friends  wherever  he  goes.  Under  a  quiet  exterior, 
however,  there  is  an  underlying  force  of  will  and  reserve.  He  is  a  man  who 
has  fought  battles  in  the  political  and  business  arena  for  the  mere  love  of  winning 
the  victory,  and  the  greater  the  difficulties  the  more  determined  and  persistent 
his  purpose.  He  commands  and  holds  the  respect  and  loyalty  of  his  associates 
and  his  employes.  He  has  with  him  men  who  have  been  in  his  service  for  the 
past  twenty  or  thirty  years,  and  no  higher  testimonial  of  his  character  could 
be  given  than  this. 


HENRY  VALENTINE  EDMONDS. 

The  prestige  of  the  Edmonds  name  has  been  so  long  established  in  the  prov- 
ince of  British  Columbia,  and  especially  in  the  city  of  New  Westminster,  that 
no  introduction  is  necessary  to  recall  one  of  the  foremost  personalities  that 
shap.ed  the  early  history  and  development  of  the  institutions  and  business  affairs 
of  this  city.  The  late  Henry  Valentine  Edmonds,  whose  place  and  influence  in 
the  history  of  British  Columbia  deserve  especial  prominence,  was  born  in  Dublin, 
Ireland,  February  14,  1837,  and  died  in  Vancouver,  this  province,  on  the  I4th 
day  of  June,  1897.  He  was  the  second  son  of  William  and  Matilda  E.  (Hum- 
phries) Edmonds,  both  natives  of  Dublin.  On  the  paternal  side  the  descent  is 
traced  from  an  old  English  family  that  settled  in  Ireland  during  the  early  days, 
and  on  the  maternal  side  the  ancestry  in  French  Huguenot,  the  forbears  escap- 
ing from  France  at  the  time  of  the  St.  Bartholomew  massacre  and  the  subse- 
quent persecution  of  the  Huguenots. 

Until  his  twelfth  year  the  late  Mr.  Edmonds  was  educated  in  the  schools  of 
his  native  city,  Dublin,  and  then  the  family  removed  to  Liverpool,  England, 
where  he  attended  the  High  School  Mechanics  Institute.  He  later  went  abroad 
on  the  continent  and  was  a  student  in  the  famous  Moravian  Institute  at  Neuwied 
on  the  Rhine,  finishing  his  education  in  Dresden,  Saxony.  His  early  business 
career  was  spent  in  Liverpool,  and  later  in  London.  While  in  the  latter  city  he 
joined  the  First  Surrey  Volunteers,  the  first  of  the  new  corps  established  in  that 
city,  but  upon  the  formation  of  the  London  Irish  Volunteers  he  joined  his  national 
corps.  Passing  rapidly  through  the  non-commissioned  ranks,  he  was  selected  by 
the  Marquis  of  Donegal,  the  colonel  commanding,  as  ensign  of  a  new  company, 
especially  formed  for  the  marquis'  son-in-law,  Lord  Ashley.  On  receiving 
this  appointment,  July  5,  1860,  Mr.  Edmonds  was  attached  to  the  Third  Batta- 
lion Grenadier  Guards  for  drill  instruction,  and  passed  with  a  first-class  certifi- 
cate. On  April  13,  1861,  he  was  promoted  to  a  lieutenancy,  and  held  this  rank 
until  he  resigned  in  April,  1862,  in  order  to  come  to  British  Columbia.  At  that 
time  he  stood  second  on  the  list  for  succession  to  the  captaincy.  Lieutenant  Ed- 
monds took  part  in  the  celebrated  revie\vs  held  in  1860  in  Hyde  Park,  in  i86[ 
at  Wimbleton,  and  in  1862  at  Brighton,  under  the  late  Lord  Clyde.  One  day, 
after  he  had  taken  part  in  a  parade,  he  was  with  part  of  his  company  when  the 
London  Bridge  fire  occurred,  and  he  and  his  men  rendered  material  service  in 
keeping  the  grounds  clear  so  that  the  firemen  could  work  freely. 


HENRY  VALENTINE  EDMONDS 


BRITISH    COLUMBIA  75 

9 

In  May,  1862,  Mr.  Edmonds  sailed  from  England,  and  on  the  following  4th 
of  July  arrived  in  San  Francisco.  He  was  there  during  the  great  rejoicing 
occasioned  by  the  passage  through  congress  of  the  Pacific  Railway  bill.  In  the 
same  year  he  came  on  to  Victoria  and  thence  to  New  Westminster,  where  his 
career  of  usefulness  was  to  henceforth  be  so  conspicuously  wrought  out.  For 
twenty-five  years  he  was  one  of  the  foremost  real-estate  and  insurance  men  of 
New  Westminster,  doing  business  with  nearly  all  of  the  property  holders  of  the 
city.  At  the  same  time  he  gave  his  efforts  gratuitously  to  the  advancement  of  all 
the  best  interests  of  the  city.  He  was  active  in  the  organization  of  the  Royal 
Columbian  Hospital  and  the  Mechanics  Institute,  and  his  services  as  secretary, 
treasurer  or  president  were  always  in  demand.  On  the  formation  of  the  Board 
of  Trade  in  New  Westminster  he  served  as  its  secretary  for  the  first  year,  and 
had  much  to  do  with  carrying  out  the  details  of  the  board's  organization,  later 
being  its  vice  president  and  for  many  years  continuing  as  a  factor  in  its  work. 
He  gave  freely  of  both  means  and  time  for  the  proper  celebration  of  such  annual 
events  as  the  Queen's  anniversary,  and  also  for  the  reception  of  distinguished 
visitors  that  came  to  the  city.  He  worked  hard  in  committee  and  in  private  to 
make  these  occasions  a  credit  to  the  city.  He  is  honored  as  the  originator  of  the 
May  Day  festival  throughout  the  province  and  the  first  celebration  of  that  day 
was  held  in  his  city. 

He  helped  to  organize  the  Howe  Sound  Silver  Mining  Companv  and  the 
Fraser  River  Beet  Sugar  Company.  In  1873  he  and  other  public-spirited  citi- 
zens organized  the  Fraser  Valley  Railway  Company,  of  which  he  was  made 
secretary.  Later  this  became  the  New  Westminster  Southern  Railway  Com- 
pany, in  which  he  continued  his  interests.  In  December,  1867,  he  was  appointed 
clerk  of  the  municipal  council  and  during  the  seven  years  of  his  incumbency 
of  that  office  all  the  city's  business  was  performed  without  any  legal  costs  to  the 
community.  He  himself  drew  up  all  the  by-laws  and  did  all  the  work  necessi- 
tated by  the  incorporation  of  the  city. 

In  December,  1872,  .Mr.  Edmonds  was  selected  as  the  agent  of  the  govern- 
ment under  the  Walkem  government.  In  addition  to  the  exaction  of  his  private 
affairs,  he  performed  all  the  duties  of  this  office  for  the  district  of  New  West- 
minster until  January,  1876,  when,  on  the  advent  into  power  of  the  Elliott  minis- 
try, it  was  decided  to  apportion  the  duties  of  agent  to  several  officers.  Mr. 
Edmonds,  thenceforth,  until  July,  1880,  retained  the  office  of  sheriff  and  gave  a 
most  creditable  performance  of  its  work.  He  enjoyed  the  confidence  of  the 
entire  legal  profession  and  no  suits  were  ever  brought  against  him  nor  did  he 
bring  any,  except  such  as  were  entirely  justified  and  eventuated  in  his  favor. 

In  18*70,  on  the  organization  of  the  New  Westminster  Rifle  Volunteers  under 
the  late  Captain  Bushby,  Mr.  Edmonds  was  appointed  adjutant,  which  position 
he  held  until  1874  when,  on  the  formation  of  the  No.  i  Rifle  Company,  he  was 
gazetted  as  captain,  the  following  memorandum  being  a  part  of  his  record: 
"Formerly  lieutenant  London  Irish  Volunteers,  holding  A-i  certificate  for  effi- 
ciency, and  remained  in  command  until  May,  1875,  when  he  retired  retaining 
rank  of  lieutenant." 

Mr.  Edmonds  served  his  city  both  in  council  and  as  its  honorable  mayor  and 
also  stood  for  the  provincial  legislature,  as  an  independent  candidate,  but  was 
defeated.  In  1883  he  received  the  appointment  of  justice  of  the  peace  for  New 
Westminster  city  and  district.  Throughout  his  career  in  this  city  his  confidence 
in  the  future  and  the  boundless  resources  and  possibilities  of  New  Westminster, 
city  and  district,  and  the  entire  Fraser  River  valley,  was  unshaken,  and  he  gave 
evidence  of  this  confidence  by  his  extensive  investments  in  both  the  city  and  dis- 
trict and  especially  at  Port  Moody  and  what  has  since  developed  into  the  phe- 
nomenal city  of  Vancouver.  He  had  large  sawmill  interests  and  timber  tracts 
and  mines  in  the  province.  He  was  a  large  shareholder  in  the  New  Westminster 
Street  Railway,  and  the  Vancouver  Electric  Railway  &  Light  Company.  His 
benefactions  were  large,  and  of  material  value.  He  gave  Vancouver  the  site  for 
its  most  pleasantly  situated  public  school  and  the  beautiful  site  for  the  Episcopal 


76  BRITISH    COLUMBIA 

% 

church  and  parsonage,  and  to  New  Westminster  he  donated  a  public-school  site. 
His  activity  and  philanthropy  were  always  manifest  in  the  work  of  the  Epis- 
copal diocese  of  New  Westminster  and  the  "Churchman's  Gazette"  records  his 
repeated  benevolences. 

In  November,  1867,  Mr.  Edmonds  was  very  happily  married  to  Miss  Jane 
Fortune  Kemp.  She  was  born  in  Cork,  Ireland,  the  eldest  daughter  of  Thomas 
P.  Kemp,  of  that  city.  They  became  the  parents  of  the  following  children :  Wil- 
liam Humphries ;  Henry  Lovekin ;  Beatrice  Elvina,  who  married  W.  A.  Monro ; 
Walter  Freth;  and  Mary  Gifford,  who  married  C.  M.  Marpole,  of  Vancouver. 


ROBERT  STEVENSON. 

The  life  history  of  Robert  Stevenson  if  written  in  detail  would  present  some 
interesting  features  of  mining  experience  in  the  northwest.  As  a  mine  owner  he 
is  well  known,  having  made  extensive  investments  in  mining  property.  His  home 
is  now  at  Sardis,  British  Columbia,  and  Williamstown,  Glengarry,  numbers  him 
among  its  native  citizens,  his  birth  having  there  occurred  on  the  28th  of  July, 
1838.  He  is  a  son  of  Samuel  and  Susan  Stevenson,  both  of  whom  are  deceased. 
They  were  farming  people  and  under  the  parental  roof  their  son  Robert  spent 
his  boyhood  days,  his  education  being  acquired  at  the  convent  and  grammar  schools 
of  Vankleek  Hill,  in  Prescott  county,  Ontario.  When  his  younger  days  were  over 
he  came,  in  early  manhood,  to  British  Columbia,  arriving  here  in  the  month  of 
May,  1859,  during  the  time  of  the  gold  excitement  in  the  northwest.  He  found, 
however,  that  reports  had  been  much  exaggerated  and  feeling  that  he  could  not 
obtain  a  fortune  in  the  mines  he  proceeded  to  what  was  in  those  days  called  Wash- 
ington territory,  now  the  state  of  Washington,  in  which  he  remained  until  he  joined 
the  celebrated  Collins  expedition  bound  for  the  Similkameen  country  and  led  by 
Captain  Collins,  a  noted  Indian  fighter.  The  western  country  in  those  days  was 
one  vast,  trackless  forest,  hence  the  difficulties  to  be  encountered  can  in  a  measure 
be  understood.  The  party  had  to  make  trails  through  unknown  woods,  had  to 
cross  rivers  and  climb  mountains.  This  was  the  first  white  party  to  pass  from  the 
salt  water  to  the  interior,  going  in  by  way  of  the  famous  Snocolomie  Pass.  They 
crossed  the  pass  on  the  2d  of  June,  at  which  time  there  was  ten  feet  of  snow,  our 
subject  trying  to  touch  bottom  with  a  ten-foot  pole,  but  failing.  That  the  party 
of  thirty-four  might  proceed  it  was  necessary  to  dig  a  ditch  two  and  a  half  feet 
wide  and  two  and  a  half  feet  deep  and  fill  it  in  with  brush  to  form  a  footing.  The 
party  proceeded  down  the  Yakima  river  and  crossed  where  the  town  of  Parker  is 
now  located.  During  all  the  journey  they  were  harrassed  by  unfriendly  Indians 
who  objected  to  the  white  men's  intrusion  into  their  possessions  or  hunting 
grounds.  As  Mr.  Stevenson  recalled  this  trip  and  in  retrospect  saw  the  country 
of  those  days  he  marvelled  at  the  progress  made.  At  that  time  between  the  Cas- 
cades and  the  present  town  of  Midway,  a  distance  of  two  hundred  and  fifty  miles, 
there  was  not  a  white  settler.  The  party  reached  Fort  Okanagan,  the  fort  of  the 
Hudson's  Bay  Company,  on  the  i6th  of  June,  1860.  Two  days  later  this  fort  was 
abandoned  and  Mr.  Stevenson  is  today  the  only  living  man  who  was  present  at 
its  abandonment.  The  Indians  were  on  the  warpath  and  had  Mr.  Stevenson  and 
his  party  rounded  up  for  five  hours,  but  they  fought  their  way  out  without  losing 
a  man.  They  reached  Rock  Creek  mines  on  the  22d  of  June,  1860,  and  there 
Captain  Collins  made  a  speech  and  left  the  party. 

Mr.  Stevenson  engaged  in  prospecting  for  some  time  and  then  occurred  the 
Rock  Creek  war,  the  miners  refusing  to  comply  with  the  law  by  taking  out  a  license 
or  recording  claims.  Governor  Douglas  went  to  the  locality  to  settle  the  trouble 
and  in  recognition  of  the  part  which  Mr.  Stevenson  had  taken  all  through  the 
difficulty  Governor  Douglas  appointed  him  customs  officer  at  a  salary  of  two  hun- 
dred and  fifty  dollars  a  month.  Then  came  the  great  Cariboo  gold  excitement. 
Mr.  Stevenson  sent  in  his  resignation  as  customs  officer  and  started  at  once  for  the 


ROBERT   STEVENSON 


BRITISH    COLUMBIA  79 

Cariboo.  He  had  received  information  that  horses  were  in  great  demand  there,  so 
he  bought  a  large  number,  drove  them  into  the  country  and  disposed  of  them  at  a 
handsome  profit.  He  was  one  of  ten  men  who  took  any  money  into  the  Cariboo.  He 
bought  into  the  Jordan  claim  in  the  fall  of  1861  and  on  the  3d  of  November  of 
that  year  left  for  Victoria,  traveling  with  the  party  of  the  later  Governor  Dewd- 
ney,  now  a  resident  of  Victoria,  reaching  Yale  on  the  5th  of  December,  and  Vic- 
toria on  the  1 5th  of  that  month.  While  in  Victoria  Mr.  Stevenson  met  the  famous 
"Cariboo  Cameron,"  who  had  just  landed  in  Victoria  with  his  family.  This  was 
on  the  2d  of  March,  1862.  Mr.  Stevenson  intrpduced  Cameron  to  Mr.  Wark,  the 
chief  factor  of  the  Hudson's  Bay  Company,  and  was  instrumental  in  his  getting 
credit  for  goods  to  the  amount  of  two  thousand  dollars.  Mr.  Stevenson  went  back 
to  the  Cariboo  on  the  23d  of  April,  1862,  Cameron  following  in  July.  The  former 
had  heard  of  unclaimed  ground  and  was  forced  almost  to  drive  Cameron  to  assist 
in  staking  this.  However,  on  the  22d  of  August,  1862,  the  Cameron  mine,  one  of 
the  richest  mines  of  the  Cariboo,  was  staked  by  Mr.  Cameron  and  Mr.  Stevenson. 
Mr.  Cameron  wished  to  name  it  for  Mr.  Stevenson  but  the  latter  had  his  way 
and  it  was  called  the  Cameron  claim.  On  the  2d  of  December,  1862,  there  were 
seven  shareholders  in  the  mine:  John  A.  and  Sophia  Cameron,  Robert  Steven- 
son, Richard  Rivers,  Allan  McDonald  and  Charles  and  James  Clendening,  all  now 
deceased  except  Mr.  Stevenson.  Mrs.  Cameron  died  on  the  23d  of  October  and  her 
body  was  placed  in  a  cabin  outside  of  Richfield  to  await  a  chance  to  take  her  home 
for  burial.  On  January  3ist,  at  a  temperature  of  fifty  degrees  below  zero,  Mr. 
Cameron  had  the  body  removed  to  Victoria,  where  a  provisional  burial  was  made 
until  later  in  the  year  when  the  remains  were  taken  to  Cornwall,  New  Brunswick, 
Mr.  Cameron  almost  spending  a  fortune  in  accomplishing  his  end.  He  was 
notably  successful  as  a  miner  for  a  considerable  period  but  eventually  lost  all 
he  had,  and  drifted  back  to  Cariboo,  where  he  died  poor  and  was  buried  in  the 
old  mining  camp.  It  was  on  the  2d  of  December,  1862,  that  the  rich  gold  strike 
was  made  on  the  Cameron  claim,  Mr.  Stevenson  rocking  out  one  hundred  and 
fifty-five  dollars  from  thirty-five  gallons  of  gravel.  It  was  after  this  that  Mr. 
Cameron  took  his  wife's  remains  to  Victoria,  Mr.  Stevenson  accompanying  him, 
and  the  burial  there  took  place  on  the  8th  of  March.  Mr.  Cameron  offered  twelve 
dollars  a  day  in  addition  to  a  sum  of  two  thousand  dollars  to  any  of  the  men  who 
would  accompany  him  but  all  were  afraid  of  smallpox.  Mr.  Stevenson,  however, 
went  and  paid  his  own  expenses.  When  they  were  on  their  way  out  of  the  country 
the -cold  was  intense  and  everywhere  along  the  road  they  found  many  dying  of 
smallpox.  While  en  route  they  lost  their  food  supplies  and  their  matches  and 
suffered  untold  hardships  but  at  length  reached  Victoria  on  the  7th  of  March. 
On  November  7th,  the  body  of  Mrs.  Cameron  was  started  for  the  east  via  Panama 
for  final  burial. 

After  the  funeral  services  at  Cornwall  Mr.  Stevenson  returned  to  the  Cariboo 
in  1864  and  took  active  part  in  mining  affairs.  During  the  stirring  days  from 
1861  until  1864  and  even  up  to  1877  he  held  interests  in  various  famous  claims 
including  the  Cameron,  Prince  of  Wales,  Moffat,  the  Bruce  and  many  others, 
and  is  so  thoroughly  familiar  with  the  history  of  mining  development  in  that  sec- 
tion of  the  country  that  Sir  Mathew  Bigbee  said  of  him  that  he  was  the  best  posted 
man  in  the  Cariboo  country. 

Mr.  Stevenson  went  to  Chilliwack  and  there  married  Miss  Caroline  E.  Wil- 
liams on  the  26th  of  July,  1877,  since  which  time  he  has  been  engaged  in  farming 
and  mining.  He  is  the  largest  individual  mine  owner  in  the  Similkameen  country 
and  has  large  holdings  at  Leadville,  two  groups  of  claims  at  the  Great  Nickel 
Plate  and  is  an  extensive  owner  at  Copper  Mountain,  his  claims  amounting  alto- 
gether to  more  than  forty. 

Unto  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Stevenson  have  been  born  four  children :  Clarinda  Eliza- 
beth, a  teacher  of  Chilliwack ;  John  Edison,  living  on  a  farm  at  Chilliwack ;  Roberta 
E.  L.,  the  wife  of  James  Watson,  B.  A.,  principal  of  a  school  at  North  Vancouver; 
and  Robert  Bryant. 


80  BRITISH    COLUMBIA 

Mr.  Stevenson  is  among  the  very  few  now  living  who  are  entitled  to  be  num- 
bered among  the  real  pioneers  of  British  Columbia,  for  he  has  endured  innumerable 
hardships  and  gathered  wide  experience  when  the  resources  of  the  province  came 
to  the  attention  of  the  world.  There  is  nothing  which  characterizes  him  better 
than  the  way  the  Indians  called  him,  the  "Man  Afraid  of  Nothing."  He  climbed 
the  most  rugged  crags  and  would  enter  the  wildest  canyons.  He  swam  horses 
across  the  Similkumeen  river  hundreds  of  times  and  also  across  the  Thompson  and 
the  Okanagan  when  there  were  dangers  on  every  hand.  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Stevenson 
now  occupy  a  beautiful  home  on  a  farm  of  two  hundred  and  fifty  acres  at  Sardis, 
the  large  and  commodious  house  being  one  of  the  landmarks  of  the  region  and 
the  property-  a  show  place  famed  as  a  model  establishment  of  its  kind.  The  history 
of  both  of  them  links  the  present  with  the  pioneer  days,  and  though  both  are 
advanced  in  age,  they  are  still  strong  and  robust,  clear  of  brain  and  active  bodily 
and  mentally.  Both  are  great  workers  in  the  Methodist  Episcopal  church.  When 
a  young  man  out  among  the  hills,  alone  with  his  God  and  nature,  Mr.  Stevenson 
made  a  study  of  religious  matters  and  has  ever  adhered  to  those  deep-rooted  con- 
clusions which  resulted  from  his  meditations.  He  has  never  dissipated,  never 
used  tobacco,  and  to  these  things  and  his  life  in  the  open  air  may  be  attributed 
his  present  splendid  state  of  health.  A  man  five  feet  seven  or  eight  inches  tall, 
he  weighs  over  two  hundred  pounds  and  at  the  age  of  seventy-five  has  an  energy 
and  business  acumen  which  many  a  successful  man  of  half  his  age  might  well 
envy.  In  his  political  views  he  is  a  conservative.  He  belongs  to  Princess  Lodge 
of  Masons  at  Montreal  and  is  a  charter  member  of  the  Royal  Order  of  Orangemen 
of  Princeton.  He  also  belongs  to  the  Vancouver  Mining  Club.  He  is  one  of  the 
few  men  remaining  of  the  early  days,  a  picturesque  character  because  of  his  many 
and  varied  experiences  in  connection  with  the  mining  development  of  the  north- 
west. He  can  relate  most  interesting  incidents  of  the  early  days,  of  the  life  lived 
by  the  miners,  and  he  is  one  of  those  who  have  prospered  by  labor  and  judicious 
investments,  his  mining  and  other  properties  being  extensive  and  valuable. 


GEORGE  STEVENSON  HARRISON. 

While  George  Stevenson  Harrison  has  been  a  resident  of  Vancouver  only  since 
1905  he  has  within  that  period  won  recognition  as  a  strong  and  forceful  element 
in  that  business  activity  upon  which  is  based  the  present  progress  and  prosperity 
of  the  city.  He  is  today  manager  of  the'  Vancouver  branch  of  the  Merchants 
Bank,  the  first  branch  of  that  institution  to  be  established  in  British  Columbia. 
He  was  born  at  St.  Mary's  Ontario,  June  25,  1875,  and  is  a  son  of  the  Hon.  David 
Howard  and  Kate  (Stevenson)  Harrison.  The  father,  who  was  of  English 
descent,  was  born  in  London  township,  Ontario,  June  I,  1843.  He  pursued  his 
education  in  the  University  of  Toronto  and  in  McGill  University  at  -Montreal, 
receiving  from  the  latter  institution  the  degree  of  M.  D.  Having  thus  qualified 
for  the  practice  of  medicine  he  followed  his  profession  for  some  years  at  St. 
Mary's  Ontario.  He  then  removed  to  Winnipeg,  Manitoba.  He  also  became  a 
recognized  leader  in  politics  and  was  first  returned  to  the  provincial  legislature  at 
the  general  election  in  1883.  In  August,  1886,  he  was  invited  by  Mr.  Norquay, 
then  premier  of  Manitoba,  to  join  his  administration,  was  sworn  in  as  a  member 
of  the  executive  council  and  appointed  minister  of  agriculture,  statistics  and  health. 
He  occupied  that  position  with  the  government  until  December,  1887,  when  on  the 
resignation  of  Mr.  Norquay  he  was  appointed  premier  by  Governor  Aikins  and 
continued  in  that  administrative  position  until  January,  1888,  when  he  resigned 
the  premiership  on  the  defeat  at  the  polls  of  Joseph  Burke,  a  member  of  his  ad- 
ministration. He  has  done  much  to  shape  the  public  thought  and  action,  and  in 
guiding  the  destinies  of  the  province  wrought  many  noted  reforms  and  improve- 
ments. 


GEORGE   S.   HARRISON 


BRITISH    COLUMBIA  83 

Liberal  educational  opportunities  were  accorded  George  Stevenson  Harrison, 
who  after  pursuing  a  course  of  study  in  the  Manitoba  College  entered  the  employ 
of  the  Merchants  Bank  of  Canada  at  Winnipeg  in  1893.  He  has  since  been  con- 
tinuously connected  with  that  bank  and  his  twenty  years'  service  as  one  of  its 
representatives  indicates  his  efficiency,  his  loyalty  and  his  reliability.  In  1905 
he  came  to  Vancouver  where  he  entered  upon  arrangements  toward  the  establish- 
ment of  a  branch  for  the  Merchants  Bank  which  was  here  opened  in  February, 
1906.  He  became  its  manager  and  has  since  controlled  the  interests  of  the  insti- 
tution which  is  one  of  the  strong  financial  concerns  of  Vancouver.  He  also  has 
individual  connections,  being  a  director  of  the  Vancouver  Financial  Corporation, 
Limited. 

In  1906  Mr.  Harrison  was  married  to  Miss  Mary  Ellen  Davis,  of  Sarnia, 
Ontario,  a  daughter  of  Canon  Davis,  of  the  Anglican  church.  Their  two  children 
are  Katherine  Elizabeth  and  David  George.  Mr.  Harrison  is  a  member  of  tne 
Vancouver  and  Jericho  Country  Clubs  and  is  prominent  and  popular  in  the  social 
as  well  as  the  business  circles  of  the  city.  His  record  is  one  which  any  man 
might  be  proud  to  possess  for  in  his  entire  business  career  he  has  never  made  en- 
gagements that  he  has  not  kept  nor  incurred  obligations  that  he  has  not  met.  He 
enjoys  in  full  measure  the  confidence  and  high  regard  of  colleagues  and  contem- 
poraries. 


JAMES  EARL-McILREEVY. 

James  Earl  Mcllreevy,  acting  in  an  able  and  efficient  manner  as  manager  of 
the  Vancouver  branch  of  the  important  business  operated  by  the  Crane  Company, 
was  born  in  Belleville,  Ontario,  November  7,  1869,  and  is  a  son  of  John  and 
Anna  B.  (Brennen)  Mcllreevy,  the  former  a  native  of  London,  England,  who 
went  to  the  United  States  with  his  parents  when  he  was  still  a  child.  His  father. 
William*  Mcllreevy,  was  a  soldier  in  the  English  army.  He  afterward  engaged 
in  the  manufacturing  and  retail  shoe  business  in  Port  Huron,  Michigan,  for  a 
number  of  years  and  later  went  to  New  York  state,  where  he  engaged  in  the 
same  occupation  in  various  localities,  and  about  1875  went  to  Nebraska  City, 
where  he  spent  the  remainder  of  his  life,  dying  there  in  1901,  at  the  age  of 
sixty-seven.  His  wife  survives  him  and  makes  her  home  in  Nebraska  City. 

James  E.  Mcllreevy  acquired  his  education  in  the  public  schools  of  Nebraska 
City,  graduating  from  the  high  school  in  1886,  and  he  afterward  supplemented 
this  by  a  two  years'  business  course.  When  he  began  his  independent  career  he 
accepted  a  position  on  the  construction  of  municipal  waterworks  and  electric 
light  plants  in  Nebraska  City  and  smaller  surrounding  towns,  spending  three 
years  at  this  work,  after  which,  in  1890,  he  was  made  manager  of  the  water- 
works and  electric  light  plant  in  Nebraska  City.  This  office  he  held  until  1899, 
when  he  resigned  in  order  to  engage  as  an  expert  trap  shooter,  representing  and 
introducing  the  clay  targets  and  traps  manufactured  by  the  W.  S.  Dickey  Clay 
Manufacturing  Company  of  Kansas  City,  Missouri.  He  became  the  champion 
shooter  on  clay  targets  in  the  state  of  Nebraska,  and  in  the  interests  of  his 
concern  traveled  to  the  Pacific  Coast,  visiting  Portland  and  Seattle.  When  he 
gave  up  this  line  of  work  in  1900  he  became  connected  with  the  N.  O.  Nelson 
Manufacturing  Company,  wholesale  plumbing  supplies,  with  main  office  in  St. 
Louis,  Missouri,  and  with  territory  covering  Illinois,  Iowa  and  Indiana.  Mr. 
Mcllreevy  resigned  in  1902  and  moved  to  Seattle,  entering  the  employ  of  the 
Crane  Company,  in  which  he  has  since  continued.  He  did  such  able,  far-sighted 
and  capable  work  that  in  June,  1908,  upon  the  opening  of  a  branch  store  in  Van- 
couver, he  was  transferred  to  this  city  and  still  remains  as  manager.  In  this 
position  his  excellent  business  and  executive  ability  have  been  called  forth 
and  the  successful  operation  of  the  local  institution  is  largely  due  to  him.  He 
has  managed  its  affairs  in  a  discriminating  way,  developing  the  business  along 


84  BRITISH    COLUMBIA 

progressive  and  modern  lines,  ably  coping  with  the  conditions  brought  about  by 
its  rapid  growth  and  making  it  what  it  is  today,  one  of  the  largest  and  most 
important  concerns  of  its  kind  in  British  Columbia. 

On  June  17,  1890,  Mr.  Mcllreevy  was  united  in  marriage  to  Miss  Emma 
Frances  Curtis,  of  Troy,  New  York,  and  they  have  one  daughter,  Ruth  Curtis, 
who  is  an  accomplished  pianist.  Mrs.  Mcllreevy  is  a  member  of  the  Methodist 
church  in  Vancouver  and  is  well  known  as  an  active  religious  worker.  Mr. 
Mcllreevy  is  identified  with  the  Vancouver  Club  and  the  Vancouver  Athletic 
Club  and  takes  an  active  and  helpful  part  in  the  work  of  the  Vancouver  Board 
of  Trade.  The  sterling  traits  of  his  character  are  well  known  to  his  fellow 
townsmen,  many  of  whom  are  glad  to  number  him  among  their  friends. 


GEORGE  DOUGLAS  BRYMNER. 

George  Douglas  Brymner,  one  of  the  honored  and  representative  citizens  of 
New  Westminster,  is  a  typical  man  of  the  age,  alert  and  enterprising,  a  student 
of  conditions  and  of  significant  problems,  and  a  cooperant  factor  in  all  that 
makes  for  the  development  and  substantial  growth  of  city  and  province.  He  is 
now  manager  here  for  the  Bank  of  Montreal  and  as  such  a  leading  figure  in  finan- 
cial circles.  He  was  born  at  Melbourne,  in  the  province  of  Quebec,  on  the  3d  of 
December,  1857,  and  is  a  son  of  Douglas  Brymner,  LL.  D.,  and  Jean  (Thomson) 
Brymner,  both  of  whom  were  natives  of  Greenock,  Scotland,  where  they  were 
reared  and  married.  Two  children  were  born  there  and  in  1857  the  family 
came  to  Canada,  settling  on  a  farm  near  Melbourne,  whence  in  1867  they  re- 
moved to  Montreal,  where  the  father  became  assistant  editor  of  the  Montreal 
Herald.  In '1870  he  was  appointed  Dominion  archivist  and  removed  to  Ottawa 
to  take  up  the  duties  of  his  office,  filling  that  position  to  the  time  of  his  death, 
which  occurred  in  1902  at  the  home  of  his  son  George  D.,  in  New  Westminster, 
while  on  a  visit  to  this  city.  He  was  then  a  man  of  seventy-nine  years,  but 
remained  active  to  the  time  of  his  death.  During  his  service  as  archivist  he 
was  honored  by  the  Queen's  University  with  the  degree  of  LL.  D.  He  was  a 
man  widely  known  and  universally  esteemed  and  honored.  His  broad  knowl- 
edge and  his  public  spirit  brought  him  into  contact  with  intelligent  men  through- 
out the  country  and  among  that  class  his  warm  friendships  were  formed. 

George  D.  Brymner  spent  his  youthful  days  under  the  parental  roof  and 
in  the  acquirement  of  his  education  attended  successively  the  Melbourne  public 
school,  the  Montreal  and  Ottawa  high  schools  and  St.  Therese  College,  in 
which  he  became  a  student  in  order  to  master  the  French  language.  His  initial 
step  in  the  business  world  was  made  in  1874  in  connection  with  the  Bank  of 
Montreal.  He  entered  the  Cornwall,  Ontario,  branch  of  that  institution  and 
subsequently  was  with  the  Bank  of  Montreal  in  Stratford  and  Almonte,  Ontario, 
where  he  served  as  accountant.  When  the  branch  bank  in  Vancouver  was 
established  he  was  sent  with  Campbell  Sweeny  to  open  this  Pacific  coast  depart- 
ment. Mr.  Brymner  continued  as  accountant  at  Vancouver  until  the  opening 
of  the  New  Westminster  branch  in  April,  1888,  when  he  was  sent  to  this  city 
as  a  sub-agent  of  the  branch  here  and  soon  afterward  his  capabilities  won 
him  recognition  in  advancement  to  the  position  of  manager,  in  which  capacity 
he  has  served  continuously  for  a  quarter  of  a  century.  The  upbuilding  of  the 
institution  is  attributable  to  his  capability,  enterprise  and  thorough  understand- 
ing of  the  banking  business.  He  recognizes  the  fact  that  the  institution  which 
most  carefully  safeguards  the  interests  of  its  patrons  is  the  most  worthy  of 
patronage,  and  in  following  that  course  he  has  won  for  the  Bank  of  Montreal 
at  New  Westminster  a  liberal  and  growing  patronage.  He  is  today  one  of 
the  best  known  men  in  this  section  of  the  province  and  is  a  recognized  authority 
on  all  financial  matters  and  problems. 


GEORGE  D.  BRYMNER 


BRITISH    COLUMBIA  87 

In  1881,  in  Stratford,  Ontario,  Mr.  Brymner  was  united  in  marriage  to 
Miss  Anna  Elizabeth  Harrison,  a  daughter  of  the  late  William  Dyne  Harrison, 
one  of  the  well  known  pioneer  farmers  of  that  section,  who  married  Miss  Lucy 
Tye,  a  member  of  one  of  the  oldest  pioneer  families  of  Ontario.  Mr.  and  Mrs. 
Brymner  have  become  the  parents  of  three  children,  but  only  one  is  now  living, 
Ethel  Dyne,  the  wife  of  F.  A.  Macrae,  manager  of  the  Bank  of  Montreal  of 
North  Vancouver.  Mr.  Brymner  is  prominent  and  popular  in  club  and  social 
circles,  holding  membership  in  the  Westminster  Club,  the  Jericho  Country 
Club,  the  Burnaby  Lake  Country  Club  and  the  British  Columbia  Golf  Club  at 
Coquitlam.  Notwithstanding  the  extent  and  importance  of  his  business  affairs, 
he  finds  time  to  cooperate  with  many  measures  and  activities  which  have  bear- 
ing upon  the  material,  intellectual  and  moral  progress1  of  the  community.  He 
is  a  member  of  the  New  Westminster  Board  of  Trade  and  for  some  years 
served  as  president  of  the  organization.  He  is  one  of  the  public-spirited  men 
of  the  city,  and  there  has  not  been  an  industrial  enterprise  established  or  any 
movement  for  the  good  of  the  community  inaugurated  in  which  he  has  not  been 
a  forceful  factor,  contributing  in  large  measure  to  the  work  of  public  progress 
and  improvement.  He  and  his  wife  are  members  of  the  Church  of  England  and 
in  other  ways  he  has  done  much  to  stimulate  the  welfare  of  city  and  surround- 
ing country.  He  has  served  as  treasurer  of  the  Royal  Agricultural  &  Industrial 
Society  since  its  organization  in  1889,  and  for  the  same  length  of  time  has  been 
a  member  of  its  board  of  managers.  His  breadth  of  view  has  recognized  not 
only  possibilities  for  his  own  advancement,  but  for  the  city's  development,  and 
his  lofty  patriotism  has  prompted  him  to  utilize  the  latter  as  quickly  and  as 
efficiently  as  the  former.  He  has  mastered  the  lessons  of  life  day  by  day  until 
his  post-graduate  work  in  the  school  of  experience  has  placed  him  with  the 
men  of  sound  judgment  and  notable  ability,  giving  him  a  place  of  leadership  in 
public  thought  and  action. 


CHARLES   H.   MACAULAY. 

In  public  activities  aside  from  business  Charles  H.  Macaulay  has  been  an 
important  factor,  cooperating  in  many  movements  which  have  been  directly  bene- 
ficial to  Vancouver  in  the  line  of  progressive  upbuilding  and  advancement.  At 
the  same  time  he  is  a  prominent  factor  in  real-estate,  insurance  and  financial 
circles  as  senior  partner  in  the  firm  of  Macaulay  &  Nicolls.  He  was  born  in 
Nova  Scotia  in  December,  1868,  his  parents  being  Donald  and  Maria  J.  (Hamil- 
ton) Macaulay.  The  father  was  engaged  in  educational  work  and  was  the  first 
teacher  in  the  Grafton  Street  grammar  school  in  Halifax.  Subsequently  he 
became  principal  of  the  county  academy  at  Amherst  and  was  for  more  than 
twenty  years  actively  and  prominently  connected  with  educational  work  in  Nova 
Scotia,  where  he  passed  away  in  1887.  The  mother  died  in  Vancouver  in  October, 
1912,  while  visiting  her  son  Charles.  In  tracing  the  ancestral  history  of  the 
family  it  is  found  that  the  Macaulays  were  among  the  earliest  Scotch  settlers, 
who  came  from  the  land  of  hills  and  heather,  to  found  homes  in  Nova  Scotia, 
arriving  there  shortly  before  1800.  The  Hamiltons,  too,  were  among  the  first 
families  of  Nova  Scotia,  the  Hamiltons  of  Kings  county  being  there  from  the 
days  of  Cornwallis.  In  the  maternal  line  Mrs.  Maria  J.  Macaulay  was  connected 
with  the  Marshalls,  who  were  United  Empire  Loyalists  from  Virginia.  Colonel 
Marshall  fought  on  the  British  side  throughout  the  Revolutionary  war  and  was 
given  a  large  tract  of  land  in  Guysborough  county,  Nova  Scotia,  in  recognition  of 
his  allegiance  to  the  crown.  John  Marshall,  an  uncle  of  Mrs.  Macaulay,  was 
speaker  of  the  house  at  Halifax. 

In  the  public  schools  of  his  native  province  Charles  H.  Macaulay  pursued  his 
education  and  in  1887  came  west  to  the  mountains.  He  was  identified  with  the 
Canadian  Pacific  Railway  in  various  capacities  during  the  construction  of  the 


88  BRITISH    COLUMBIA 

western  portion  of  that  system  prior  to  1898,  in  which  year  he  formed  a  partner- 
ship with  J.  P.  Nicolls  under  the  firm  name  of  Macaulay  &  Nicolls  for  the 
conduct  of  a  real-estate,  insurance  and  brokerage  business,  in  which  they  have 
since  continued.  Their  clientage  is  large  and  each  branch  of  their  business  is 
proving  a  profitable  investment,  the  interests  of  the  firm  being  carefully  and 
systematically  managed  and  wisely  directed  so  that  excellent  results  are  achieved. 
In  June,  1898,  in  Vancouver,  Mr.  Macaulay  was  united  in  marriage  to  Miss 
Ethel  Jean  Maclaren,  a  daughter  of  W.  H.  .Maclaren,  a  mining  man  of  British 
Columbia,  whose  father  was  one  of  the  pioneers  in  the  Cariboo,  having  gone  there 
early  in  the  '6os  and  taking  active  part  in  mining  and  development  work  in  that 
country.  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Macaulay  have  become  the  parents  of  four  children, 
Donald  M.,  Douglas  H.,  Margaret  Jean  and  John  Alexander.  The  parents  hold 
membership  in  St.  John's  Presbyterian  church.  Mrs.  Macaulay  is  an  active  and 
interested  member  of  various  social  clubs  and  societies  in  the  city  and  is  vice 
president  of  the  Woman's  Canadian  Club.  Mr.  Macaulay  belongs  to  the  Western 
Gate  lodge  of  Masonry,  in  which  he  is  a  past  master,  and  he  also  holds  member- 
ship in  the  Terminal  City,  Shaughnessy  Heights  Golf,  Jericho  Country  and 
Canadian  Clubs.  He  is  likewise  a  member  of  the  Board  of  Trade  and  is  inter- 
ested in  all  projects  and  measures  for  the  public  welfare.  He  was  one  of  the 
organizers  of  the  Tourist  Association  and  served  as  its  president  and  one  of  its 
directors  until  1911,  when  it  was  merged  into  the  Progress  Club,  of  which  Mr. 
Macaulay  was  president  until  a  recent  date.  This  club,  as  its  name  indicates,  has 
been  a  factor  in  exploiting  the  resources  of  Vancouver  and  British  Columbia, 
and  its  work  has  been  an  important  element  in  general  improvement  and  upbuild- 
ing, Mr.  Macaulay  as  president  largely  guiding  its  efforts  in  that  direction.  In 
politics  he  is  a  conservative  and,  although  interested  in  the  questions  and  issues 
of  the  day,  has  never  been  an  active  worker  in  political  ranks.  His  time  and 
efforts  are  fully  occupied  by  his  business  activities,  in  which  he  is  meeting  with 
substantial  and  gratifying  success,  and  with  his  public  service,  whereby  the 
general  interests  are  greatly  augmented. 


JAMES  Z.  HALL. 

Among  the  many  enterprising  business  men  who  are  interested  in  handling 
mining  and  timber  properties  and  who  also  conduct  a  loan,  insurance  and  general 
real-estate  business,  is  numbered  James  Z.  Hall,  of  Vancouver,  who  dates  his 
residence  here  from  1885,  at  which  time  the  city  was  a  village  known  as  Gran- 
ville.  He  has  since  been  an  interested  witness  of  its  development  and  growth 
and  has  at  all  times  borne  his  part  in  the  \vork  of  general  progress  and  improve- 
ment. He  was  born  near  Toronto,  Ontario,  February  12,  1863,  and  is  a  son  of 
John  and  Isabella  Hall  and  a  grandson  of  James  Hall,  of  Leeds,  England,  who 
was  one  of  the  pioneer  settlers  of  Ontario. 

In  the  acquirement  of  his  early  education  James  Z.  Hall  attended  the  public 
schools  of  Toronto  and  afterward  continued  his  studies  in  the  grammar  school 
at  Niagara,  Ontario.  He  started  in  the  business  world  in  connection  with  the 
building  industry,  remaining  for  a  few  months  in  his  father's  employ  in  Ontario. 
In  the  meantime,  in  1882,  he  secured  an  intermediate  grade  B  certificate  from  the 
Niagara  grammar  school,  entitling  him  to  teach  and  later  in  the  same  year  he 
came  to  British  Columbia  with  the  intention  of  following  that  profession.  He 
made  his  way  to  New  Westminster  where  he  found  that  salaries  paid  to  teachers 
were  so  small  that  he  deemed  it  unwise  to  secure  a  school.  He  therefore  worked 
in  the  building  line  for  three  or  four  months  and  subsequently  entered  the  em- 
ploy of  T.  R.  Pearson  &  Company,  of  New  Westminster,  in  the  stationery 
business,  continuing  in  that  employ  for  about  four  years.  In  1885  he  came  to 
Vancouver  and  opened  a  branch  store  for  T.  R.  Pearson  &  Company,  conducting 
the  business  at  the  time  of  the  great  fire  of  1886,  which  destroyed  the  store.  The 


JAMES  Z.  HALL 


BRITISH    COLUMBIA  91 

business  was  shortly  afterward  sold  to  the  British  Columbia  Stationery  &  Print- 
ing Company,  at  which  time  Mr.  Hall  took  over  the  management  of  the  Van- 
couver branch  of  the  real-estate  business  of  Major  &  Pearson,  of  New  West- 
minster, who  established  their  branch  in  Vancouver  after  the  fire.  His  four 
years'  experience  in  that  connection  proved  to  Mr.  Hall  that  he  might  win  suc- 
cess if  he  operated  independently  along  the  same  line  and  in  1890  he  started  in 
business  on  his  own  account,  handling  loans,  insurance,  real-estate,  mines  and 
timber.  He  is  today  one  of  the  oldest  representatives  of  this  field  of  activity 
in  Vancouver  and  in  the  twenty-three  years  of  his  connection  with  the  business 
has  made  continuous  progress  and  won  substantial  success.  In  1910  the  business 
was  incorporated  as  J.  Z.  Hall  &  Company,  Ltd..  with  Mr.  Hall  as  the  presi- 
dent, which  office  he  has  since  filled.  He  is  familiar  with  all  the  various  phases 
of  the  different  departments  of  his  business,  knows  thoroughly  the  natural 
resources  of  the  country  as  to  mining  properties  and  timber  and  has  a  good 
clientage  in  his  loan,  insurance  and  real-estate  departments. 

On  the  ist  of  November,  1893,  in  the  Church  of  the  Redeemer  at  Toronto, 
Ontario,  Mr.  Hall  wedded  Miss  Jessie  C.  Greer,  a  daughter  of  Samuel  Greer, 
one  of  the  distinguished  citizens  of  the  province  of  British  Columbia,  who  for 
ten  years  fought  the  Canadian  Pacific  Railway  for  possession  of  his  preemption 
at  Greer's  Beach  in  the  city  of  Vancouver,  the  estimated  value  of  the  property 
reaching  several  millions,  the  Canadian  Pacific  attempting  to  dispossess  him. 
Mr.  and  Mrs.  Hall  have  become  parents  of  four  children,  Libbie  C.,  Kathleen 
Alaida,  Jessie  Mildred  and  Winnifred  Myrtle.  In  religious  faith  Mr.  Hall  is  an 
Anglican  and  his  position  upon  the  temperance  question  is  indicated  by  his  mem- 
bership in  the  Good  Templars  and  the  Royal  Templars.  His  political  support  is 
given  to  the  conservative  party  and  his  military  experience  covers  service  with 
the  Volunteer  Artillery  Corps  of  New  Westminster  for  three  years.  After  re- 
moving to  Vancouver  he  often  walked  to  New  Westminster  to  drill.  On  one  trip 
he  left  Vancouver  at  4  o'clock  in  the  afternon  and  should  have  arrived  at  his 
destination  at  7  P.  M.,  but  it  began  snowing  and  eighteen  inches  had  fallen  by 
the  time  he  reached  there  at  9  P.  M.  He  drilled  two  hours  and  walked  back  to 
Vancouver,  arriving  home  at  4  o'clock  in  the  morning.  There  are  few  who 
would  have  shown  such  devotion  to  military  duty.  This  spirit  of  fidelity  has 
always  been  characteristic  of  Mr.  Hall,  whose  friends  know  him  to  be  a  faith- 
ful, reliable  man  in  every  relation  of  life,  so  that  the  highest  regard  is  entertained 
for  him  bv  all  who  know  him. 


THOMAS   BURGESS   BALKWILL. 

For  twenty  years  Thomas  Burgess  Balkwill  has  been  a  resident  of  Vancouver 
and  his  position  in  the  business  circles  of  the  city  is  that  of  a  member  of  the 
Simson-Balkwill  Company,  Ltd.,  in  which  he  entered  in  1909.  He  was  born 
in  London,  Ontario,  January  18,  1869,  his  parents  being  John  and  Hannah  Balk- 
will,  while  his  grandfather  was  William  Balkwill,  one  of  the  first  settlers  of 
London,  Ontario.  Reared  in  the  city  of  his  nativity,  Thomas  B.  Balkwill  there 
pursued  his  education  in  the  public  schools  and  made  his  initial  step  in  the  busi- 
ness world  at  London  in  connection  with  the  hardware  trade,  in  which  he 
remained  for  five  or  six  years.  He  afterward  removed  to  Toronto,  Ontario, 
where  he  continued  in  business  for  two  or  three  years.  In  1893  he  came  to  Van- 
couver and  was  employed  for  about  sixteen  years  by  the  firm  of  Boyd,  Burns  & 
Company,  ship  chandlers  and  wholesale  dealers  in  engineering  supplies.  He 
thoroughly  acquainted  himself  with  every  phase  of  the  trade  during  that  period 
and  gained  much  valuable  experience  and  knowledge,  which  has  been  of  great 
assistance  to  him  since  he  started  in  business  on  his  own  account.  The  Simson- 
Balkwill  Company,  Ltd.,  was  incorporated  in  1909,  buying  out  a  portion  of  the 
business  of  Boyd,  Burns  &  Company,  since  which  time  they  have  operated  sue- 


92  BRITISH    COLUMBIA 

cessfully,  building  up  a  business  which  is  now  of  gratifying  proportions.  In 
addition  Mr.  Balkwill  has  some  real-estate  investments,  but  he  devotes  most  of 
his  time  to  his  business,  Mr.  Simson  being  the  president  and  managing  director. 

On  the  22d  of  June,  1903,  in  Vancouver,  Mr.  Balkwill  was  united  in  marriage 
to  Miss  Jennie  Florence,  daughter  of  Albert  E.  Blackburn,  the  family  coming 
from  Smith's  Falls,  Ontario.  Mr.  Balkwill  holds  membership  in  the  Anglican 
church  and  with  the  Knights  of  Pythias.  His  influence  is  always  on  the  side  of 
right  and  progress,  of  justice  and  improvement.  His  activities  are  largely  con- 
centrated upon  his  business  affairs,  which  are  growing  rapidly  and  therefore  are 
making  greater  and  greater  demand  upon  his  attention. 


JOSEPH  HENRY  BOWMAN. 

In  the  fall  of  1888  Joseph  Henry  Bowman  took  up  his  residence  in  Vancouver 
and  from  that  time  to  the  present  has  been  an  important  factor  in  the  growth 
of  the  city,  founding  a  notable  work  of  public  service  upon  energy,  public  spirit 
and  the  ability  which  commands  opportunity.  He  is  today  one  of  the  foremost 
architects  in  the  city,  controlling  an  extensive  and  representative  patronage, 
and  his  individual  success  is  well  deserved,  supplementing  as  it  does  valuable 
work  along  public  lines.  He  was  born  in  London,  England,  January  24,  1864, 
and  is  a  son  of  William  B.  and  Margaret  (Pearson)  Bowman,  the  former  a 
master  builder,  wTho  followed  that  occupation  in  London  until  his  death  in  1895. 
He  was  a  native  of  Cumberland  county  and  descended  from  a  long  line  of  sea- 
faring people.  He  married  Margaret  Pearson,  a  daughter  of  William  Pearson, 
a  sea  captain  of  Whitehaven,  Cumberland  county. 

Joseph  H.  Bowman  acquired  his  early  education  at  the  Sir  Walter  Singen 
school,  a  religious  institution  on  High  street,  Battersea,  London.  This  was 
later  supplemented  by  an  architectural  course  in  the  department  of  science  and 
art  of  the  South  Kensington  Museum.  His  first  employment  was  as  draughts- 
man for  William  Rendell,  designer,  with  whom  he  remained  for  two  years 
thereafter,  entering  his  father's  employ  at  the  end  of  that  time.  He  remained 
active  in  the  building  construction  business  until  the  early  part  of  the  year  1888, 
when  he  removed  to  Canada,  where  for  a  short  time  he  was  in  the  employ  of 
the  Canadian  Pacific  Railway  Company  on  construction  work  in  the  mountains. 
When  he  resigned  this  position  he  went  to  Donald,  British  Columbia,  and  was  there 
active  in  general  construction  work  until  September,  1888,  when  he  came  to 
Vancouver.  He  found  a  little  village  on  the  site  of  the  present  flourishing  city 
but  he  recognized  a  true  opportunity  and  located  permanently  here,  where  he 
has  since  remained  an  honored  and  respected  resident.  At  this  time  he  had  few 
assets  beyond  his  ability  in  his  profession  and  his  unwavering  determination,  but 
with  characteristic  energy  he  applied  himself  to  any  work  he  could  find  to  do, 
being  variously  employed  until  1897,  when  he  became  connected  with  the  British 
Columbia  Mills,  Timber  &  Trading  Company  as  draughtsman.  He  remained 
with  this  concern  for  eleven  years,  rising  to  the  position  of  head  draughtsman 
and  evidencing  at  this  time  an  unusual  ability  in  his  profession  and  knowledge  of 
its  details,  upon  which  his  present  success  is  founded.  In  1908  he  entered  into 
business  for  himself  and  the  years  since  that  time  have  brought  him  substantial 
success  and  prominence  in  his  chosen  line  of  work,  he  being  today  recognized  as 
one  of  the  foremost  architects  in  Vancouver.  He  makes  a  specialty  of  school 
architecture  and  has  designed  and  superintended  the  construction  of  many  of  the 
larger  schools  in  Vancouver  and  vicinity,  notably  those  in  South  Vancouver. 
He  controls  a  large  and  important  patronage,  for  his  ability  is  widely  known  and 
respected,  his  buildings  being  always  adequate  and  convenient,  while  showing 
rare  beauty  of  design  and  artistic  workmanship. 

On  the  I4th  of  November,  1892,  in  Vancouver,  Mr.  Bowman  was  united  in 
marriage  to  Miss  Gertrude  Mann,  a  daughter  of  J.  W.  Mann,  and  they  have 


JOSEPH  H.  BOWMAN 


BRITISH    COLUMBIA  95 

become  the  parents  of  seven  children,  Ethel,  Dorothy,  Phyllis,  Evelyn,  Sidney, 
Irene  and  Margery.  Mr.  Bowman  is  a  member  of  the  British  Columbia  Society 
of  Architects  and  belongs  to  the  Church  of  England,  acting  at  present  as  warden 
of  the  St.  John's  church,  Central  Park.  He  has  been  for  twenty-five  years  a 
resident  of  Vancouver  and  for  the  greater  portion  of  this  time  he  has  lived  in 
what  is  known  as  Central  Park.  When  he  located  here  on  seven  acres  of  land 
which  he  purchased  from  the  government  he  found  it  a  veritable  wilderness 
and  he  has  watched  it  grow  into  one  of  the  most  attractive  suburbs  of  Vancouver, 
a  worthy  addition  to  that  thriving  and  beautiful  city.  Mr.  Bowman  has  always 
taken  a  prominent  part  in  public  affairs  of  South  Vancouver,  being  a  member 
of  one  of  the  first  school  boards  soon  after  the  formation  of  this  municipality, 
and  has  been  one  of  the  greatest  individual  factors  in  its  growth,  the  influence 
of  his  work  and  personality  being  felt  as  a  strong  force  along  many  lines.  His 
present  position  among  the  men  of  marked  ability  and  substantial  worth  in  this 
community  has  been  achieved  through  earnest  and  well  directed  labor,  for  he 
has  steadily  worked  his  way  upward  to  success  and  prominence,  the  structure  of 
his  life  standing  upon  the  firm  foundation  of  honor,  integrity  and  upright 
dealing. 


NINIAN   H.    BAIN. 

No  man  in  the  province  of  British  Columbia  is  more  justly  entitled  to  the 
proud  name  of  self-made  man  than  Ninian  H.  Bain,  who  rose  from  a  humble 
position  to  the  important  office  of  managing  director  of  the  Strathcona  Packing 
Company,  Limited,  of  Vancouver,  and  as  such  occupied  not  only  a  foremost 
place  in  his  particular  industry  but  was  a  leading  representative  of  the  commer- 
cial life  of  his  city  and  province.  He  retired  from  his  arduous  duties  in  the  fall 
of  1911,  and  is  now  enjoying  a  well  earned  rest  after  a  life  rich  in  achievements. 
Mr.  Bain  was  born  in  Chatham,  New  Brunswick,  on  January  14,  1854,  and  is  a 
son  of  Hugh  and  Ann  Bain.  His  home  training  was  admirable,  and  in  his  youth- 
ful consciousness  were  early  instilled  the  old-fashioned  virtues  of  industry  and 
energy,  which  have  ever  been  his  standard  and  have  guided  him  to  success.  In 
the  acquirement  of  his  education  he  attended  the  Presbyterian  Academy  at 
Chatham,  and  after  working  in  his  native  city  for  several  years  along  various 
lines  he  came  in  1879  to  British  Columbia,  beginning  his  career  in  the  humble 
position  of  laboring  man  with  the  Ewen  Company.  Ambitious  to  rise  in  the 
world  and  to  improve  his  condition,  he  employed  most  of  his  spare  time  in  study- 
ing and  had  soon  progressed  to  such  an  extent  that  he  was  enabled  to  accept  the 
position  of  bookkeeper  with  the  firm  of  Laidlaw  &  Company.  In  that  connection 
he  ably  performed  his  duties  and  earned  high  commendation  from  his  employers. 
His  first  connection  with  the  packing  industry  was  in  the  employ  of  the  Pacific 
Coast  Company,  with  whom  he  remained  for  a  considerable  time,  gradually 
acquiring  a  stockholder's  interest.  Steadily  advancing  and  climbing  the  ladder  of 
success  rung  by  rung,  he  became  manager  of  the  British  Columbia  Packers  Asso- 
ciation when  this  company  bought  out  the  Pacific  Coast  Company,  and  remained 
in  that  office  for  four  years.  He  then  organized  the  Strathcona  Packing  Company 
on  the  north  coast  of  British  Columbia,  and  becoming  its  managing  director, 
continued  so  until  the  fall  of  1911,  when  he  sold  his  entire  interests  to  the  Wallace 
Fisheries  Company.  In  building  up  and  extending  the  scope  of  the  business  of 
the  Strathcona  Packing  Company  he  had  been  most  instrumental,  this  concern 
being  principally  engaged  in  the  canning  of  salmon,  and  in  that  connection  he  did 
much  to  promote  this  important  industry.  His  successful  management  of  his 
affairs  enabled  him  to  retire  in  the  fall  of  1911  and,  looking  back  upon  a  life  rich 
in  labor  but  also  rich  in  success,  he  occupies  an-  honored  position  among  the  sub- 
stantial men  of  his  city. 


96  BRITISH    COLUMBIA 

In  1888  Ninian  H.  Bain  was  united  in  marriage  to  Miss  Ida  Ladner,  a 
daughter  of  William  Ladner,  and  who  has  since  passed  away.  In  1899  he  married 
Mary  Johnston  Main,  of  New  Brunswick.  Mr.  Bain  is  the  father  of  two 
daughters:  Rhona,  born  of  his  first  marriage,  who  is  the  wife  of  George  R. 
McQueen,  a  well  known  barrister  of  Vancouver ;  and  Jenette  Bernette,  who  was 
born  of  his  second  union  and  makes  her  home  with  her  parents.  The  family 
residence  is  at  No.  1305  Barclay  street  and  there  Mr.  and  Mrs;  Bain  frequently 
entertain  a  charming  circle  of  friends.  His  recreation  consists  largely  of  travel- 
ing and  shooting,  along  which  lines  he  finds  that  needed  diversion  which  main- 
tains a  healthy  mind  in  a  healthy  body.  He  is  a  member  of  the  Terminal  City 
Club,  in  which  he  is  popular  and  highly  esteemed.  Mr.  Bain  has  ever  taken  an 
active  and  helpful  part  in  all  worthy  enterprises  promoted  to  advance  the  public 
interests  and  can  ever  be  found  in  the  front  ranks  of  those  who  willingly  enlist 
their  ability,  time  and  money  in  order  to  further  commercial  expansion  and  the 
betterment  of  moral  and  intellectual  life. 


CHARLES  EDWIN  CLIFF. 

Charles  Edwin  Cliff,  one  of  the  wealthy  and  leading  citizens  of  New  West- 
minster, has  lived  practically  retired  for  more  than  a  year,  now  giving  his  atten- 
tion almost  wholly  to  the  management  of  his  financial  interests.  During  a  long 
and  active  business  career  he  has  overcome  obstacles  and  adversity  which  would 
have  discouraged  many  a  man  of  less  resolute  purpose,  and  his  energy  and 
perseverance  have  won  their  just  reward.  He  was  the  founder  of  the  firm  of 
Cliff  &  Sons,  well  known  can  manufacturers.  His  birth  occurred  in  Kingston, 
Ontario,  on  the  28th  of  May,  1854,  his  parents  being  George  and  Charlotte 
(Pearson)  Cliff,  the  former  a  native  of  Nottinghamshire  and  the  latter  of  Sussex, 
England.  They  came  to  Canada  with  their  respective  parents  in  young  man- 
hood and  young  womanhood.  George  Cliff,  the  paternal  grandfather  of  our 
subject,  settled  in  Montreal,  while  the  maternal  grandfather,  Allen  Pearson, 
took  up  his  abode  in  Kingston,  Ontario.  The  former  was  a  surveyor  as  well 
as  an  architect,  and  he  it  was  who  surveyed  the  macadamized  York  road  from 
Kingston  to  Toronto.  The  cut  stone  mileposts  which  he  set  along  the  boulevard 
are  still  standing  and  will  probably  remain  for  many  more  years. 

George  Cliff,  Jr.,  served  a  seven  years'  apprenticeship  at  architectural  draw- 
ing and  surveying  under  the  direction  of  his  father,  and  in  association  with 
him  built  the  city  hall  and  many  of  the  most  important  buildings  of  Montreal 
and  Kingston  at  that  time.  He  subsequently  removed  to  Napanee  and  became 
a  prominent  factor  in  building  circles  there,  his  demise  occurring  in  that  city 
in  1898,  Avhen  he  had  attained  the  ripe  old  age  of  eighty-four  years.  His  wife 
passed  away  when  about  fifty  years  of  age.  George  Cliff,  Jr.,  cast  the  deciding 
vote  which  first  put  Sir  John  A.  MacDonald  into  power.  The  vote  was  then 
an  open  one  and  could  be  counted  at  any  time  during  the  voting.  A  few  minutes 
before  the  closing  of  the  polls,  one  of  MacDonald's  friends  rushed  to  the  shop 
of  Mr.  Cliff,  telling  him  that  all  the  votes  were  in  except  those  of  himself  and 
his  workmen,  and  as  MacDonald  was  one  vote  behind,  he  would  be  defeated 
unless  Mr.  Cliff  and  his  workmen  cast  their  votes  for  him.  The  messenger  was 
told  that  the  workman  favored  the  opposition,  but  he  urged  Mr.  Cliff  to  use  his 
influence  with  him.  and  thus  MacDonald  won  the  election. 

Charles  E.  Cliff,  whose  name  introduces  this  review,  was  reared  under  the 
parental  roof  and  attended  the  public  schools  of  Napanee  in  the  acquirement  of 
an  education.  In  his  seventeenth  year  he  was  bound  out  to  a  Napanee  tinsmith 
for  n  fiv  vears'  apprenticeship,  serving  the  first  year  for  one  hundred  dollars, 
the  second  year  for  one  hundred  and  ten  dollars,  the  third  year  for  one  hundred 
and  twenty  dollars  and  the  fourth  and  fifth  years  for  one  hundred  qnd  thirtv  and 
one  hundred  and  fifty  dollars,  respectively.  The  remuneration  did  not  include 


CHARLES   E.   CLIFF 


BRITISH    COLUMBIA  99 

board,  and  his  father  gave  bond  that  he  would  not  break  the  terms  of  the  agree- 
ment. After  completing  his  apprenticeship  he  drew  a  salary  of  one  dollar  and 
twenty-five  cents  for  a  ten-hour  day,  and  in  1876  was  married  at  St.  Marys 
and  established  a  home  on  this  meager  income.  For  about  five  years  he  worked 
as  a  journeyman  at  St.  Marys  and  later  embarked  in  business  on  his  own  account. 
Subsequently  he  spent  about  nine  months  in  Chicago  and  thence  went  to  Bath, 
Ontario,  where  he  established  himself  in  business.  In  1888  he  came  to  New  West- 
minster, British  Columbia,  making  his  way  to  this  province  at  the  request  of 
James  Cunningham,  the  hardware  merchant,  in  whose  service  he  remained  for  a 
year.  On  the  expiration  of  that  period  he  went  to  Nanaimo,  there  working  as  a 
journeyman  for  one  year  and  then  returning  to  New  Westminster.  Here  he 
embarked  in  business  with  two  partners  under  the  firm  style  of  Corbett  &  Cliff. 
Being  dissatisfied  with  the  management  of  his  partners,  however,  he  signed  away 
his  interest  for  his  release  from  the  concern  and  was  at  that  time  two  hundred 
dollars  in  debt.  Mr.  Cliff  then  started  in  business  alone,  but  disposed  of  his  inter- 
ests shortly  prior  to  the  Westminster  fire  of  1898,  which  wiped  out  his  estab- 
lishment, and  he  never  received  a  cent  in  payment  therefor.  Nevertheless,  though 
disaster  had  now  twice  overtaken  him,  he  started  out  anew  with  undaunted  spirit, 
and,  cleaning  out  his  chicken  house,  began  making  butter  cans  for  the  New 
Westminster  creamery.  After  the  cans  were  made  he  would  go  to  the  factory 
and  seal  them  when  they  were  filled,  receiving  fifty  cents  an  hour  for  this  work. 
From  this  small  beginning  evolved  the  extensive  can  plant  of  Cliff  &  Sons  in  East 
Burnaby,  which  now  has  a  capacity  of  from  two  hundred  and  fifty  thousand 
to  three  hundred  thousand  cans  daily.  In  February,  1912,  Mr.  Cliff  retired  from 
the  active  control  of  the  concern,  at  that  time  turning  the  business  over  to  his  two 
sons,  who  have  since  disposed  of  the  business  to  the  American  Can  Company. 
He  is  a  director  of  the  Industrial  Properties  Company,  Limited,  and  now  devotes 
his  attention  almost  exclusively  to  the  management  of  his  financial  interests. 

In  1876  Mr.  Cliff  was  joined  in  wedlock  to  Miss  Mary  Edgeley  Bickell,  of 
St.  Marys,  Ontario,  her  father  being  Thomas  Bickell,  who  for  many  years  was 
a  merchant  in  Quebec  and  subsequently  became  a  commercial  salesman.  In 
his  political  views  Mr.  Cliff  is  a  conservative,  and  for  about  seven  years  he 
served  as  councilman  in  East  Burnaby.  His  religious  faith  is  indicated  by  his 
membership  in  Queens  Avenue  Methodist  church,  to  which  his  wife  also  belongs. 
The  period  of  his  residence  in  British  Columbia  covers  more  than  a  quarter  of 
a  century,  and  by  his  own  efforts  he  has  gained  a  place  among  the  leading  and 
representative  citizens  of  the  province.  His  record  should  serve  to  encourage 
and  inspire  others,  showing  what  may  be  accomplished  when  one  has  the  will 
to  dare  and  to  do. 


ADAM   SMITH  JOHNSTON. 

Adam  Smith  Johnston,  barrister  and  solicitor  of  New  Westminster,  has  an 
extensive  practice  which  makes  continuous  demands  upon  his  time.  He  is  one 
of  the  younger  members  of  the  bar,  but  has  already  gained  a  practice  that  many 
an  older  representative  of  the  profession  might  well  envy.  He  was  born  in 
Huron  county,  Ontario,  on  the  5th  of  April,  1888,  and  is  a  son  of  John  and 
Margaret  J.  Johnston.  His  education  was  acquired  in  the  schools  of  Toronto  and 
New  Westminster,  for  he  came  to  British  Columbia  in  1902,  when  a  youth  of 
fourteen  years.  Determining  to  make  the  practice  of  law  his  life  work,  he  began 
reading  in  the  office  and  under  the  direction  of  Howay,  Reid  &  Bowes,  while 
later  he  was  with  Anson,  Whealler,  McBride  &  Kennedy.  He  afterward  read 
with  the  Hon.  W.  Norman  Boles,  K.  C.,  and  was  called  to  the  British  Columbia 
bar  in  1910.  He  was  admitted  as  a  partner  to  the  firm  of  Whiteside,  Edmonds 
&  Johnston  in  1911,  practicing  in  that  connection  until  1912,  since  which  time  he 
has  followed  his  profession  independently  and  has  gained  an  extensive  clientele, 

Vol.  Ill— 4 


100 

being  today  recognized  as  one  of  the  leading  barristers  as  well  as  one  of  the 
leading  younger  members  of  the  Westminster  bar.  Along  with  those  qualities 
indispensable  to  the  successful  practitioner, — a  keen,  rapid,  logical  mind,  plus  the 
business  sense,  and  a  ready  capacity  for  hard  work, — he  brought  to  the  starting 
point  of  his  legal  career  certain  rare  gifts — eloquence  of  language  and  a  strong 
personality.  An  excellent  presence,  marked  strength  of  character,  a  thorough 
grasp  of  the  law  and  the  ability  to  accurately  apply  its  principles  are  factors  in 
his  effectiveness  as  an  advocate. 

Mr.  Johnston  is  a  conservative  in  politics  but  not  a  prominent  party  worker. 
He  belongs  to  the  Anglican  church  and  his  recreations  are  exploring  and  shooting, 
in  which  he  indulges  when  his  professional  duties  afford  him  leisure. 


THOMAS  JOHN  TRAPP. 

The  life  record  of  Thomas  John  Trapp  rivals  in  interest  and  romantic  adven- 
ture any  story  from  Jack  London's  pen,  for  he  was  closely  connected  with  the 
pioneer  history  of  the  Canadian  northwest,  participating  in  struggles  and  hard- 
ships unknown  to  the  present  generation,  passing  through  Indian  outbreaks,  and 
enduring  privations  and  even  hunger.  He  has  become  today  one  of  the  foremost 
merchants  of  New  Westminster  as  the  principal  owner  and  the  founder  of  the 
firm  of  T.  J.  Trapp  &  Company,  Ltd.,  and  a  dominant  factor  in  the  business  life 
of  the  city.  His  is,  indeed,  a  remarkable  record,  for  he  took  the  step  from  day 
laborer  to  one  of  the  most  substantial  men  of  a  flourishing  city,  breasting  all  ob- 
stacles until  he  has  reached  the  top.  The  man  who  became  this  dominant  factor 
in  the  development  of  British  Columbia  was  born  in  Waltham  Abbey,  in  the  county 
of  Essex,  England,  on  June  4,  1842,  a  son  of  Thomas  Trapp,  who  was  a  forest 
ranger  for  Sir  Heribwald  Wake  and  surveyor  for  the  town  of  Waltham  Abbey. 
In  his  religious  convictions  the  father  was  a  Baptist.  He  died  in  his  sixty-seventh 
year  and  subsequently  his  widow,  Elizabeth  (Guy)  Trapp,  came  to  British  Co- 
lumbia, making  New  Westminster  her  home  until  the  time  of  her  demise,  her 
death  occurring  at  the  age  of  seventy-seven  years. 

Thomas  J.  Trapp  was  reared  and  educated  in  his  native  town  and  began  his 
career  as  a  clerk  in  a  grocery  store,  becoming  subsequently  a  commercial  salesman 
for  a  wholesale  manufacturing  house  in  London.  In  1872  he  came  to  Canada, 
locating  in  St.  Thomas,  Ontario,  beginning  life  in  the  new  world  at  the  bottom  of 
the  ladder.  He  began  as  day  laborer,  with  pick  and  shovel,  in  the  construction  of 
the  Canada  Southern  Railroad,  and  also  worked  in  a  general  store  in  Buckston, 
Kent  county,  Ontario.  His  clear  judgment,  however,  pointed  to  the  west  as  the 
land  of  opportunities  and  on  April  23,  1873,  he  arrived  in  Victoria  and  soon 
thereafter  came  to  New  Westminster.  He  packed  his  blankets  over  the  trail  to 
Burrard  Inlet  and  then  to  Hastings  Sawmill.  After  spending  two  weeks  without 
securing  employment  he  found  a  position  at  loading  a  ship  with  spars,-  receiving 
three  dollars  per  day  and  bunking  with  the  sailors.  After  this  task  was  com- 
pleted he  again  returned  to  New  Westminster  and  later  to  Victoria.  He  was 
subsequently  employed  at  Spring  Ridge  at  digging  a  ditch  and  cutting  cordwood 
at  a  dollar  and  twenty-five  cents  per  cord  for  dry  wood  and  one  dollar  for  green 
wood.  While  there  he  walked  to  church  and  Sunday  school  every  Sunday,  the 
distance  being  nine  miles,  this  little  incident  permitting  a  glimpse  of  the  true 
Christian  spirit  that  permeates  his  being.  Later  on  he  was  employed  in  the  dry- 
goods  store  of  A.  B.  Gray,  receiving  as  compensation  forty  dollars  per  month, 
which,  however,  soon  was  raised  to  seventy-five  dollars.  In  the  spring  of  1874 
he  joined  the  rush  to  the  Cassiar  gold  fields,  but  not  meeting  the  desired  success, 
he  returned  and  engaged  in  the  stock  business  at  Nicola  and  at  Kamloops.  While 
there  he  was  employed  to  take  charge  of  a  pack  train  with  supplies  for  the  sur- 
veyors engaged  in  locating  the  route  of  the  Canadian  Pacific,  who  were  then  on 
Yellowhead  Pass.  Arriving  at  the  Athabasca  depot,  he  found  that  the  surveying 


THOMAS  J.  TRAPP 


BRITISH    COLUMBIA  103 

party  had  left  for  the  east,  letters  of  instructions  being  left  on  the  eastern  slopes. 
The  Athabasca  depot  was  established  by  the  Moberly  party.  The  supplies  were 
then  stored  at  this  point  and  the  cattle  and  horses  taken  on  to  the  Bow  river, 
where  they  were  wintered.  At  the  Hardesty  river  H.  A.  F.  McLeod,  who  had 
charge  of  the  eastern  division,  was  met  and  made  arrangements  with  Mr.  Trapp 
to  take  charge  of  the  Athabasca  depot  with  the  supplies.  Mr.  Trapp  then  re- 
turned with  Michael  O'Keefe  to  that  point,  where  they  remained  until  the  follow- 
ing September  or  nearly  a  year.  During  the  winter  the  Indians  and  half-breeds 
ran  short  of  ammunition  and  starvation  was  threatened  among  them  as  a  conse- 
quence, so  Mr.  Trapp  volunteered  to  cross  the  mountains,  one  hundred  miles  to 
the  nearest  supply  station,  the  Tete  Juane  Cache,  and  bring  back  the  needed  am- 
munition. He  began  his  perilous  journey  on  January  2,  1876,  with  two  half-breeds 
and  two  dogs,  the  snow  being  six  feet  deep  and  the  cold  and  hardships  encountered 
almost  beyond  endurance  of  man.  When  within  twenty  miles  of  their  destination 
the  snow  was  softened  by  a  thaw  to  such  an  extent  that  traveling  became  practi- 
cally impossible  and  they  were  forced  to  camp,  death  staring  them  in  the  face. 
They  were  in  a  most  precarious  position  and  for  part  of  the  day  and  during  all 
the  night  the  two  half-breeds  prayed  for  colder  weather  and  set  up  as  a  pro- 
pitiatory sacrifice  two  rabbits  fashioned  out  of  the  softening  snow.  Mr.  Trapp 
does  not  claim  that  these  rites  had  anything  to  do  with  the  result,  but  colder 
weather  returned  the  next  morning  and  with  it  they  traveled  on  the  top  of  the 
frozen  snow,  finally  arriving  at  the  Tete  Juane  Cache  at  eight  o'clock  in  the  even- 
ing. There  they  secured  their  supply  of  ammunition,  passing  several  days  at  the 
cache  in  order  to  recuperate  and  then  began  the  return  journey,  which  was  suc- 
cessfully accomplished.  Mr.  Trapp  remained  at  Athabasca  depot  until  September, 
when  Marcus  Smith,  a  civil  engineer,  and  party  arrived  and  he  returned  to  Kam- 
loops.  In  the  winter  of  1879.  the  Indian  outbreaks  occurred  in  which  the  sheriff, 
John  Usher,  and  a  sheep  herder  by  the  name  oi  Kelly  were  killed  and  John 
McLeod  was  wounded.  The  Indians  tcirorized  the  entire  countryside  and  also 
came  to  Mr.  Trapp's  place,  but  while  they  ransacked  his  cabin  and  took  his  fire- 
arms, they  left  him  unharmed,  although  Kelly  was  killed  but  two  and  a  half 
miles  further  along  the  road.  The  Indians  were  surrounded  and  captured  at 
Douglas  lake  and  subsequently  four  of  them  were  hanged.  Mr.  Trapp  being  called 
as  witness  against  them.  During  this  winter  he  lost  most  of  his  live  stock  on 
account  of  the  severity  of  the  weather  and  this  decided  him  to  give  up  ranching 
and  to  engage  in  business  in  New  Westminster. 

The  style  of  the  firm  with  which  he  became  connected  was  R.  W.  Dean  &  Com- 
pany on  its  organization,  Mr.  Trapp  and  his  brother  Samuel  constituting  the  com- 
pany. Later  the  Trapp  brothers  bought  out  the  interests  of  the  others  and 
conducted  successfully  a  general  mercantile  business  for  several  years,  which,  how- 
ever, gradually  developed  into  the  present  wholesale  and  retail  hardware  firm  of 
T.  J.  Trapp  &  Company,  one  of  the  most  important  business  corporations  in  New 
Westminster.  In  1912-13  Mr.  Trapp  built  one  of  the  handsomest  and  most  sub- 
stantial business  structures  in  this  city  to  house  his  extensive  enterprise,  which  will 
stand  for  many  years  as  a  monument  to  his  ability  and  his  incessant  efforts  and 
energy.  The  influence  of  his  activities  upon  the  commercial  expansion  of  New 
Westminster  needs  no  further  illustration,  as  it  is  evidenced  by  the  foremost  posi- 
tion his  business  occupies  among  the  commercial  institutions  of  British  Columbia. 
He  was  one  of  twelve  men  who  built  the  New  Westminster  Southern  Railroad,  of 
which  he  has  been  secretary  since  its  inception.  The  corporation  never  received 
a  dollar  from  the  government  and  is  the  only  road  ever  built  in  the  Dominion 
without  a  subsidy.  It  is  now  a  part  of  the  Great  Northern  system.  He  has  like- 
wise been  president  of  the  Westminster  Trust  since  its  organization,  became  sec- 
retary of  the  Board  of  Trade  at  its  inception  and  for  three  years  was  its  president. 
He  was  likewise  one  of  the  committee  of  three  that  established  the  city  market  at 
New  Westminster. 

In  1886  Mr.  Trapp  was  united  in  marriage  to  Miss  Nellie  K.  Dockrill,  a  native 
of  Canada  and  a  daughter  of  Joseph  Dockrill.  To  this  union  were  born  eight 


104  BRITISH    COLUMBIA 

children :  Edith  Kathleen,  Thomas  Dockrill;  Stanley  Valentine,  Ethelyn,  Juanita, 
George,  Donovan  and  Dorothy.  The  family  are  devoted  members  of  the  Presby- 
terian church,  taking  an  active  and  helpful  part  in  the  work  of  that  organization, 
to  which  Mr.  Trapp  gives  his  material  and  moral  support.  He  is  also  interested 
in  other  activities  looking  to  the  uplifting  of  the  community,  is  president  of  the 
Young  Men's  Christian  Association  and  gave  the  lot  on  which  the  association 
building  was  erected. 

For  the  past  twenty-three  years  Mr.  Trapp  has  been  an  active  member  of  the 
Royal  Agricultural  &  Industrial  Society  of  British  Columbia,  being  president  of 
the  board  for  twenty  years.  On  retiring  from  the  presidency  Mr.  Trapp  was 
presented  with  the  following  address :  "We,  the  officers  and  executive  of  the 
Royal  Agricultural  Society  cannot  permit  the  occasion  of  your  retirement  from 
the  presidency  to  pass  without  expressing  our  sincere  regret  that  the  burden  of 
years  together  with  the  claims  of  other  interests  make  you  feel  the  necessity  of 
retiring  from  that  position.  During  the  twenty  years  you  have  been  president, 
there  have  been  great  changes  in  the  agricultural,  industrial  and  commercial  life 
of  the  province.  Our  city  has  greatly  increased  its  population  and  importance, 
and  our  society  has  thrown  off  its  swaddling  clothes  of  infancy  and  now  occupies 
a  place  among  the  foremost  of  such  institutions  on  this  continent.  In  this  de- 
velopment both  in  the  society,  the  city  and  the  province  you  have  been  a  most 
important  factor.  The  strong,  firm  hand  with  which  you  have  guided  its  affairs, 
your  executive  gifts,  your  advocacy  of  progressive  motive,  your  willingness  to 
sacrifice  personal  interests  for  the  general  welfare,  have  placed  the  society  in 
the  enviable  position  it  occupies  today.  Your  business  ability,  integrity  and  zeal 
together  with  your  public  spirit  and  unselfish  devotion  to  the  best  interests  of  the 
city  have  materially  aided  in  its  advancement  and  your  constant  advocacy  and 
efforts  to  secure  good  roads,  improved  stock,  better  methods  of  land  cultivation 
and  good  seeds  have  done  much' in  the  development  of  the  agricultural  life  of  this 
province.  Few  have  filled  so  commanding  a  position  for  so  many  years  with  so 
much  credit  to  themselves  and  so  much  satisfaction  to  those  associated  with  them. 
We  have  admired  the  sterling  qualities  of  your  manhood — a  sturdy  sample  of 
the  men  of  the  west — your  genial  spirit  and  gentlemanly  bearing  that  has  made 
all  of  our  work  with  you  so  pleasant  and  the  perfect  abandon  with  which  you 
gave  yourself  to  every  enterprise  with  which  you  were  connected.  We  congratu- 
late you  on  the  splendid  work  well  done,  the  large  place  it  is  still  your  good  for- 
tune to  fill  in  the  industrial  and  commercial  life  of  our  city  and  the  honorable 
place  you  hold  in  the  esteem  and  affection  of  your  fellow  citizens.  We  ask  you 
to  accept  this  embossed  address  and  combination  traveling  bag  as  a  slight  token  of 
our  appreciation  and  good-will  coupled  with  the  earnest  hope  that  you  and  Mrs. 
Trapp,  who  has  nobly  assisted  you  in  your  work,  may  have  every  enjoyment 
that  life  affords  and  that,  though  retiring  from  the  presidency,  we  may  continue 
to  have  the  benefit  of  your  experience  and  counsel."  In  all  the  public  offices 
which  he  has  filled  Mr.  Trapp  has  never  received  a  dollar  for  his  services  save  as 
secretary  of  the  New  Westminster  Southern  Railroad.  He  is  actuated  in  all  that 
he  does  by  a  public-spirited  devotion  to  the  general  good  and  his  labors  have  been 
far-reaching  and  beneficial  in  effect. 

Fraternally  Mr.  Trapp  is  affiliated  with  the  Ancient  Order  of  United  Work- 
men and  the  Woodmen  of  the  World.  A  business  man  of  the  modern  type, 
shrewd,  able,  progressive  and  straightforward,  careful  of  his  own  interests  and 
considerate  of  those  of  others,  he  has  been  influenced  at  all  times  by  the  thought 
of  the  broader  effect  which  his  work  has  upon  the  growth  of  his  community  and 
has  always  taken  laudable  interest  in  all  worthy  projects  undertaken  for  the  cause 
of  advancement.  The  history  of  his  career  is  a  tale  which  in  its  struggles  and  its 
final  accomplishments  should  serve  as  a  spur  and  inspiration  to  those  who  follow 
him.  The  lesson  does  not  lie  in  the  fact  that  he  has  built  up  one  of  the  most 
promising  business  enterprises  in  the  city  or  that  he  has  become  wealthy,  for  it 
is  not  his  tangible  attainments  which  inspire,  although  they  are  important,  but 


BRITISH    COLUMBIA  105 

the  fact  that  against  obstacles  and  adversity  he  has  struggled  to  success,  develop- 
ing those  qualities  which  have  made  that  success  possible  and  which  excite  the 
admiration  of  all  who  know  him. 


JOHN  ALEXANDER  MONTGOMERY. 

John  Alexander  Montgomery,  whose  residence  in  New  Westminster  dates 
from  1887,  is  today  one  of  the  best  known  and  most  highly  respected  men  of  the 
city,  each  year  having  chronicled  an  increase  in  his  prosperity  and  his  additional 
security  in  the  esteem  and  confidence  of  his  fellow  citizens.  He  was  born  in 
Drummond  county,  Quebec,  and  is  a  son  of  James  and  Jane  (Bothwell)  Mont- 
gomery, pioneers  in  that  province,  where  the  father  engaged  in  farming. 

John  A.  Montgomery  acquired  his  education  in  the  country  schools  of  his 
native  community,  and  after  laying  aside  his  books  was  obliged  on  account  of 
conditions  at  home  to  earn  his  own  livelihood.  In  choosing  an  occupation  he 
took  up  that  for  which  he  was  best  fitted  by  early  training  and  environment, 
turning  his  attention  to  general  farming.  For  a  time  he  assisted  his  father  with 
the  work  of  the  homestead,  afterwards  becoming  connected  with  railroading 
and  following  this  by  a  period  of  activity  in  the  mines.  Seeking  broader  scope 
for  his  labors  and  better  opportunities,  he  came  to  British  Columbia  in  1887  and, 
recognizing  immediately  the  splendid  future  of  New  Westminster,  took  up  his 
residence  here.  He  invested  heavily  in  land,  and  during  the  twenty-six  years  of 
his  residence  here,  has  continually  added  to  his  holdings  until  he  is  today  one  of 
the  most  extensive  owners  of  valuable  real  estate  in  the  city.  All  of  his  business 
interests  are  carefully  and  progressively  conducted  and  his  success  rewards  many 
years  of  well  directed  and  honorable  labor. 

Mr.  Montgomery  married  November  7,  1906,  Mrs.  Fannie  Huff  of  New 
Westminster  and  they  have  two  children:  Jane  Alexandra  and  Joyce  Evelyn. 
The  family  residence  is  at  403  Third  avenue,  and  is  one  of  the  most  beautiful 
and  attractive  homes  in  the  city.  A  life  of  straightforward  and  honorable 
activity,  directed  by  sound  intelligence  and  discriminating  judgment,  has  gained 
for  Mr.  Montgomery  a  high  place  in  the  respect  of  his  fellow  citizens.  He  is  a 
member  of  St.  Stephen's  Presbyterian  church  and  politically  is  identified  with  the 
conservative  party.  He  is  interested  in  public  affairs  and  has  done  much  to 
promote  the  welfare  of  the  community,  especially  by  his  able  service  as  a  member 
of  the  hospital  board.  No  man  is  more  justly  honored  in  New  Westminster, 
where  for  more  than  a  quarter  of  a  century  his  labors  have  been  a  force  in 
development. 


EWING  BUCHAN. 

Ewing  Buchan  is  manager  of  the  Bank  of  Hamilton  at  Vancouver,  and  as 
such  is  in  touch  with  the  multitudinous  duties  and  details  connected  with  banking. 
He  has  ever  recognized  the  fact  that  the  bank  which  most  carefully  safeguards 
the  interests  of  its  depositors  is  the  one  most  worthy  of  trust,  and  in  shaping 
the  policy  of  the  Vancouver  branch  he  has  tempered  progressiveness  with  a 
wise  conservatism.  A  native  of  Toronto,  Mr.  Buchan  was  born  in  August,  1852, 
a  son  of  David  and  Jane  (Griffith)  Buchan.  the  former  a  native  of  Glasgow, 
Scotland,  and  the  latter  of  Chester,  England.  For  many  years  the  father  was 
bursar  of  Upper  Canada  College  and,  reared  in  an  atmosphere  where  intellectual 
worth  is  duly  appraised,  Ewing  Buchan  was  accorded  liberal  opportunities  for 
attending  school.  He  mastered  the  preliminary  branches  of  learning  in  the 
grammar  schools  of  Paris,  Ontario,  and  then  entered  the  Upper  Canada  Col- 
lege at  Toronto.  When  his  text-books  were  laid  aside  he  accepted  a  clerical 


106  BRITISH    COLUMBIA 

position  in  the  Canadian  Bank  of  Commerce,  which  institution  he  served  as  a 
clerk  in  various  towns  in  Ontario  for  four  years.  He  next  engaged  in  the 
stock-brokerage  business  with  his  brother,  the  late  General  Lawrence  Buchan, 
in  Toronto  under  the  firm  name  of  Buchan  Brothers,  and  continued  in  that  busi- 
ness until  1880,  when  his  brother  went  to  Brandon,  Manitoba,  after  which  Ewing 
Buchan  conducted  the  brokerage  business  in  connection  with  C.  S.  Gzowski  under 
the  firm  name  of  Gzowski  &  Buchan.  This  partnership  was  maintained  until 
November,  1888,  when  the  firm  was  dissolved  and  Mr.  Buchan  entered  into 
business  relations  with  the  Bank  of  Hamilton  at  Toronto.  During  this  time 
Mr.  Buchan  compiled  and  published  Buchan's  Sterling  Exchange  Conversion 
Tables,  which  are  still  largely  in  use  in  Canada  and  the  United  States.  For  ten 
years  he  was  manager  of  the  Bank  of  Hamilton  at  Owen  Sound,  Ontario.  The 
spring  of  1904  witnessed  his  arrival  in  Vancouver,  whither  he  came  to  become 
manager  of  this  branch,  since  which  time  he  has  held  that  office.  In  the  present 
year  he  is  chairman  of  the  Vancouver  Clearing  House  and  is  a  promnient  factor 
in  financial  circles,  his  ability,  trustworthiness  and  enterprise  winning  for  him 
the  good-will  and  confidence  of  all.  He  was  in  1910  chairman  of  Vancouver 
Board  of  Trade  and  in  1911  president  of  the  Canadian  Club. 

Mr.  Buchan  married,  in  Toronto,  in  1880,  Miss  Emma  M.  King,  daughter  of 
the  late  Rev.  Joseph  D.  King,  of  Toronto.  They  became  the  parents  of  four  chil- 
dren, the  eldest  of  whom  is  Percy  Halcro,  assistant  engineer  for  the  British  Colum- 
bia Electric  Railway  Company  of  Vancouver.  Mr.  Buchan  is  a  member  of  the 
Vancouver  Club  and  the  Terminal  City  Club.  His  military  experience  covers 
service  as  a  private  in  the  Queen's  Own  Rifles  in  Toronto  during  the  period  of  his 
early  manhood.  He  was  one  of  the  first  captains  of  the  Toronto  Bicycle  Club  and 
one  of  the  first  officers  in  the  Toronto  Canoe  Club,  being  always  active  in  athletics 
and  manly  sports  during  his  residence  in  the  east.  Mr.  Buchan  has  also  achieved  re- 
nown as  an  author,  having  brought  forth  on  different  occasions  valuable  articles 
on  various  subjects.  His  sterling  traits  of  character  are  many,  his  business  ability 
is  pronounced  and  the  record  which  he  has  made  throughout  the  entire  period  of 
his  residence  in  Vancouver  has  endeared  him  to  his  fellow  citizens,  who  regard 
him  as  one  of  the  representative  financiers  of  the  northwest. 


JOHN  WALTER  MACFARLANE. 

John  Walter  Macfarlane,  who  has  been  successfully  identified  with  the 
lumber  business  at  Vancouver  for  the  past  eight  years,  has  large  timber  holdings 
both  on  the  mainland  and  the  island  and  is  engaged  in  buying,  selling  and  sur- 
veying all  kinds  of  timber  land.  His  birth  occurred  in  Renfrew,  Ontario,  in 
February,  1863,  his  parents  being  Duncan  and  Mary  (McNabb)  Macfarlane, 
the  former  a  native  of  Scotland  and  the  latter  of  Ontario.  Both  have  passed 
away.  Duncan  Macfarlane  came  to  Ontario  from  'Scotland,  settling  in  Renfrew 
county,  in  the  spring  of  1825,  under  the  late  Chief  McNabb.  There  the  remain- 
der of  his  life  was  spent.  He  was  a  prominent  lumberman  in  Ontario  for  many 
years  and  manufactured  the  first  lumber  that  was  ever  shipped  from  Canada  to 
the  Liverpool  market. 

John  W.  Macfarlane  obtained  his  education  in  the  graded  and  high  schools 
of  his  native  town  and  subsequently  learned  the  lumber  business  under  the 
direction  of  his  father,  cruising  and  operating  along  that  line  in  Ontario  until 
1905.  In  that  year  he  came  to  Vancouver,  British  Columbia,  and  embarked  in 
the  lumber  business  here,  having  since  accumulated  extensive  timber  holdings 
on  both  the  mainland  and  the  island.  He  is  engaged  in  buying,  selling  and  sur- 
veying all  kinds  of  timber  land  and  does  much  purchasing  for  investors,  having 
many  clients  in  the  States,  Eastern  Canada  and  London.  Mr.  Macfarlane  is 
likewise  the  president  of  the  Western  Steam  &  Oil  Plant  Company,  Limited,  a 
concern  organized  here  in  1910  for  the  purpose  of  selling  and  installing  oil 


JOHN  W.  MACFARLAXE 


BRITISH    COLUMBIA  109 

burning  plants  for  power  and  heating  purposes.  The  company  has  been  very 
successful,  having  placed  plants  in  many  new  and  modern  office  and  apartment 
buildings. 

On  the  3Oth  of  July,  1905,  at  North  Bay,  Ontario,  Mr.  Macfarlane  was  united 
in  marriage  to  Miss  Edith  Macfarlane,  of  Niagara  Falls,  Ontario.  They  now 
have  two  children,  Anna  Lorna  and  Robert  Walter.  Fraternally  Mr.  Macfarlane 
has  been  identified  with  the  Masons  for  more  than  twenty  years,  being  now  a 
member  of  Western  Gate  Lodge,  A.  F.  &  A.  M.  He  was  a  charter  member 
of  Sturgeon  Falls  Lodge,  No.  447.  His  religious  faith  is  indicated  by  his  mem- 
bership in  St.  John's  Presbyterian  church.  Attractive  social  qualities  render 
him  popular  and  he  has  an  extensive  circle  of  warm  friends  in  Vancouver. 


MURWIN    RICHARD   WORTH. 

Yet  a  young  man,  Murwin  Richard  Worth  has  already  made  his  mark  in 
commercial  life,  being  the  sole  owner  of  the  Western  Oil  &  Supply  Company, 
one  of  the  important  business  enterprises  of  Vancouver.  A  native  of  Ontario,  he 
was  born  at  Hampton,  in  the  township  of  Darlington,  Durham  county,  June  9, 
1880,  a  son  of  Richard  and  Mary  Jane  Worth,  the  former  of  whom  for  many 
years  engaged  in  the  hardware  business  at  Bowmanville,  Ontario. 

Murwin  Richard  Worth  acquired  a  public-school  education  in  his  native 
province,  spending  subsequently  six  years  in  the  hardware  establishment  of  his 
father.  In  the  spring  of  1900  he  came  to  Vancouver,  being  for  about  a  year  and 
a  half  employed  by  McClellan,  McFeely  &  Company,  wholesale  hardware  mer- 
chants. The  next  two  years  were  passed  in  the  employ  of  the  Cunningham 
Hardware  Company  as  traveling  salesman,  distributing  their  goods  throughout 
the  entire  province  of  British  Columbia.  Having  gained  valuable  experience 
in  the  retail  and  wholesale  end  of  the  business  and  the  manufacture  as  well  as 
disposal  of  the  goods,  he  felt  assured  of  success,  and  in  1904  started  out  in  a 
similar  line  under  the  name  of  the  Western  Oil  &  Supply  Company,  of  which  he  is 
sole  proprietor.  Since  its  inception  the  business  has  flourished  in  a  remarkable 
way,  its  trade  expanding  from  year  to  year  and  its  profits  growing  in  proportion. 

Aside  from  his  business  interests  Mr.  Worth  has  some  realty  investments. 
Fraternally  he  is  a  member  of  King  Solomon  Lodge,  A.  F.  &  A.  M.,  of  New 
Westminster,  and  N.  Clark  Wallace  Lodge,,  Loyal  Order  of  Orange,  of  Van- 
couver. His  club  relations  are  with  the  Terminal  City  and  Rotary  Clubs  of  this 
city.  A  young  man  of  aggressive  spirit,  thoroughly  modern  in  his  ideas  and, 
actuated  by  ambition  to  succeed,  he  has  already  established  himself  as  an 
important  member  of  the  commercial  fraternity  of  Vancouver,  and  there  exists 
no  speculation  as  to  his  future  success.  He  is  interested  in  all  that  concerns  his 
adopted  city  and  can  ever  be  found  in  the  ranks  of  those  who  have  at  heart  the 
commercial  expansion  of  the  city  and  its  moral  and  intellectual  upbuilding.  What 
he  has  achieved  is  commendable  and  his  career  is  proof  of  the  fact  that  close 
application  and  high  ambition,  supported  by  industry  and  energy,  eventually  reach 
the  goal. 


WILLIAM    HENRY   LEMBKE. 

William  Henry  Lembke  is  the  managing  director  of  the  Lembke  Investment 
Company,  Ltd.  He  has  occupied  this  position  since  its  inception  in  1912,  and  in 
shaping  the  policy  of  the  company  has  greatly  furthered  its  interests.  He  was 
born  March  22,  1869,  in  Grey  county,  Ontario,  a  son  of  William  and  Margaret 
Lembke.  The  family  name  indicates  their  German  origin.  In  the  public  schools 
of  his  native  place  William  Henry  Lembke  pursued  his  education  and  later 


110  BRITISH    COLUMBIA 

devoted  some  time  to  farming,  but  turned  from  agricultural  to  industrial  pursuits 
when  twenty  years  of  age,  going  into  the  building  trade.  After  four  years 
spent  in  the  employ  of  others  he  embarked  in  the  contracting  and  building 
business  on  his  own  account,  but  thinking  to  find  broader  and  better  opportunities 
on  the  Pacific  coast  he  left  the  east  in  1897  and  made  his  way  to  British  Columbia. 
After  his  arrival  in  this  section  of  the  country  he  followed  the  contracting  and 
building  business  in  Revelstoke  and  in  Rossland  for  two  years.  In  1899  he 
arrived  in  Vancouver,  where  he  again  became  connected  with  building  interests 
as  a  contractor,  thus  contributing  to  the  improvement  and  development  of  the 
city  until  1905.  His  work  has  since  been  equally  effective  in  promoting  Van- 
couver's interests,  for  in  the  intervening  period  of  eight  years  he  has  engaged  in 
the  real-estate,  insurance  and  loan  business.  In  1912  the  Lembke  Investment 
Company,  Ltd.,  was  formed,  of  which  he  was  the  promoter.  His  long  previous 
experience  as  a  contractor  and  builder  made  him  largely  acquainted  with  property 
interests  and  values  in  Vancouver  and  served  as  the  foundation  upon  which  he 
has  builded  his  later  success  as  a  real-estate  dealer.  He  has  now  secured  a  good 
clientage  in  that  department  and  in  insurance  and  loan  circles,  and  his  business 
is  reaching  broadening  and  substantial  proportions,  bringing  to  him  satisfactory 
financial  returns. 

On  the  3d  of  September,  1906,  in  Seattle,  Washington,  Mr.  Lembke  was 
married  to  Mrs.  Mary  Ellen  Hurst,  nee  Senior,  a  daughter  of  John  and  Elizabeth 
Senior,  representatives  of  an  old  family  in  Manchester,  England.  Mr.  Lembke 
has  a  step-son,  Ewart  Macleod  Hurst.  Mr.  Lembke's  religious  faith  is  that  of  the 
Lutheran  church.  His  fraternal  relations  are  with  Vancouver  Lodge,  I.  O.  O.  F. 
In  politics  he  is  a  conservative  and  is  now  a  councilor  of  the  municipality  of 
Point  Grey,  British  Columbia.  He  takes  an  active  interest  in  all  measures  and 
movements  pertaining  to  the  general  welfare,  and  along  business  lines  and  in 
citizenship  has  contributed  to  the  work  of  upbuilding  and  improvement. 


NELS  NELSON. 

Nels  Nelson,  proprietor  of  the  Westminster  Brewery,  of  New  Westminster, 
is  justly  ranked  with  the  successful  business  men  who  owe  their  prosperity  to 
enterprise,  keen  business  discernment,  determined  effort  and  indefatigable  industry. 
He  was  born  in  Denmark  on  the  nth  of  August,  1863,  and  was  reared  in  his 
native  country,  the  common  schools  affording  him  his  educational  privileges. 
When  fourteen  years  of  age  he  went  to  sea  and  through  the  succeeding  four 
years  followed  a  seafaring  life.  In  1881  he  had  become  an  able  seaman  on  board 
of  a  German  vessel  which  sailed  from  Hamburg  to  Baltimore  and  thence  around 
the  Horn  to  the  west  coast  of  Mexico,  and  from  that  point  on  to  Victoria,  at 
which  place  Mr.  Nelson  left  the  ship,  having  determined  to  try  his  fortune  in 
British  Columbia.  Through  the  succeeding  four  years  he  was  employed  in  the 
old  Victoria  brewery,  in  which  he  learned  the  science  of  brewing  beer,  becoming 
familiar  with  every  process  and  gaining  notable  skill  in  that  connection.  He 
afterward  went  to  Nanaimo,  where  he  spent  a  few  months  in  a  brewery,  and  in 
1886  came  to  New  Westminster,  where  he  entered  the  old  City  Brewery  as 
brewmaster,  in  which  capacity  he  served  for  nine  years.  In  1895  he  purchased 
the  Westminster  Brewery  and  a  year  later  bought  the  old  City  Brewery,  in 
which  he  had  spent  almost  a  decade  as  brewmaster.  After  the  purchase  of  the 
latter  plant  the  two  were  merged  into  one  under  the  name  of  the  Westminster 
Brewery.  Still  extending  his  business,  Mr.  Nelson,  in  1897,  purchased  his  plant  in 
Brunette  and  has  since  conducted  business  there.  His  interests  are  now  extensive 
and  of  an  important  character.  The  product  of  his  brewery  is  shipped  widely  over 
the  northwest,  the  excellence  of  its  product  being  acknowledged  by  all  who  are 
competent  judges  in  that  regard.  His  trade  having  assumed  extensive  proportions, 


NELS  NELSON 


BRITISH    COLUMBIA  113 

the  business  is  a  very  profitable '  one  and  Mr.  Nelson  well  deserves  the  success 
which  has  come  to  him. 

In  1889  Mr.  Nelson  was  united  in  marriage  to  Miss  Annette  Sorenson,  a 
native  of  Denmark,  and  by  this  marriage  six  children  have  been  born,  of  whom 
five  are  yet  living:  Lena  C,  at  home;  Lawry,  an  engineer,  of  New  Westminster; 
Edna  C.,  Violet  A.  and  Frieda,  all  at  home. 

In  politics  Mr.  Nelson  is  a  conservative  and  in  political  questions  and  activities 
takes  a  deep  and  helpful  interest,  being  now  president  of  the  Conservative  Asso- 
ciation of  New  Westminster.  He  is  well  informed  on  all  questions  and  issues  of 
the  day  and  his  position  is  that  of  a  progressive  citizen  who  has  the  welfare  of 
city,  province  and  country  at  heart. 

Mr.  Nelson  belongs  to  King  Solomon  Lodge,  No.  17,  A.  F.  &  A.  M.,  of  which 
he  is  a  past  master.  He  is  also  a  member  of  Westminster  Chapter,  No.  124, 
R.  A.  M.,  in  which  he  is  a  past  principal.  He  likewise  belongs  to  Westminster 
Commandery,  No.  56,  K.  T.,  to  Gizeh  Temple,  A.  A.  O.  N.  M.  S.,  of  Victoria. 
Aside  from  Masonry  he  has  membership  in  Royal  Lodge,  No.  6,  K.  P.,  and  was 
one  of  its  founders  in  1886.  He  is  a  member  of  the  Westminster  Progressive 
Association  and  of  the  Board  of  Trade,  and  heartily  cooperates  in  all  movements 
and  measures  put  forth  by  those  organizations  for  the  benefit  and  upbuilding  of 
the  city  in  which  he  makes  his  home.  He  is  public-spirited  in  all  that  he  does 
and  his  labors  have  been  an  effective  force  for  public  progress.  He  is  vice 
president  of  the  Royal  Agricultural  and  Industrial  Society  of  New  Westminster, 
and  he  takes  a  deep  interest  in  agricultural  affairs,  owning  a  farm  of  three 
hundred  acres  on  Lulu  island,  which  he  operated  for  five  years  himself,  during 
which  period  he  brought  the  place  under  a  high  state  of  productiveness.  The 
Nelson  family  are  members  of  the  Church  of  England  and  Mr.  Nelson  is  a 
most  generous  man.  No  good  work  done  in  the  name  of  charity  or  religion  seeks 
his  aid  in  vain,  and  yet  there  is  no  man  more  unostentatious  in  his  giving.  The 
poor  and  needy  ever  find  in  him  a  friend,  and  there  are  many  occasions  on  which 
not  even  the  recipient  knows  the  identity  of  his  benefactor  until  he  accidentally 
discovers  it.  Mr.  Nelson  finds  his  recreation  largely  in  lacrosse  and  has  served 
as  president  of  the  British  Columbia  Lacrosse  Association  and  of  the  New 
Westminster  Lacrosse  Association  while  the  teams  were  in  the  amateur  class. 
He  is  now  building  one  of  the  finest  homes  in  New  Westminster  and  is  most 
devoted  to  his  family,  doing  everything  in  his  power  to  promote  their  welfare 
and  happiness.  He  is  unassuming  and  democratic  in  manner,  but  his  intellectual 
force  and  personal  worth  are  recognized  by  all  with  whom  he  comes  in  contact. 


S 


HENRY   LOVEKIN   EDMONDS. 

The  life  history  of  Henry  Lovekin  Edmonds  stands  in  contradistinction  to  the 
Id  adage  that  a  prophet  is  never  without  honor  save  in  his  own  country,  for  in 
e  city  of  his  nativity  he  has  attained  distinction  and  has  won  recognition  for  his 
ability  as  a  member  of  the  bar.     He  is  now  serving  as  police  magistrate  in  New 
Westminster,  to  which  office  he  was  called  in  May,  1910.     He  was  born  in  New 
estminster,  November  2,  1870,  a  son  of  Henry  Valentine  and  Jane  Fortune 
Kemp)  Edmonds,  both  of  whom  were  natives  of  Ireland,  the  former  born  in 
Dublin  and  the  latter  in  Cork.     The  son  pursued  his  education  in  the  public 
hools  of  New  Westminster  and  of  Victoria,  and  after  completing  his  more 
;cifically  literary  education  entered  upon  the  study  of  law  and  prepared  for 
e  bar,  to  which  he  was  called  in  1894.     His  record  as  a  practitioner  has  been 
aracterized   by   continuous   progress   as   experience   and    further   study   have 
rought  him  power  and  developed  his  latent  talents.     He  has  been  accorded  a 
good  law  practice  and  is  now  making  a  creditable  record  as  police  magistrate, 
which  office  he  has  filled  for  more  than  three  years.     His  standing  among  his 
rofessional  brethren  is  indicated  by  the  fact  that  he  is  honorary  secretary  of 


114  BRITISH    COLUMBIA 

the  New  Westminster  Bar  Association,  which  position  he  has  held  for  about 
twelve  years.  In  addition  to  professional  interests  Mr.  Edmonds  is  known  in 
business  circles  as  one  of  the  directors  and  the  secretary  of  the  Quesnelle  Lake 
Timber  Company,  Ltd.,  a  director  of  the  Fraser  River  Tannery,  Ltd.,  and  a 
director  of  the  Edmonds  Development  Company,  Ltd.  All  of  these  are  factors 
in  that  general  development  and  upbuilding  of  the  country  which  has  its  root  in 
business  activity  and  the  utilization  of  natural  resources. 

Mr.  Edmonds  also  figures  prominently  in  political  circles.  Since  age  con- 
ferred upon  him  the  right  of  franchise  he  has  given  stalwart  support  to  the 
conservative  party,  and  that  he  is  one  of  the  leaders  in  its  ranks  is  indicated 
by  the  fact  that  he  served  as  president  of  the  New  Westminster  Conservative 
Association  from  1910  until  1912,  inclusive,  and  is  now  president  of  the  New 
Westminster  District  Conservative  Association  and  the  third  vice  president  of 
the  British  Columbia  Conservative  Association. 

On  the  1 5th  of  July,  1908,  in  New  Westminster  Mr.  Edmonds  was  united  in 
marriage  to  Miss  Ella  Kate  Pringle,  a  daughter  of  M.  Pringle.  They  hold 
membership  in  the  Church  of  England,  and  Mr.  Edmonds  is  well  known  in 
fraternal  and  club  circles,  being  identified  with  King  Solomon  Lodge,  No.  17, 
A.  F.  &  A.  M.,  of  New  Westminster;  the  Canadian  Order  of  Woodmen  of  the 
World;  the  Hoo  Hoos;  the  native  sons  of  British  Columbia;  the  Westminster 
Club;  the  Burnaby  Country  Club,  and  the  British  Columbia  Golf  Club.  His 
activities  are  varied,  maintaining  an  even  balance  in  his  life  and  making  him 
one  of  the  forceful  and  honored  factors  in  the  community. 


WALTER  R.  GILLEY. 

Walter  R.  Gilley  has  become  widely  known  as  a  leader  in  many  public  enter- 
prises. He  has  done  much  to  shape  general  thought  and  action  and  his  influence 
has  ever  been  on  the  side  of  improvement  in  matters  of  citizenship  as  well  as 
in  the  material  development  of  New  Westminster.  He  was  born  October  22, 
1859,  at  St.  Andrews,  New  Brunswick,  and  of  that  province  his  parents,  Walter 
and  Sarah  (Rogers)  Gilley,  were  also  natives.  The  father  was  a  school  teacher 
for  many  years.  He  came  to  British  Columbia  in  1888,  remaining  thereafter  a 
resident  of  this  province  until  his  death,  which  occurred  in  1903,  when  he  had 
reached  the  advanced  age  of  eighty-four  years. 

Walter  R.  Gilley  was  educated  in  the  country  schools  of  New  Brunswick, 
which  he  attended  to  the  age  of  fifteen  years.  He  then  put  aside  his  school  books 
in  order  to  start  out  in  life  on  his  own  account  and  secured  a  clerkship  in  the 
postoffice  at  St.  Stephens.  In  October,  1877,  at  the  age  of  eighteen  years,  he 
arrived  in  British  Columbia  and  for  a  considerable  period  was  prominently 
identified  with  the  lumber  industry.  He  was  first  employed  in  the  lumber 
woods  bordering  the  Fraser  river,  spending  a  part  of  the  time  in  driving  a  six- 
yoke  team  of  oxen,  for  in  those  days  such  means  were  the  only  methods  of 
getting  the  timber  to  high  water  where  shipment  could  be  made.  After  five 
years  of  logging  Mr.  Gilley  formed  a  partnership  with  his  brother  James  R. 
at  Port  Haney  and  began  hauling  sand  and  wood.  This  business  was  continued 
until  1886,  when  they  engaged  in  logging  on  the  Fraser  river.  In  the  following 
year  they  established  a  livery  and  transfer  business  at  New  Westminster  which 
they  conducted  until  1893.  The  following  year  they  resumed  their  logging  inter- 
ests and  during  their  operation  in  that  field  of  business  they  cut  some  of  the 
largest  timber  in  British  Columbia,  some  of  the  trees  measuring  three  hundred  feet 
in  length,  while  one  giant  trunk  which  they  took  to  tide  water  was  ninety  feet  long, 
fifty-eight  inches  in  diameter  at  the  small  end  and  seven  feet  at  the  butt.  In 
1898,  the  year  of  the  big  fire  in  New  Westminster,  the  Gilley  brothers  retired 
from  the  logging  business  and  began  dealing  in  coal,  wood,  cement  and  building 
supplies.  The  undertaking  prospered  from  the  beginning.  They  supplied  the 


WALTEK  R.  GILLEY 


BRITISH    COLUMBIA  117 

crushed  rock  for  the  northwest  bridge  spanning  the  Eraser  river  and  known  as 
one  of  the  finest  structures  of  its  kind  in  Canada.  They  own  and  operate  exten- 
sive quarries  on  the  Pitt  river  and  their  annual  business  is  now  one  of  extensive 
proportions  and  returns  to  them  a  gratifying  yearly  income. 

It  has  been  the  privilege  of  Mr.  Gilley  to  witness  many  changes  and  improve- 
ments in  New  Westminster  and  this  part  of  the  country,  which  was  compara- 
tively a  wilderness  when  he  entered  upon  his  business  activities  in  this  section 
of  the  country.  His  labors  have  been  a  factor  in  the  work  of  general  business 
development  and  he  is  widely  recognized  as  a  forceful  and  resourceful  man, 
ready  to  meet  any  emergency  with  the  consciousness  that  comes  of  a  right 
conception  of  things  and  an  habitual  regard  for  what  is  best  in  the  exercise  of 
human  activities. 

In  1888  Mr.  Gilley  was  united  in  marriage  to  Miss  Salina  F.  Hinch,  a  native 
of  Ontario  and  a  daughter  of  John  Hinch,  who  was  one  of  the  old  settlers  of 
Port  Haney,  where  he  took  up  his  abode  in  1875.  Eight  children  were  born  unto 
Mr.  and  Mrs.  Gilley  and  in  social  circles  of  New  Westminster  the  family  has 
long  been  prominent. 

Fraternally  Mr.  Gilley  is  connected  with  the  Independent  Order  of  Odd 
Fellows,  and  he  is  an  active  member  of  the  New  Westminster  Board  of  Trade, 
being  president  for  one  year.  Public-spirited  and  progressive  to  an  eminent 
degree,  he  has  taken  a  very  active  interest  in  making  the  Fraser  river  easy  of 
access  both  day  and  night,  believing  that  the  future  prosperity  of  New  West- 
minster depends  to  a  great  extent  upon  making  this  river  sufficiently  deep  to 
accommodate  the  largest  ocean-going  vessels.  He  has  been  a  member  of  the 
navigation  committee  and  served  as  its  chairman  for  several  years.  Through 
his  efforts  the  Board  of  Trade  secured  the  services  of  a  harbor  engineer  of  great 
experience,  and  the  plans  he  submitted  were  later  adopted  by  the  government. 
Mr.  Gilley  believes  that  when  all  the  work  planned  is  finished  New  Westminster 
will  have  beyond  doubt  the  finest  harbor  in  British  Columbia.  In  politics  he  is 
a  conservative.  In  1899  and  1900  he  was  city  alderman  and  during  that  time 
was  chairman  of  the  board  of  public  works.  He  stands  for  all  that  is  best  in 
citizenship  as  well  as  in  business  life,  and  while  in  public  office  his  efforts  were 
an  effective  force  for  the  municipal  welfare.  He  is  a  self-made  man  who  by 
his  own  labors  has  risen  from  a  comparatively  obscure  position  in  the  business 
world  to  one  of  prominence.  He  never  fails  to  accomplish  what  he  undertakes 
if  it  can  be  done  by  persistent,  earnest  effort,  and  the  laudable  ambition  that 
has  actuated  him  through  all  the  successive  steps  of  his  business  career  has 
brought  him  to  an  enviable  position. 


WILLIAM   LEWIS   KEATE. 

One  who  studies  the  timber  industry  will  note  that  activities  along  this  line 
have  gradually  moved  westward  until  one  of  the  most  important  centers  of  the 
trade  is  to  be  found  in  British  Columbia.  Among  those  prominently  representing 
business  of  this  character  is  William  Lewis  Keate,  of  Vancouver,  now  actively 
and  successfully  engaged  in  dealing  in  timber  lands.  He  was  born  in  Grand 
Rapids,  Michigan,  March  20,  1876,  a  son  of  Edward  Jefferson  and  Eliza  Scott 
(Peoples)  Keate,  who  were  pioneer  people  of  Michigan,  while  the  father,  English 
born,  was  a  native  of  London.  The  son  pursued  his  education  in  the  public 
schools  of  his  native  city  and  being  reared  in  the  center  of  an  important  lumber 
district,  acquired  in  a  casual  way  not  a  little  knowledge  of  the  trade  at  that  time, 
although  on  leaving  school  he  did  not  become  connected  with  that  line  of  activity. 
He  entered  the  employ  of  R.  G.  Dun  &  Company,  with  whom  he  remained  for 
ten  years  as  assistant  manager  in  Grand  Rapids,  Michigan,  and  later  at  Detroit. 
In  1905  he  accepted  the  management  of  the  Kalamazoo  (Mich.)  branch  of  the 
firm  and  remained  there  for  two  years.  On  the  expiration  of  that  period  he 


118  BRITISH    COLUMBIA 

came  to  Vancouver,  where  he  has  since  engaged  in  the  timber  business  on  his 
own  account  and  also  represents  eastern  capital  in  the  placing  of  investments. 
He  has  been  successful  since  coming  to  the  coast  and  his  energy  and  ability  prom- 
ise well  for  the  future.  He  has  conducted  important  negotiations  in  timber  lands 
and  within  the  period  of  his  residence  here  has  gained  comprehensive  knowledge 
of  values  and  knows  thoroughly  of  the  leading  timber  tracts  of  this  section  of 
the  country. 

On  the  3d  of  June,  1907,  at  Grand  Rapids,  Michigan,  Mr.  Keate  was  married 
to  Miss  Ethel  M.  Anderson,  a  daughter  of  Frederick  Anderson,  and  their  chil- 
dren are  William  Lewis  and  Robert  Jefferson  Keate.  Mr.  Keate  took  out  citi- 
zenship papers  in  Canada  in  1911,  but  is  not  active  in  political  circles.  He 
belongs  to  St.  Mark's  Episcopal  church  and  is  a  member  of  the  Terminal  City, 
the  British  Columbia  Golf  and  the  Rotary  Clubs.  He  has  become  popular  in 
these  organizations  and  has  gained  a  circle  of  friends  that  is  constantly  broaden- 
ing as  the  circle  of  his  acquaintance  widens. 


FRANCIS  BOWSER. 

In  1907  Francis  Bowser  moved  from  Vancouver  into  the  suburb  of  Kerrisdale 
and,  in  the  midst  of  what  was  then  practically  a  virgin  forest,  built  a  magnificent 
home.  It  is  surrounded  by  a  wide  and  level  lawn  beautified  with  flowers  and 
trees  and  the  place  constitutes  one  of  the  most  attractive  residences  in  the  beauti- 
ful suburb  which  has  grown  up  around  it.  All  of  these  things  represent  the  fruits 
of  a  long,  active  and  honorable  career,  closely  identified  with  business  and  public 
interests  of  Vancouver,  where  Mr.  Bowser  has  resided  since  1888  and  where  he 
has  become  known  as  a  moving  force  in  everything  relating  to  the  city's  political, 
social  and  material  advancement.  Although  he  is  living  retired  he  is  still  active 
in  community  affairs  and  his  wealth  and  influence  are  always  used  in  behalf  of 
public  progress. 

Mr.  Bowser  was  born  in  Kingston,  now  Rexton,  New  Brunswick,  September 
13,  1858,  and  is  a  son  of  William  and  Margaret  (Gordon)  Bowser,  the  former 
a  son  of  John  Bowser,  a  native  of  England,  who  emigrated  to  New  Brunswick 
and  there  became  very  prominent,  serving  as  a  judge  for  number  of  years.  His 
son,  William  Bowser,  was  born  in  New  Brunswick  and  after  reaching  manhood 
engaged  in  mercantile  pursuits  at  Kingston.  He  married  Miss  Margaret  Gordon, 
of  Scotch  lineage,  and  they  became  the  parents  of  eight  children,  two  of  whom 
are  now  residents  of  British  Columbia.  These  are:  Francis,  the  subject  of  this 
review ;  and  William  J.,  LL.  B.,  K.  C.,  who  is  serving  as  attorney  general  of  the 
province.  A  more  extended  mention  of  his  career  will  be  found  elsewhere  in 
this  work. 

Francis  Bowser  acquired  his  education  in  the  public  schools  of  his  native  prov- 
ince and  as  a  boy  of  seventeen  went  to  sea,  sailing  out  of  Liverpool,  England,  for 
about  five  years  thereafter.  Concluding,  however,  that  a  seafaring  life  offered 
him  no  opportunity  for  advancement,  he  went  to  the  United  States  in  1880  and 
was  variously  employed  in  Bay  City,  Michigan,  Milwaukee,  Wisconsin,  and  other 
cities  until  1881,  when  he  moved  to  Canada,  settling  in  Brandon,  Manitoba.  After 
one  year  he  moved  to  Moose  Jaw,  Saskatchewan,  and  there  turned  his  attention 
to  the  general  merchandise  business,  Moose  Jaw  being  at  that  time  the  western 
terminal  of  the  Canadian  Pacific  Railroad.  As  the  road  pushed  farther  west 
business  conditions  there  became  less  favorable  and  Mr.  Bowser  disposed  of  his 
mercantile  enterprise  and  in  the  summer  of  1883  came  to  British  Columbia, 
settling  in  Victoria  and  becoming  engaged  on  the  construction  work  of  the 
Canadian  Pacific  Railroad  in  the  Yale  district.  -For  some  'time  afterward  he 
held  this  position  and  then  entered  the  freight  department  of  construction,  having 
his  offices  at  Port  Hammond,  British  Columbia.  There  he  remained  until  1885, 
when  the  work  called  for  by  the  Onderdonk  contracts  was  completed.  This 


BRITISH    COLUMBIA  121 

consisted  of  the  laying  of  one  hundred  and  twenty-eight  miles  of  track  on  the 
main  line  from  Emory's  Bar  to  Savona  and  when  it  was  finished  Mr.  Bowser 
returned  to  Victoria,  where  he  was  employed  by  the  Canadian  Pacific  Navigation 
Company  for  some  time.  In  1888  he  came  to  what  is  now  Vancouver  and  is  num- 
bered therefore  among  the  early  arrivals  in  the  city.  He  entered  the  Dominion 
customs  services  as  clerk  in  the  office  of  the  landing  waiter  and  in  1889  became 
chief  landing  waiter,  holding  that  position  until  1908,  a  period  of  about  twenty 
years,  during  which  his  capable,  prompt  and  conscientious  performance  of  his 
duties  won  him  general  recognition  as  a  public-spirited  official  and  a  far-sighted  and 
resourceful  business  man.  During  all  of  his  time  Mr.  Bowser  made  various 
investments  in  Vancouver  property  and  acquired  extensive  and  valuable  real- 
estate  interests,  winning  a  comfortable  competency  upon  which  he  retired  from 
active  life  in  1908.  Some  time  before  he  had  removed  from  Vancouver  to  Kerris- 
dale,  Point  Grey,  and  here  acquired  a  large  acreage  upon  which  he  built  a  home. 
At  this  time  the  region  was  practically  virgin  forest  and  the  magnificence  of  his 
residence  seemed  out  of  place  in  these  primitive  surroundings  but  there  gradually 
grew  up  around  it  other  homes  and  Kerrisdale  justified  his  faith  in  its  future  by 
becoming  a  most  beautiful  suburb. 

On  the  8th  of  August,  1885,  Mr.  Bowser  was  united  in  marriage  to  Miss  Julia 
Jessie  Sinclair,  a  daughter  of  William  Sinclair,  a  retired  Hudson's  Bay  Company 
official,  of  whom  further  mention  is  made  elsewhere  in  this  work.  Mr.  and 
Mrs.  Bowser  have  five  children,  Frances  Maud,  William  James,  Margaret  Kitt- 
son,  Janet  Baxter  and  Frank  Copely. 

In  the  quarter  of  a  century  during  which  Mr.  Bowser  has  lived  in  Vancouver 
no  movement  of  a  progressive  public  nature  has  been  formulated  which  has  not 
•eceived  his  hearty  indorsement  and  enthusiastic  support.  Essentially  public- 
.pirited  and  progressive,  he  is  prominent  in  all  matters  pertaining  to  growth  and 
advancement  and  was  active  in  formation  of  the  municipality  of  Point  Grey  in 
1908.  serving  as  reeve  from  1910  to  1911.  He  is  at  present  a  member  of  the  Bur- 
rard  Peninsular  Sewerage  Commission  and  chairman  of  the  board.  He  is  a  thirty- 
second  degree  Mason,  a  member  of  Acacia  Lodge,  No.  22,  A.  F.  &  A.  M.,  and 
has  held  all  the  chairs  and  is  past  grand  master  of  the  jurisdiction  for  British 
Columbia.  He  was  a  moving  spirit  in  the  building  of  the  Masonic  Temple  in 
Vancouver  and  is  now  a  director  and  treasurer  of  the  Vancouver  Masonic  Temple 
Building  Company.  He  attends  the  Presbyterian  church  of  Kerrisdale,  to  which 
he  gave  two  lots  upon  which  the  church  edifice  is  built,  and  he  is  a  regular 
attendant  at  divine  service.  He  has  seen  Vancouver  develop  from  a  small  town 
to  its  present  prosperous  condition  and  has  been  a  factor  in  the  work  of  its 
progress.  A  man  of  exemplary  character,  he  holds  the  respect  and  confidence 
of  all  who  know  him  and,  having  won  for  himself  an  honorable  position  in  busi- 
ness, social  and  political  circles,  is  now  enjoying  the  rest  and  retirement  which 
rewards  earnest  and  well  directed  labor. 


I 


FREDERICK  L.   DAVIS. 

Frederick  L.  Davis,  one  of  the  recent  acquisitions  to  the  legal  fraternity  of 
Vancouver,  having  removed  here  from  Neepawa,  Manitoba,  in  1913,  is  a  native 
of  Hastings  county,  Ontario,  where  his  family  have  resided  for  four  generations. 
He  was  born  at  Belleville  on  the  6th  of  August,  1867,  his  parents  being  James 
Ashley  and  Sarah  (Way)  Davis.  They  are  natives  of  Ontario,  the  father 
having  been  born  at  Pictou  and  the  mother  at  Ameliasburg.  James  A.  Davis 
removed  with  his  family  to  Manitoba  in  1881,  where  he  has  ever  since  resided 
and  is  now  living  retired  in  Winnipeg  at  54  Frances  street.  He  has  attained  the 
advanced  age  of  seventy-seven  years,  while  the  mother  is  seventy-six.  They  have 
been  married  fifty  years  and  have  been  the  parents  of  three  sons,  of  whom  our 
subject  is  the  eldest  and  the  only  one  living.  Mrs.  Davis  is  a  daughter  of  John 


122  BRITISH    COLUMBIA 

Way,  who  married  a  Miss  Casey,  of  United  Empire  Loyalist  stock,  and  they 
became  the  parents  of  a  large  family. 

Frederick  L.  Davis,  whose  name  introduces  this  record,  was  reared  at  home 
and  received  his  elementary  education  in  the  schools  of  Belleville,  and  there  took 
his  first  year's  work  in  collegiate  institute.  He  accompanied  his  parents  on  their 
removal  to  Winnipeg  in  1881,  and  there  continued  his  education,  being  gradu- 
ated from  collegiate  institute  in  May,  1884.  In  1887  he  was  awarded  his  degree 
in  arts,  following  which  he  took  a  Normal  course,  in  order  to  qualify  himself 
for  the  profession  of  teaching.  He  followed  this  vocation  for  two  years,  at 
the  expiration  of  which  time  he  took  up  the  study  of  law,  being  granted  his 
enrollment  in  1893.  He  went  to  Neepawa,  where  he  followed  his  profession  for 
about  nineteen  years  until  he  came  to  Vancouver.  In  1900  he  was  admitted  to  the 
bar,  and  at  Neepawa  succeeded  in  building  up  a  large  and  in  every  way  desirable 
clientage.  He  gave  up  his  practice  there  in  1913  and  came  to  Vancouver,  where 
he  has  permanently  located. 

In  May,  1895,  Mr.  Davis  was  married  to  Miss  Nellie  Webster,  who  had  been 
a  resident  of  Winnipeg  since  1881,  and  was  for  many  years  prominent  in 
musical  circles  there.  Of  this  marriage  have  been  born  three  children,  Marjory, 
Webster  and  Elizabeth,  the  latter  dying  at  the  age  of  six  years  in  1908. 

Mr.  Davis  is  a  strong  supporter  of  the  liberal  party  and  takes  an  active 
interest  in  all  political  affairs,  as  did  his  father  before  him,  although  the  latter 
never  sought  public  office.  In  1910  Mr.  Davis  was  a  nominee  for  the  provincial 
legislature,  but  his  name  was  cast  out  on  a  technicality,  his  agent  having  had  the 
papers  sworn  to  before  a  police  magistrate  instead  of  a  justice  of  the  peace,  as 
the  law  requires.  Fraternally  he  is  a  Mason  and  Odd  Fellow.  His  residence  in 
Vancouver  has  been  of  very  brief  duration,  but  he  has  made  an  excellent  begin- 
ning and  has  every  reason  to  feel  gratified  with  the  success  which  has  thus  far 
attended  his  efforts. 


REV.  THOMAS  DA  VIES  PEARSON. 

The  Methodist  ministry  long  numbered  Rev.  Thomas  Davies  Pearson  among 
its  able  divines  and  his  life  was  fruitful  in  good  accomplished  for  the  moral' 
uplift  of  the  race.  Ever  kindly  in  spirit  and  charitable  in  his  judgment,  while 
never  deviating  in  the  slightest  degree  from  what  he  believed  to  be  right,  he 
won  the  love  and  trust  of  his  fellowmen  and  his  death,  even  though  it  came 
when  he  had  attained  a  venerable  age,  was  deeply  regretted  by  all  who  knew  him. 

He  was  born  on  June  17,  1828,  in  the  Forest  of  Dean,  Gloucester,  England, 
and  passed  away  in  New  Westminster  on  the  I3th  of  September,  1911,  at  the 
age  of  eighty-three  years.  His  father  was  a  minister  of  the  Wesleyan  Methodist 
church,  and,  reared  in  a  Christian  atmosphere,  the  son  became  a  local  preacher 
at  the  age  of  nineteen.  He  was  a  young  man  of  twenty-three  years  when,  in 
1851,  he  came  to  Canada  with  Egerton  Ryerson.  In  1852  he  became  a  candidate 
for  the  ministry  of  the  Wesleyan  Methodist  conference,  was  received  on  trial 
the  following  year  and  in  1856  was  received  into  full  connection  and  ordained. 
In  accordance  with  the  custom  of  the  country  the  Rev.  Pearson  lived  at  various 
places,  preaching  the  gospel  and  working  untiringly  for  the  moral  uplift  and 
progress  of  the  community.  He  devoted  thirty-one  years  of  his  life  to  Christian 
preaching  and  service  and  then  was  superannuated  in  1883. 

The  year  1891  witnessed  the  arrival  of  Mr.  Pearson  in  British  Columbia, 
at  which  time  he  took  up  his  abode  in  New  Westminster.  He  had  been  married 
on  the  1 7th  of  June,  1856,  to  Miss  Isabella  Robson,  a  daughter  of  John  and 
Euphemia  Robson,  the  former  a  farmer  and  mill  owner  and  the  first  jailer 
at  Sarnia,  Ontario.  She  is  also  a  sister  of  the  Rev.  Ebenezer  Robson,  a  pioneer 
Methodist  minister  of  British  Columbia,  and  also  of  David  and  John  Robson, 
who  likewise  took  an  important  part  in  the  development  of  the  far  west.  Mr. 


REV.  THOMAS  D.  PEARSON 


BRITISH    COLUMBIA  125 

and  Mrs.  Pearson  became  the  parents  of  two  sons  and  three  daughters.  One 
son,  Thomas  R.  Pearson,  manager  of  the  Dominion  Trust  Company,  Ltd.,  of 
New  Westminster,  has  been  choir  leader  of  the  Methodist  church  for  thirty 
years,  and  is  one  of  the  best  known  laymen  in  British  Columbia.  A  daughter, 
Euphemia  Isabella,  is  the  wife  of  the  Rev.  D.  R.  McKenzie,  of  Japan.  The 
others  are :  Mrs.  Harvey  Johnson,  of  New  Westminster ;  Sadie  Amelia,  the 
wife  of  George  H.  Grant,  of  Vancouver,  and  Frank  Raymond,  of  New  West- 
minster. 

While  conditions  forced  Mr.  Pearson's  retirement  from  the  active  work  of 
the  ministry,  he  never  ceased  to  feel  deeply  interested  in  the  work  of  the 
church  and  cooperated  therein  as  his  health  would  permit.  He  was  a  well 
known  figure  at  conference  gatherings,  although  he  took  little  active  part  in  the 
proceedings.  He  was  an  interested  observer  of  all  good  works  and  had  a  high 
sense  of  the  sacredness  of  the  office  of  the  minister.  He  never  failed  to  attend 
church  services  if  it  were  possible  to  do  so,  and  he  was  much  loved  and  honored 
among  the  membership  at  Queen's  Avenue  church  in  New  Westminster,  his 
example  serving  as  a  source  of  encouragement  and  inspiration  to  others.  He 
was,  moreover,  always  a  most  sympathetic  listener  and  was  among  the  first  to 
extend  a  helping  hand  to  his  pastor  or  to  anyone  who  was  seeking  to  climb 
the  upward  path.  In  1902,  on  the  occasion  of  his  jubilee  as  a  Methodist  preacher, 
the  British  Columbia  conference  passed  a  suitable  resolution  recognizing  his 
worth  and  work  and  requesting  him  to  preach  a  sermon,  but  he  was  unable  to 
do  so.  The  venerable  figure  of  the  Rev.  Pearson  was  well  known  on  the 
streets  of  New  Westminster,  where  he  lived  for  twenty  years,  passing  away  on 
the  I3th  of  September,  1911.  His  last  illness  was  only  of  two  days'  duration 
and  then  the  end  came.  He  left  to  his  family  the  priceless  heritage  of  a  noble 
name  and  the  memory  of  a  life  fraught  with  good  deeds  and  actuated  by  high 
purposes.  His  words  of  wisdom  sank  deep  into  many  hearts  and  his  counsel 
was  often  sought  by  young  and  old,  rich  and  poor. 


JOSEPH  EDWARD  BIRD. 

Prominent  in  the  legal  profession  of  Vancouver  stands  the  firm  of  MacNeill, 
Bird,  MacDonald  &  Darling,  general  practitioners  whose  ability  is  attested  by  the 
extensive  clientage  accorded  them.  The  second  member  of  the  firm,  Joseph 
Edward  Bird,  was  born  July  16,  1868,  at  Barrie.  Ontario,  a  son  of  Henry  and 
Elizabeth  Bird.  The  father  was  a  prominent  and  influential  citizen  of  his 
locality,  serving  for  forty  years  as  clerk  and  treasurer  of  the  municipality  of 
Barrie. 

Liberal  educational  opportunities  were  accorded  the  son,  who  attended  the 
Barrie  Collegiate  Institute  and  also  the  Toronto  University  at  Toronto.  His 
choice  of  a  profession  falling  upon  the  law,  he  was  articled  in  Barrie,  Ontario, 
to  H.  H.  Strathy,  K.  C,  and  after  thorough  preparatory  reading  was  called  to  the 
Ontario  bar  in  1893.  The  same  year  he  commenced  practice  in  Toronto  asso- 
ciated with  Edgar  &  Malone  and  later,  in  1896,  they  opened  a  branch  office  at 
Rat  Portage,  Ontario.  Mr.  Bird  continued  a  practitioner  in  the  east  until  1902, 
when  he  came  to  Vancouver  and  entered  upon  the  active  work  of  his  profession 
in  this  city  as  a  partner  in  the  firm  of  Bird,  Brydon  Jack  &  McCrossan.  That 
connection  was  continued  until  1907,  when  the  partnership  was  dissolved,  after 
which  Mr.  Bird  practiced  until  1912  as  junior  partner  in  the  firm  of  MacNeill 
&  Bird.  In  the  latter  year  they  were  joined  by  two  others  under  the  firm  style  of 
MacNeill,  Bird,  MacDonald  &  Darling.  They  continue  in  general  practice  but 
have  considerable  railway  work,  being  solicitors  for  the  Great  Northern  Railway 
Company.  They  are  also  legal  representatives  of  the  Bank  of  Nova  Scotia  and 
Bank  of  Toronto.  Their  practice  is  today  extensive  and  of  an  important  char- 
acter. Aside  from  his  practice  Mr.  Bird  has  business  interests,  being  a  director 


126  BRITISH    COLUMBIA 

of  the  Coast  Quarries,  Ltd.,  the  British  Columbia  Dental  Supply  Company,  Ltd., 
and  the  Alberta  Lumber  Company,  Ltd. 

In  political  belief  Mr.  Bird  tends  to  the  socialistic  party,  and  in  1908  was 
elected  alderman  of  Vancouver,  in  which  connection  he  exercises  his  official 
prerogatives  in  support  of  various  beneficial  public  measures.  He  holds  member- 
ship in  the  Terminal  City  Club  and  belongs  also  to  the  Masonic  fraternity  of  Van- 
couver. 

On  the  ist  of  July,  1899,  in  Kenora,  Ontario,  Mr.  Bird  was  married  to  Miss 
Caroline  Mary  Irwin,  a  daughter  of  James  and  Elizabeth  (Boyd)  Irwin,  the 
former  a  lumberman  of  Peterboro,  Ontario.  The  two  children  of  this  marriage 
are  Henry  and  Edward  Bird.  In  the  decade  or  more  of  his  residence  in  Van- 
couver, Mr.  Bird  has  become  widely  and  favorably  known,  not  only  professionally 
but  in  other  connections,  and  as  a  man  and  citizen  ranks  high,  while  as  a  bar- 
rister his  position  is  among  the  foremost. 


DAVID  S.  CURTIS. 

David  S.  Curtis,  one  of  the  foremost  and  most  influential  citizens  of  New 
Westminster,  has  been  continuously  and  successfully  engaged  in  business  as  a 
druggist  of  the  city  for  more  than  three  decades  and  is  today  the  proprietor  of 
the  oldest  drug  store  on  the  mainland  in  British  Columbia.  His  birth  occurred 
in  Cleveland,  Ohio,  on  the  ist  of  January,  1856,  his  parents  being  Samuel  and 
Jane  (Goodhue)  Curtis,  both  of  whom  were  natives  of  England,  the  former 
born  in  Devonshire  and  the  latter  in  Kent.  They  were  married  in  that  country 
and  came  to  Canada  about  1848,  locating  in  the  county  of  Elgin.  Samuel  Curtis 
was  engaged  in  business  as  a  merchant  of  St.  Thomas  and  passed  away  in  the 
county  of  Elgin  about  1863,  having  resided  there  continuously  since  coming 
from  England  with  the  exception  of  a  brief  period  spent  in  Cleveland,  Ohio. 
His  widow,  who  came  to  British  Columbia  in  1873,  married  a  second  time,  be- 
coming the  wife  of  Dr.  L.  R.  Mclnnis.  Her  demise  occurred  in  the  spring 
of  1901. 

David  S.  Curtis  was  reared  under  the  parental  roof,  acquiring  his  education 
in  the  public  schools  of  Ontario.  Subsequently  he  became  connected  with  the 
drug  business  in  Dresden,  Ontario.  In  1874  he  came  to  British  Columbia,  lo- 
cating in  New  Westminster,  and  entered  the  service  of  James  Cunningham,  a 
general  merchant.  At  the  end  of  three  years  in  that  gentleman's  employ  he 
took  up  the  study  of  medicine  with  his  stepfather,  who  was  at  that  time  medical 
officer  for  the  Vancouver  Coal  Company  and  stationed  at  Nanaimo.  At  the 
end  of  a  year,  however,  he  abandoned  his  reading  and  returned  to  the  employ 
of  James  Cunningham,  with  whom  he  remained  until  1882.  In  that  year,  in 
association  with  Dr.  Sibree  Clarke,  he  established  himself  in  the  drug  business 
under  the  firm  name  of  D.  S.  Curtis  &  Company,  the  partnership  existing  for 
two  years.  On  the  expiration  of  that  period  Dr.  Clarke  removed  to  Kamloops 
and  Mr.  Curtis  became  sole  proprietor  of  the  establishment,  which  he  has  con- 
ducted independently  to  the  present  time.  It  is  today  the  oldest  drug  store  on 
the  mainland  in  British  Columbia,  and  as  its  owner  Mr.  Curtis  has  won  a 
gratifying  and  well  merited  measure  of  prosperity.  His  splendid  executive 
ability  and  sound  business  judgment  have  been  recognized  to  such  an  extent 
that  his  aid  and  cooperation  have  been  sought  in  the  control  and  management 
of  various  other  interests.  He  is  the  president  of  the  Surrey  Nurseries,  a 
shareholder  in  the  Western  Paper  Mills,  is  a  stockholder  in  the  Pacific  Coast 
Fire  Insurance  Company,  and  acts  as  chairman  of  the  board  of  managers  of 
Columbia  College  and  a  governor  of  Ryerson  College  of  Vancouver.  On  the 
Board  of  Trade  he  has  been  a  prominent  figure,  now  serving  as  chairman  of  its 
imperial  home  reunion  committee,  chairman  of  its  market  and  produce  com- 
mittee, chairman  of  its  legislative  committee  and  as  a  member  of  its  council. 


DAVID   S.   Cl'KTIS 


BRITISH    COLUMBIA  129 

He  has  likewise  held  the  important  offices  of  president  and  secretary-treasurer 
of  the  Board  of  Trade,  president  of  the  British  Columbia  Pharmaceutical  Asso- 
ciation, president  of  the  Retail  Merchants'  Association  and  president  of  the 
Young  Men's  Christian  Association.  He  is  a  director  of  the  Tranquille  Sana- 
torium for  Consumptives  and  of  the  Royal  Agricultural  &  Industrial  Society. 

In  1886  Mr.  Curtis  was  united  in  marriage  to  Miss  Harriet  Cunningham,  her 
father  being  John  Cunningham,  a  prominent  contractor  of  Kingston,  Ontario. 
Unto  them  have  been  born  six  children,  three  sons  and  three  daughters,  as 
follows:  Alice  Muriel,  who  is  the  wife  of  Dr.  J.  G.  Davidson,  of  Vancouver; 
Arthur  G.,  who  is  engaged  in  the  lumber  business  in  the  state  of  Washington; 
Leslie  W.,  who  is  engaged  in  the  hardware  business  at  New  Westminster; 
Edith  M.,  at  home;  Florence  G.,  a  student  in  the  Columbian  College,  and 
George  E.,  who  attends  the  Westminster  high  school. 

In  political  circles  and  public  life  Mr.  Curtis  is  also  well  known  and  active. 
He  did  able  work  as  a  member  of  the  board  of  aldermen  for  ten  years  and 
then,  in  1893,  was  chosen  mayor,  giving  his  city  a  progressive  and  businesslike 
administration.  He  has  likewise  served  in  the  capacity  of  school  trustee  and  the 
cause  of  education  has  ever  found  in  him  a  stanch  friend.  He  was  formerly 
president  of  the  New  Westminster  District  and  the  New  Westminster  City 
Conservative  Association  and  is  ex-vice  president  of  the  Provincial  Conservative 
Association.  Every  movement  for  the  development  and  advancement  of  the 
city  receives  his  active  support  and  cooperation,  and  his  public-spirited  citizen- 
ship has  often  been  manifested  when  he  has  sacrificed  his  own  interests  in 
order  to  aid  and  encourage  projects  instituted  for  the  general  welfare.  He  is 
the  secretary,  treasurer  and  trustee  of  the  Methodist  church  at  New  Westminster, 
holds  the  office  of  vice  president  of  the  British  Columbia  branch  of  the  Canadian 
Bible  Society  and  acts  as  president  of  the  local  branch  of  the  Canadian  Bible 
Society.  Fraternally  he  is  identified  with  Royal  City  Lodge,  No.  3,  I.  O.  O.  F., 
and  the  Woodmen  of  the  World,  being  consul  commander  of  the  latter  order. 
He  likewise  belongs  to  the  Royal  Templars.  Mr.  Curtis  is  always  courteous, 
kindly  and  affable  and  those  who  know  him  personally  have  for  him  warm 
regard.  In  his  life  are  the  elements  of  greatness  because  of  the  use  he  has 
made  of  his  talents  and  his  opportunities,  because  his  thoughts  are  not  self- 
centered,  but  are  given  to  the  mastery  of  life  problems  and  the  fulfillment  of 
his  duty  as  a  man  in  his  relations  to  his  fellowmen  and  as  a  citizen  in  his  rela- 
tions to  his  city,  province  and  country. 


WILLIAM  ERNEST  BURNS. 

William  Ernest  Burns,  barrister,  was  born  in  Milton,  Ontario,  June  19,  1873, 
a  son  of  Nelson  and  Eleanor  (Tyler)  Burns,  both  of  whom  were  natives  of 
Ontario.  The  father  was  a  Methodist  minister  but  is  now  deceased. 

William  E.  Burns  attended  the  Jarvis  Street  College  of  Toronto  and  the 
Toronto  University,  from  which  he  was  graduated  with  the  Bachelor  of  Arts 
degree  in  1895.  He  afterward  spent  two  years  in  journalism  in  connection  with 
Toronto  papers  and  then  took  up  the  study  of  law  at  Osgoode  Hall,  Toronto. 
He  was  called  to  the  bar  of  Ontario  in  1900  and  in  the  same  year  came  to  Van- 
couver as  resident  attorney  for  the  Vananda  Mining  Company.  He  soon  after- 
ward entered  upon  general  practice  in  which  he  still  continues.  In  1902  Mr. 
Burns  admitted  Harold  M.  Daly,  a  son  of  the  late  Hon.  T.  Mayne  Daly,  to  a 
partnership,  this  connection  continuing  until  1905,  when  Mr.  Daly  withdrew  to 
enter  financial  circles.  He  was  succeeded  by  'Knox  Walkem  and  they  are  now 
practicing  under  the  firm  style  of  Burns  &  Walkem.  While  they  engaged  in 
general  practice  they  have  much  mining  litigation  and  Mr.  Burns  is  counsel  for 
a  number  of  mining  corporations.  He  has  for  several  years  been  solicitor  for 

the  district  of  North  Vancouver.     He  is  commissioner,  by  royal  appointment,  to 
voi.  m—  5 


130  BRITISH    COLUMBIA 

inspect  and  report  on  all  matters  pertaining  to  the  coal  industry  in  the  "province 
of  British  Columbia  and  is  counsel  for  the  Burrard  Inlet  Tunnel  &  Bridge  Com- 
pany and  other  corporations. 

In  Peterboro,  Ontario,  on  the  2d  of  June,  1903,  Mr.  Burns  was  united  in 
marriage  to  Miss  Catherine  M.  Hall,  a  daughter  of  Adam  Hall,  a  prominent 
resident  of  that  city  and  head  of  the  Hall  Foundry  Company.  The  two  children 
of  this  marriage  are  Elizabeth  Tyler  and  William  Ernest.  Mr.  Burns  is  a 
conservative  in  politics  and  is  a  member  of  the  board  of  police  commissioners 
for  the  city  of  Vancouver.  He  belongs  to  the  Jericho  Country  Club,  Shaughnessy 
Heights  Golf  Club  and  Victoria  Golf  and  Country  Clubs,  associations  which 
indicate  something  of  his  personal  as  well  as  professional  prominence. 


JAMES  ROGERS  GILLEY. 

For  many  years  connected  with  the  firm  of  Gilley  Brothers  of  New  West- 
minster, James  Rogers  Gilley  occupied  an  important  position  in  the  commercial 
life  of  his  community,  being  highly  regarded  by  all  who  knew  him  for  his 
straightforward  business  methods  and  his  honorable  dealings.  His  death,  on 
August  n,  1906,  removed  from  the  city's  activities  one  of  its  foremost  citizens 
and  a  man  who  even  in  a  short  span  of  life  had  done  much  to  promote  the 
general  welfare. 

James  R.  Gilley  was  born  in  St.  Andrews,  New  Brunswick,  June  12,  1863,  a 
son  of  Walter  and  Sarah  (Rogers)  Gilley.  There  he  was  reared  and  educated 
but  in  1886,  when  twenty-three  years  of  age,  came  to  British  Columbia  to  join 
his  brothers,  Walter  R.  and  H.  Gilley,  who  had  located  here  a  few  years  previously. 
After  his  arrival  here  he  engaged  in  the  teaming  and  livery  business  in  company 
with  his  brother  Walter  at  Port  Haney  for  a  year.  In  1887  they  removed  to  New 
Westminster,  establishing  themselves  in  the  same  line,  and  here  the  three  brothers 
were  associated  in  business  for  about  five  years,  at  the  end  of  which  period  the 
livery  stable  was  disposed  of,  all  their  attention  being  given  to  their  teaming. 
Gradually  the  present  extensive  business  of  Gilley  Brothers  developed  and  new 
lines  were  taken  up,  including  handling  of  building  materials,  coal,  crushed  rock 
and  sewer  pipe,  they  also  becoming  in  time  owners  of  extensive  quarries.  The 
firm  gradually  built  up  a  business  which  was  second  to  few,  if  any,  in  their 
line  in  the  province.  , 

In  1890  James  R.  Gilley  returned  to  New  Brunswick  for  his  bride  and  on 
the  2  ist  of  October  of  that  year  was  united  in  marriage  to  Miss  Sarah  Adelma 
Dean,  a  daughter  of  Rufus  P.  and  Mary  (Smith)  Dean,  of  St.  David,  New 
Brunswick.  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Gilley  became  the  parents  of  eight  children:  Reita 
Sarah;  Edgar  Roland  and  James  Royden,  twins;  Rufus  Walter;  Marjorie 
Evelyn ;  Beatrice  Adelma ;  Verna  Muriel ;  and  Jean  Rogers  Dean. 

Mr.  Gilley  always  took  an  active  interest  in  fraternal  affairs  and  was  a  well 
known  member  of  Union  Lodge,  No.  9,  A.  F.  &  A.  M.  Beside  his  connection 
with  the  firm  of  Gilley  Brothers  he  was  interested  in  other  commercial  enterprises, 
having  made  judicious  investments  as  prosperity  came  to  him.  He  stood  ever 
ready  to  give  his  support  to  any  worthy  movement  that  he  considered  would 
benefit  his  adopted  city  and  gave  an  example  of  public-spirited  citizenship  well 
worthy  of  emulation.  Strictly  temperate  in  his  habits,  he  was  upright  and 
honorable  in  all  his  dealings  and  although  entitled  to  prominence  and  recognition, 
was  modest  and  unassuming  in  his  demeanor.  Frank,  open-hearted  and  genial, 
he  was  easily  approachable  and  personally  popular,  his  generous  nature  making 
him  a  favorite  among  all  who  knew  him.  He  was  always  willing  to  give  his 
share  of  time  and  money  to  any  measure  that  had  for  its  object  the  good  of  the 
community,  never  taking  into  consideration  if  such  measures  would  benefit  him 
financially  or  not.  Naturally  his  death  therefore  was  a  heavy  loss  to  the  city 
of  New  Westminster,  where  he  died  August  n,  1906,  the  news  of  his  demise 


JAMES  K.  G1LLEY 


BRITISH    COLUMBIA  133 

bringing  sorrow  to  many  a  home.  Mrs.  Gilley,  who  survives,  makes  her  home 
in  the  beautiful  residence  which  he  erected  on  Eighth  street  shortly  prior  to  his 
death.  She  is  a  woman  of  many  charming  qualities  and  is  rarely  accomplished 
and  is  socially  popular  among  the  best  people  of  New  Westminster. 


JAMES  BUCKHAM  KENNEDY. 

The  history  of  any  community  resolves  itself  into  the  history  of  the  lives 
of  the  men  whose  activities  have  been  responsible  for  its  upbuilding,  and  in  the 
history  of  the  province  of  British  Columbia  this  fact  is  doubly  true.  Her 
remarkable  growth  of  more  recent  years  is  largely  due  to  the  lumber  industry, 
and  no  history  of  the  province  would  be  complete  without  prominent  mention  of 
those  men,  whose  careers  are  inseparably  a  part  of  the  history  of  that  industry. 
Such  a  man  is  James  Buckham  Kennedy,  who  came  to  British  Columbia  in 

1877,  and  who,   immediately  upon  his  arrival   in   Granville,   now   the  city   of 
Vancouver,  became  connected  with  the  lumber  industry  in  this  province  and 
continued  to  be  identified  with  that  industry  for  more  than  thirty  years. 

James  Buckham  Kennedy  was  born  in  Bytown,  now  the  city  of  Ottawa, 
Ontario,  on  the  23d  of  February,  1844,  the  son  of  Donald  and  Janet  (Buckham) 
Kennedy,  the  former  of  whom  was  a  native  of  the  highlands  of  Scotland,  having 
first  seen  the  light  of  day  in  Perthshire,  while  the  latter  was  born  in  Dunblane, 
also  in  Perthshire,  but  in  the  lowlands  of  the  heather.  They  both  came  to 
Canada  with  their  parents,  as  young  man  and  young  woman,  the  latter  making 
the  voyage  on  a  sailing  ship,  which  was  fourteen  weeks  on  the  sea.  Their  parents 
settled  in  Ontario  in  the  vicinity  of  Ottawa,  where  the  young  people  were  reared 
and  where  they  later  married.  Donald  Kennedy,  on  attaining  man's  estate,  found 
employment  in  the  timber  camps  of  the  province,  but  later  took  up  surveying, 
which  he  followed  for  a  number  of  years,  during  which  he  laid  out  the  original 
plan  of  part  of  the  city  of  Ottawa.  He  later  engaged  in  the  contracting  and 
building  business  there  and  constructed  many  of  the  then  important  buildings  of 
the  city.  In  1855  he  retired  from  active  business  life  and  located  on  a  farm 
three  miles  outside  of  the  city  and  adjoining  the  present  government  experimental 
station,  where  he  resided  until  his  death  in  1887,  at  the  age  of  eighty-six  years. 
His  wife  died  in  1856  at  the  age  of  fifty  years. 

James  Buckham  Kennedy  attended  the  public  schools  of  Ottawa  until  he  had 
attained  the  age  of  eleven  years,  when  he  removed  to  the  farm  with  his  father, 
after  which  he  assisted  in  the  farm  work  until  the  spring  of  1868,  when  he  went 
into  Ottawa  and  secured  employment  in  the  lumberyards  of  A.  H.  Baldwin,  thus 
beginning  his  career  in  the  industry  to  which  he  has  devoted  his  active  business 
life.  Beginning  in  the  most  humble  position,  that  of  shoveling  bark,  by  industry 
and  perseverance  he  worked  his  way  up  through  the  various  positions,  and  at  the 
end  of  three  years  became  foreman  of  the  yards,  with  which  was  combined 
the  position  of  shipping  clerk,  entailing  the  full  management  of  the  yards.  He 
continued  in  this  capacity  until  the  spring  of  1877  when,  imbued  with  the  spirit 
of  the  west  and  believing  that  the  new  country  on  the  shores  of  the  Pacific  offered 
better  opportunities  to  the  young  man  of  spirit  and  determination,  he  came  to 
British  Columbia  and  found  employment  in  the  old  Hasting's  Mills  in  the  village 
of  Granville,  which,  in  1886,  became  the  city  of  Vancouver.  He  remained  there 
but  three  and  one-half  months  when  he  removed  to  New  Westminster,  where 
he  has  continued  to  reside  to  the  present  time.  On  his  arrival  here  he  entered, 
in  association  with  a  chum  who  had  come  to  British  Columbia  with  him,  into  a 
contract  with  W.  J.  Armstrong,  who  owned  a  small  sawmill,  to  run  the  mill  and 
planer  at  a  stated  sum  per  thousand  feet,  and  was  so  employed  until  August, 

1878,  when  he  went  to  Yale  and,  purchasing  a  horse  and  saddle,  rode  into  the 
interior  through  the  virgin  wilderness,  spending  some  seven  or  eight  weeks  on  the 
trip.     He  then  returned  to  New  Westminster  and  entered  the  employ  of  the 


134  BRITISH    COLUMBIA 

De  Beck  Brothers  in  what  is  now  the  Brunette  Saw  Mills,  in  which  he  operated 
a  planer.  In  1880  he  purchased  the  interest  of  G.  Ward  De  Beck  in  the  mills,  and 
from  that  time  forward  was  a  dominant  factor  in  their  management.  He  was 
one  of  the  active  spirits  in  the  incorporation  of  the  mills  in  1884  as  the  Brunette 
Saw  Mill  Company,  Limited,  and  was  president  of  the  corporation  for  several 
years,  being  connected  with  the  company  until  the  year  1910,  when  he  sold  his 
interests  and  has  since  lived  retired  from  active  business,  enjoying  the  well  earned 
fruits  of  his  labor.  During  the  thirty  years  of  his  association  with  the  Brunette 
Saw  Mill  Company,  Limited,  and  its  predecessor,  the  Brunette  Saw  Mills,  Mr. 
Kennedy  was  a  prime  factor  in  building  up  the  mills  to  their  present  size  and 
prosperous  condition,  these  mills  today  being  conceded  to  be  the  best  paying  mills, 
in  ratio  to  the  capital  invested,  in  the  province  of  British  Columbia. 

Though  retired  from  the  active  pursuit  of  business  Mr.  Kennedy  has  made 
judicious  investment  of  his  competency,  and  is  identified  with  a  number  of  finan- 
cial and  business  institutions,  being  a  shareholder  of  the  Westminster  Trust  Com- 
pany and  of  the  British  Columbia  Brass  Company,  Limited,  of  New  Westminster. 

On  the  3Oth  day  of  November,  1880,  Mr.  Kennedy  married  Miss  Josephine 
Eugenie  De  Beck  of  New  Westminster,  a  sister  of  Captain  C.  H.  De  Beck, 
extended  mention  of  whom  will  be  found  on  other  pages  of  this  work.  To 
them  was  born  one  son,  Clarence  George  Kennedy,  who  died  at  Vernon,  British 
Columbia,  at  the  age  of  twenty-six  years.  Mrs.  Kennedy  was  called  to  her 
Maker  in  1882,  and  in  June,  1890,  Mr.  Kennedy  was  again  wedded,  leading  to 
the  altar  Mrs.  Mary  A.  (Smith)  Lloyd,  the  widow  of  Dr.  D.  Lloyd,  and  a  native 
of  Ontario. 

Mr.  Kennedy  has  been  a  citizen  of  New  Westminster  and  of  the  province  of 
British  Columbia  in  every  sense  that  the  word  "citizen"  implies.  He  has  always 
been  active  in  the  support  of  measures  pertaining  to  municipal  welfare,  and 
believing  that  it  is  the  duty  of  a  true  citizen  to  give  a  measure  of  his  time  and 
energy  to  the  duties  of  government,  has  done  valuable  service  for  his  city  in 
various  capacities,  including  two  years  as  a  member  of  the  city  council  and  several 
years  as  a  member  of  the  school  board,  and  has  in  many  other  ways  given 
tangible  evidence  of  his  worth  as  a  citizen.  In  1904  he  was  appointed  a  member 
of  the  board  of  pilot  commissioners  for  the  pilotage  district  of  New  Westminster 
and  has  been  continuously  a  member  of  the  board  to  the  present  time.  He  is  a 
liberal  in  politics  and  has  been  an  important  factor  in  the  party  and  a  tireless 
worker  for  its  interests.  In  1894  he  was  returned  to  the  provincial  parliament 
and  represented  New  Westminster  in  the  legislative  assembly  for  four  years.  In 
1904  higher  political  honors  were  accorded  him  and  he  was  returned  to  the 
Dominion  parliament,  and  until  1908  represented  the  New  Westminster  district 
in  that  body.  It  is  worthy  of  record,  as  a  source  of  inspiration  to  others,  to 
state  that  Mr.  Kennedy,  while  sitting  in  parliament,  was  accorded  the  pleasure  of 
telling  his  colleagues  that  he  had  worked  as  a  common  laborer  on  the  parliament 
buildings  in  which  he  was  then  sitting  as  a  member. 

Not  only  has  Mr.  Kennedy  occupied  an  important  place  in  the  business  and 
political  life  of  his  city,  but  he  has,  as  well,  borne  his  part  in  the  social  and  moral 
uplift  of  the  community.  He  is  a  member  of  the  Royal  Templars  and  the  dean  of 
Pythianism  in  New  Westminster  as  a  member  of  Royal  Lodge,  No.  6,  Knights  of 
Pythias,  of  New  Westminster.  He  is  a  member  of  the  Young  Men's  Christian 
Association,  while  Mrs.  Kennedy  is  a  member  of  the  Young  Women's  Christian 
Association.  They  both  hold  membership  in  the  Knox  Presbyterian  church  of 
Sapperton,  in  which  Mr.  Kennedy  is  an  elder  and  to  which  they  are  both  liberal 
contributors  to  the  various  charitable  and  other  funds,  and  in  the  general  welfare 
of  which  they  are  earnest  workers. 

Coming  to  the  great  west  in  the  first  blush  of  his  manhood  he  has  remained 
for  nearly  forty  years  an  essential  factor  in  its  development  along  business, 
political,  intellectual  and  moral  lines.  Choosing  as  his  place  of  residence  a  land 
where  history  is  making,  a  country  whose  natural  resources  have  not  yet  been 
developed  to  a  tenth  part  of  their  full  extent,  he  has  taken  a  part  in  shaping 


BRITISH    COLUMBIA  135 

the  destiny  of  the  city  with  which  he  became  identified  and,  as  the  years  have 
passed,  has  reached  a  place  of  eminence  in  all  walks  of  life.  While  his  activities 
have  been  largely  concentrated  upon  his  business  enterprises,  his  influence  has 
ever  been  a  steady,  moving  force  for  those  interests  which  are  vital  to  the  best 
development  of  the  individual  and  the  country  at  large.  No  man  in  New  West- 
minster is  more  highly  respected  or  better  deserves  the  honor  and  esteem  in 
which  he  is  held  by  his  fellowmen  than  James  Buckham  Kennedy. 


JOHN  REID. 

John  Reid,  proprietor  of  the  Westminster  Iron  Works  and  one  of  the  substan- 
tial and  influential  citizens  of  New  Westminster,  has  for  forty  years  been  a 
resident  of  Canada  and  for  thirty-six  years  of  British  Columbia.  He  was  born 
at  Carrickfergus,  County  Antrim,  Ireland,  March  28,  1852,  and  is  a  son  of 
Ezekial  and  Mary  (Neason)  Reid,  who  were  also  natives  of  County  Antrim, 
Ireland,  where  their  entire  lives  were  spent,  the  father  passing  away  at  the  age  of 
eighty-two  years  and  the  mother  when  seventy-six  years  of  age. 

John  Reid  was  reared  upon  the  home  farm  and  had  but  limited  educational 
opportunities  for,  being  the  eldest  of  the  children,  his  services  were  needed  in 
the  fields,  leaving  him  little  time  to  attend  school.  He  remained  under  the 
parental  roof  until  he  had  attained  his  majority  and  in  1873  he  came  to  Canada 
to  start  upon  an  independent  business  career.  Settling  in  Ottawa  he  there 
apprenticed  himself  to  the  blacksmith's  trade  and  was  employed  in  the  building 
of  the  machinery  house  of  the  Ottawa  Waterworks  and  on  the  building  of  the 
Kenzie  block  of  the  parliament  building.  He  completed  his  apprenticeship  at 
blacksmithing  in  that  connection  and  on  the  6th  of  May,  1877,  arrived  in  Victoria, 
British  Columbia,  in  order  to  profit  by  and  share  in  the  opportunities  furnished 
in  the  far  west.  A  few  weeks  later  he  came  to  New  Westminster  and  on  the 
6th  of  June  he  began  work  at  his  trade  in  the  shop  of  W.  R.  Lewis.  He  was 
employed  for  two  years  by  Mr.  Lewis  as  a  journeyman  and  then  recognition  of 
his  ability  won  him  the  position  of  foreman,  in  which  capacity  he  served  for 
seven  years.  In  1886  he  purchased  the  business  from  his  employer  and  entered 
into  a  partnership  with  William  Currie,  conducting  an  enterprise  under  the  name 
of  the  Reid  &  Currie  Iron  Works.  This  partnership  continued  until  August, 
1893,  when  the  widespread  financial  panic  of  that  year  caused  them  to  discon- 
tinue. The  following  year  Mr.  Reid  engaged  in  business  independently,  estab- 
lishing the  Westminster  Iron  Works.  At  that  time  he  was  not  only  without 
capital  but  was  in  debt  to  the  sum  of  several  thousand  dollars,  and  in  the  fire  of 
1898  his  establishment  was  destroyed  without  any  insurance  upon  it.  Even  this 
condition  did  not  discourage  him.  With  renewed  energy  he  set  to  wo'rk  to 
retrieve  his  lost  possessions  and  win  that  success  which  then  seemed  far  from 
his  grasp.  He  immediately  rebuilt  and  on  Tuesday  morning  following  the  fire 
had  two  forges  in  his  new  building  which  was  open  for  business.  He  was  the 
first  to  resume  operations  in  his  line  and  was  the  only  man  in  New  Westminster 
who  would  undertake  certain  kinds  of  work  such  as  steel  beams  and  other 
heavy  building  iron  work.  The  first  year  following  the  fire  was  a  very  successful 
one  for  him  and  from  that  start  he  developed  his  present  extensive  manufactur- 
ing business.  He  is  now  planning  the  erection  of  a  large  and  modern  plant  on 
Lulu  island  in  the  near  future.  The  output  of  the  Westminster  Iron  Works 
includes  all  kinds  of  machine  work  and  all  kinds  of  iron  work,  making  a  specialty 
of  ornamental  work  for  which  he  has  one  of  the  best  equipped  plants  in  the 
province.  Gradually  the  business  has  grown,  its  trade  increasing  year  by  year, 
and  today  his  is  one  of  the  largest  and  most  prosperous  productive  industies  of 
the  city.  Mr.  Reid  is  also  the  president  of  the  British  Columbia  Brass  Com- 
pany at  Sapperton,  is  a  director  of  the  British  Pacific  Coal  Company,  on  Graham 
island,  which  has  from  eight  to  nine  thousand  acres  of  rich  coal  land,  and  valuable 


136  BRITISH    COLUMBIA 

timber  and  good  farming  lands.  His  success  is  indicated  by  his  various  invest- 
ments, all  of  which  have  been  judiciously  placed.  He  resolved  at  the  outset  of 
his  career  that  he  would  win  success  if  industry  and  perseverance  could  accom- 
plish it  and  his  achievement  shows  that  this  can  be  done. 

In  1883  Mr.  Reid  was  united  in  marriage  to  Miss  Jessie  Irving,  of  Hammond, 
British  Columbia,  a  daughter  of  Adam  Irving,  one  of  the  pioneer  farmers  of  this 
section.  They  have  become  parents  of  seven  children :  William  Irving,  who  is 
now  assistant  manager  of  his  father's  business ;  Mary  Elizabeth,  the  wife  of 
James  A.  Blair,  superintendent  of  the  ornamental  department  of  the  business; 
Genevieve  May,  at  home ;  Catherine,  assistant  bookkeeper  in  her  father's  office ; 
John,  a  machinist  in  his  father's  shop;  and  James  Sidney  and  Robert  Stanley, 
both  in  school. 

Mr.  Reid  belongs  to  Royal  Lodge,  K.  P.,  and  to  the  Woodmen  of  the  World. 
In  more  strictly  social  lines  he  is  connected  with  the  Burnaby  Country  Club  and 
the  Westminster  Progressive  Club.  He  served  for  some  years  in  the  city  council 
and  on  the  school  board  and  is  a  member  of  the  Board  of  Trade.  His  military 
record  is  that  of  a  member  of  the  One  Hundred  and  Fourth  Regiment  of  the 
Canada  Militia.  He  probably  is  the  oldest  service  man  in  British  Columbia, 
holding  the  long  service  medal,  having  for  thirty-five  years  been  an  active  member 
of  that  and  other  commands.  He  refused  a  commission  on  account  of  not  having 
time  to  devote  to  the  duties  connected  therewith,  but  is  now  serving  as  pay 
sergeant.  In  politics  he  is  a  liberal.  He  contributes  to  the  support  of  the  Meth- 
odist church,  of  which  his  wife  is  a  member.  Mr.  Reid  is  one  of  the  foremost 
business  men  and  public-spirited  citizens  of  New  Westminster,  being  numbered 
among  the  leaders  in  the  promotion  of  any  enterprise  and  project  looking  to  the 
welfare  of  his  home  city.  For  several  years  past  he  has  held  the  appbintment 
of  justice  of  the  peace.  What  he  has  undertaken  he  has  accomplished  and 
though  difficulties  and  obstacles  have  arisen,  he  has  overcome  these  and  today 
is  one  of  the  leading  residents  of  New  Westminster,  capably  controlling  exten- 
sive and  important  business  affairs.  He  deserves  much  credit  for  what  he  has 
done  and  his  record  should  serve  to  inspire  and  encourage  others,  showing  what 
can  be  accomplished  by  diligence  and  determination. 


ALFRED  WILLIAMS. 

Alfred  Williams,  one  of  the  foremost  consulting  engineers  of  the  Pacific 
coast  and  a  man  who  has  left  traces  of  his  work  in  various  parts  of  the  Dominion, 
is  considered  one  of  the  authorities  on  engineering  in  the  Dominion.  Of  late 
he  has  made  his  home  in  Vancouver,  where  he  has  been  connected  with  some 
of  the  most  important  building  projects  and  has  also  done  work  of  paramount 
importance  in  neighboring  cities.  His  wide  experience  in  all  kinds  of  munic- 
ipal and  private  work  and  railway  construction  has  prepared  him  especially  for 
investigating  work  and  for  acting  as  arbitrator  upon  important  cases,  and  he 
has  become  recognized  so  widely  that  his  opinions  and  reports  are  in  great  de- 
mand and  highly  valued,  his  whole  time  of  late  being  given  to  important  investi- 
gations which  often  involve  hundreds  of  thousands  of  dollars.  Mr.  Williams 
is  a  native  of  England,  being  born  in  Worcester  on  October  6,  1865,  and  is  a 
son  of  John  and  Sarah  Ann  (Dudley)  Williams,  both  natives  of  that  city.  The 
father  was  for  many  years  inspector  of  public  works  in  London  and  passed 
away  in  October,  1912.  The  mother  now  makes  her  home  in  Birmingham, 
England. 

Alfred-  Williams  was  reared  amid  the  refining  influences  of  a  well-to-do 
home  and  received  his  professional  education  at  the  Birmingham  School  of 
Arts  and  the  London  City  Guilds,  graduating  from  the  latter  in  1887  with  the 
degree  of  C.  E.  When  only  nineteen  years  of  age  he  was  already  supervising 
engineer  for  the  erection  of  the  municipal  buildings  and  the  Grand  Theatre  of 


ALFRED    WILLIAMS 


BRITISH    COLUMBIA  139 

Birmingham.  Upon  completing  his  course  he  became  an  assistant  engineer  fo* 
the  city  of  Manchester  and  the  borough  of  Sulford,  holding  this  office  for  sev- 
eral years.  He  was  chief  engineer  on  the  construction  of  the  Manchester  sewer 
system,  doing  important  and  original  work  along  that  line — a  system  which  is 
at  present  being  practically  duplicated  in  Vancouver.  He  then  engaged  with 
the  Lancastershire  &  Yorkshire  Railway  as  engineer  in  the  department  of 
bridges  and  stations  and  was  engaged  in  the  building  of  signal  cabins.  He  put 
in  the  entire  block  system  and  signal  service  on  that  road,  installing  signal  cabins 
with  as  many  as  three  hundred  levers.  In  June,  1903,  Mr.  Williams  came  to 
Toronto  and  engaged  in  private  practice  as  consulting  engineer,  at  that  time 
having  important  contracts  in  Toronto,  Ontario,  and  Montreal,  spending  seven 
years  in  the  east.  He  built  three  of  the  largest  exhibition  buildings  for  Toronto, 
the  nine-story  reinforced  concrete  Darling  building  of  that  city,  the  first  of 
this  kind  of  construction  to  be  built  in  Canada,  and  the  Bell  Telephone  building 
at  Toronto,  beside  many  other  important  public  and  municipal  structures  in 
Ontario.  He  was  also  retained  for  the  Canadian  H.  W.  Johns-Manville  Com- 
pany and  while  associated  with  this  concern  was  engineer  in  the  installation 
of  the  St.  Thomas  (Ont.)  municipal  heating  plant,  the  St.  Thomas  Packing 
Company's  cold  storage  plant,  the  William  Davis  Cold  Storage  Company's  plant, 
the  Toronto  University  heating  plant  and  the  heat  distributing  and  power  plant 
at  McGill  University,  Montreal.  He  is  a  member  of  the  Engineers  Club  of 
Toronto,  which  is  connected  with  the  faculty  of  the  university  of  that  city. 
He  has  since  written  and  read  many  articles  on  engineering  problems  for  the 
university  and  the  public. 

In  May,  1910,  Mr.  Williams  came  to  Vancouver,  his  first  work  being  the 
large  Metropolitan  building,  which  includes  the  beautiful  Terminal  City  Club. 
It  is  one  of  Vancouver's  largest  and  finest  office  buildings.  He  has  had  entire 
charge  of  the  construction  of  this  building  from  beginning  to  end,  and  since, 
has  erected  many  other  large  office  and  apartment  buildings  in  this  city.  He 
has  now  finished  projects  for  two  fine  ten-story  buildings  which  will  probably 
be  erected  within  the  coming  year  and  has  just  completed  the  Grauer  block  at 
Eburne,  which  is  the  largest  and  most  modern  building  in  that  town.  He  is 
the  owner  for  Canada  of  the  Jester  fireproof  partitions,  which  are  patented  and, 
being  only  two  inches  thick,  are  a  great  space  saver  while  strictly  fire  and  sound 
proof.  These  partitions  are  now  being  installed  in  the  new,  beautiful  apartment 
house,  Grace  Court,  at  the  corner  of  Comox  and  Cardero  streets,  and  several 
other  large  buildings  in  Vancouver.  For  the  past  year  Mr.  Williams'  whole 
efforts  have  been  given  to  his  consulting  practice  and  to  supervising,  investigat- 
ing and  arbitrations.  His  wide  experience  makes  him  an  authority  upon  all 
subjects  that  have  to  do  with  engineering  and  his  opinions  are  accepted  as  definite 
by  the  profession.  He  has  given  decisions  in  most  important  cases  where  large 
sums  of  money  have  been  involved,  and  his  opinions  have  always  satisfied  both 
contending  parties.  Moreover,  Mr.  Williams  is  president  of  the  Colonial  Sash 
&  Door  Company  at  Huntington,  British  Columbia,  a  young  and  growing  enter- 
prise. 

In  Manchester,  England,  on  March  29,  1885,  Mr.  Williams  was  married  to 
Miss  Elizabeth  Sanders,  a  daughter  of  William  Sanders,  a  prominent  stone 
contractor  of  Manchester.  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Williams  are  the  parents  of  two 
children :  Annie,  the  wife  of  Shadrick  Jones,  of  Vancouver,  formerly  of  To- 
ronto; and  Alfred  Thomas  Pearson,  attending  Langara  private  school. 

In  his  political  affiliations  Mr.  Williams  is  a  conservative,  stanchly  uphold- 
ing the  principles  of  that  organization,  and  a  member  of  the  Conservative  Asso- 
ciation of  Vancouver.  As  member  of  the  Commercial  Club  of  this  city  he  often 
finds  occasion  to  break  a  lance  for  progressive  measures  that  will  open  new 
avenues  of  trade  for  the  city.  His  religious  faith  is  that  of  the  Church  of 
England.  He  is  a  member  of  the  Sons  of  England  Society  of  Vancouver,  a 
member  of  the  blue  lodge  of  Masons  and,  along  professional  lines,  of  the  En- 
gineers Club  of  Toronto.  He  has  made  most  valuable  contributions  to  the  up- 


140  BRITISH    COLUMBIA 

building  of  Vancouver  and  the  surrounding  district  and  his  success  is  such 
that  his  methods  are  of  interest  to  the  profession.  An  analyzation  of  his  life 
record  shows  that  he  has  based  his  actions  upon  the  rules  which  govern  strict 
and  unswerving  integrity  and  unflagging  industry.  Besides  being  one  of  the 
foremost  engineers,  he  is  a  business  man  of  the  modern  type,  shrewd,  able, 
progressive  and  straightforward,  careful  of  his  own  interests,  considerate  of 
those  of  others  and  influenced  at  all  times  by  the  thought  of  the  broader  effect 
which  his  work  has  upon  the  growth  of  his  community.  Vancouver  has  im- 
measurably grown  under  his  stimulating  activities  and  as  his  valuable  work 
goes  on,  his  loyalty  and  love  for  his  adopted  city  grows  in  him,  bearing  rich 
fruit  in  realizing  valuable  public  projects. 


THOMAS  R.  PEARSON. 

From  the  time  when  New  Westminster  was  a  mere  village  the  well  directed 
activities  of  Thomas  R.  Pearson  have  been  factors  in  its  upbuilding,  and  his 
initiative  spirit,  his  energy  and  keen  business  discrimination  are  today  counted 
among  the  most  important  of  its  municipal  assets.  He  is  local  manager  for  the 
Dominion  Trust  Company,  Ltd.,  and  by  virtue  of  this  position  and  the  force 
of  his  ability  and  personality  a  power  in  financial  circles.  He  is,  moreover, 
keenly  interested  in  music,  in  literature  and  athletics,  interests  which  have 
developed  and  expanded  through  the  years,  making  him  today  a  broad  and 
liberally  cultured  man.  He  was  born  at  Oshawa,  Ontario,  on  the  2ist  of  May, 
1858,  and  is  a  son  of  Rev.  Thomas  D.  and  Isabella  Pearson,  the  former  a  Metho- 
dist minister  and  a  descendant  through  many  generations  of  a  line  of 
prominent  Methodist  clergymen.  The  maternal  branch  of  this  family  embraced 
some  very  prominent  representatives,  notably  Hon.  John  Robson,  at  one  time 
premier  of  British  Columbia ;  Rev.  Ebenezer  Robson,  a  pioneer  missionary,  and 
David  Robson,  editor  of  the  British  Columbian. 

Thomas  R.  Pearson  acquired  his  education  in  the  public  schools  of  his  native 
town  and  at  Ontario  College  in  Guelph,  from  which  he  was  graduated  at  the 
age  of  eighteen.  He  was  one  of  the  early  settlers  in  British  Columbia,  arriving 
in  the  province  in  1877  and  in  Victoria  in  the  5th  of  May  of  that  year.  He 
obtained  employment  first  in  the  paymaster's  office  of  the  Dominion  government 
survey  department  and  after  about  five  months'  service  assumed  the  position 
of  chief  accountant,  which  office  he  retained  until  the  department  was  abolished 
and  the  work  taken  over  by  the  Canadian  Pacific  Railway  Company.  The  head 
office  of  the  department  was  removed  from  Victoria  to  New  Westminster  in 
August,  1879,  at  which  time  Mr.  Pearson  came  to  the  latter  city.  Almost  imme- 
diately after  severing  his  connection  with  the  Dominion  service  he  turned  his 
attention  to  mercantile  pursuits,  establishing  a  book  and  stationery  business, 
which  he  conducted  successfully  for  some  time,  later  disposing  of  his  interests 
in  order  to  enter  into  partnership  with  Charles  G.  Major.  Under  the  firm  name 
of  Major  &  Pearson  the  partners  opened  a  real-estate  business  and  gradually 
secured  a  large  and  representative  patronage,  handling  a  great  deal  of  valuable 
property  and  becoming  powerful  factors  in  business  circles.  Shortly  after  the 
Dominion  Trust  Company  was  formed  in  1906  the  real-estate  and  insurance 
department  of  Major  &  Pearson's  business  became  incorporated  with  it  and 
Mr.  Pearson  was  appointed  to  the  directorate  and  was  made  local  manager  of  the 
company's  affairs  at  New  Westminster.  He  is  also  a  member  of  the  advisory 
board  of  the  same  corporation.  He  has  proved  able  and  efficient  in  the  con- 
duct of  the  important  affairs  under  his  charge  and  much  of  the  rapid  growth 
of  the  concern  in  this  city  is  due  to  his  resourceful  business  discrimination  and 
enterprising  spirit.  In  addition  to  his  connection  with  the  Dominion  Trust  Com- 
pany he  is  a  director  in  the  Pacific  Loan  Company ;  in  the  Royal  Agricultural 
and  Industrial  Society,  of  which  he  was  for  several  years  secretary ;  in  the  Pretty 


THOMAS   R.  PEARSON 


BRITISH    COLUMBIA  143 

Timber  Exchange  and  the  Vancouver  Harbor  &  Dock  Company ;  and  is  presi- 
dent of  Pearson's  Ltd.  and  of  Western  Canada  City  Properties,  Ltd.  He  has 
invested  extensively  in  local  real  estate  and  has  also  a  three  hundred  and  thirty 
acre  farm  at  Port  Hammond,  whereon  he  raises  prize  stock  such  as  thorough- 
bred Holsteins,  Yorkshire  and  Shropshire  pigs,  and  fancy  poultry.  He  has 
exhibited  in  all  portions  of  the  province  and  has  taken  a  great  many  prizes.  All 
of  his  business  interests  are  carefully  and  conservatively  conducted  and  their 
extent  and  importance  place  him  among  the  leaders  in  business  circles  of  the 
city. 

Mr.  Pearson  married,  in  1887,  Miss  Edith  Eleanor  Major,  a  daughter  of 
Charles  George  and  Mary  E.  Major,  of  New  Westminster.  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Pear- 
son have  three  children:  Thomas  Roy,  of  Los  Angeles,  California;  Charles 
Leslie,  who  lives  upon  a  farm  at  Port  Hammond ;  and  Jeoffrey  Carmen,  who 
is  attending  school.  The  family  occupy  an  attractive  and  comfortable  residence  at 
No.  715  Royal  avenue. 

Politically  Mr.  Pearson  gives  his  allegiance  to  the  conservative  party  but  votes 
independently  when  he  feels  that  the  best  interests  of  the  community  demand 
such  action.  Although  not  an  office  seeker,  he  has  served  as  notary  public  and 
was  for  two  years  an  alderman,  discharging  his  official  duties  in  an  able  and  con- 
scientious way.  In  religion  he  is  a  devout  Methodist  and  has  always  been  active 
in  church  affairs,  holding  today  many  important  church  offices,  such  as  trustee 
and  leader  of  the  choir.  He  is  a  musician  of  considerable  ability  and  for  many  years 
has  been  well  known  in  musical  circles,  where  he  today  occupies  a  prominent  and 
honored  place.  For  the  past  thirty-three  years  he  has  been  leader  of  the  Metho- 
dist choir,  which  is  recognized  as  one  of  the  best  in  this  locality.  He  became 
identified  with  its  affairs  when  he  was  twenty  years  of  age  and  has  given  a  great 
deal  of  time  to  improving  its  work.  For  ten  years  he  was  also  secretary  of  the 
old  Choral  Union,  conducted  by  the  late  Rt.  Rev.  Bishop  Silitoe,  and  he  was  the 
first  honorary  president  of  the  choral  society  founded  by  Herbert  D.  Mackness. 
His  wife  also  possesses  great  musical  talent  and  for  twenty  years  was  organist 
of  the  Methodist  church  in  New  Westminster.  Mr.  Pearson  counts  his  labors 
in  raising  the  standards  of  musical  appreciation  in  this  vicinity  and  iji  the  pro- 
motion of  a  more  general  love  of  good  music  not  the  least  of  his  many  achieve- 
ments for  New  Westminster,  which  owes  to  him  a  great  deal  of  its  rapid  advance- 
ment along  many  lines. 


FREDERICK  GEORGE  TANNER  LUCAS. 

Frederick  George  Tanner  Lucas,  an  active  practitioner  at  the  Vancouver  bar, 
is  specializing  in  corporation  and  marine  law.  He  is  senior  partner  in  the  firm 
of  Lucas  &  Lucas,  which  during  the  six  years  of  its  existence  has  steadily  pro- 
gressed and  is  now  accorded  a  gratifying  and  distinctively  representative  clientage. 
F.  G.  T.  Lucas  was  born  in  Alvinston,  Ontario,  September  29,  1878,  a  son  of 
Alexander  and  Jane  Frances  Lucas,  both  of  whom  were  representatives  of 
pioneer  families  of  Lambton  county,  Ontario.  Following  his  removal  to  the 
west,  the  father  figured  prominently  in  the  public  life  of  Calgary,  serving  as  first 
mayor  of  the  city  and  the  first  president  of  its  Board  of  Trade. 

Frederick  G.  T.  Lucas  pursued  his  education  in  the  public  schools  of  that 
city  until  he  had  mastered  the  branches  of  learning  therein  taught,  while  his  more 
specifically  literary  course  was  pursued  in  the  University  of  Toronto,  in  which 
he  won  the  Bachelor  of  Arts  degree  upon  graduation  with  the  class  of  1901.  The 
same  year  he  came  to  British  Columbia  and  has  since  been  identified  with  the 
northwest.  He  was  articled  for  one  year  with  J.  A.  Harvey,  K.  C.,  at  Fort 
Steele,  and  in  1902  came  to  Vancouver,  where  he  finished  his  articles  with  Harris 
&  I  lull  and  later  with  Joseph  Martin,  K.  C.,  of  Vancouver.  Having  been  called 
to  the  bar,  he  began  practice  in  1905,  remaining  alone  until  1907,  when  he  was 


144  BRITISH    COLUMBIA 

joined  by  his  brother,  E.  A.  Lucas,  in  the  organization  of  the  firm  of  Lucas  & 
Lucas,  which  has  now  had  an  existence  of  six  years. 

F.  G.  T.  Lucas  gives  his  political  allegiance  to  the  conservative  party  and  is 
prominent  as  one  of  its  local  workers,  having  served  as  president  of  the  Young 
Conservative  Association  for  three  years.  He  belongs  to  North  Star  Lodge, 
F.  &  A.  M.,  of  Fort  Steele,  British  Columbia,  and  has  also  taken  the  degree  of 
capitular  Masonry  'in  the  Royal  Arch  Chapter.  He  belongs  to  the  Terminal 
City  Club,  the  Royal  Vancouver  Yacht  Club  and  the  Vancouver  Athletic  Club. 


JOHN  JAMES  JONES. 

A  power  in  financial  circles  as  managing  director  of  the  Westminster  Trust 
Company  and  a  man  who  stands  for  civic  righteousness  as  do  few  of  the 
most  public-spirited  citizens,  John  James  Jones  is  one  of  the  foremost  and 
most  useful  of  New  Westminster's  men.  The  more  credit  is  due  him  as  his 
success  has  been  achieved  unaided  and  entirely  by  his  own  efforts.  He  advanced 
from  a  humble  position  to  the  paramount  place  which  he  now  holds  among 
the  bankers  of  this  city.  He  is  a  native  of  north  Wales,  being  born  in  Carnar- 
vonshire, November  9,  1854,  and  a  son  of  John  and  Anna  (Ellis)  Jones, 
both  natives  of  the  same  part  of  the  rock-ribbed  principality  of  Britain's  west 
coast.  There  the  mother  passed  away,  having  spent  all  her  life  among  the 
story-haunted  hills  of  her  birthland,  but  the  father  still  lives,  enjoying  fair 
health  at  the  advanced  age  of  eighty-eight  years  and  spends  the  evening  of  his 
existence  in  contemplation  and  retirement. 

John  James  Jones  was  reared  under  the  parental  roof  and  was  early  taught 
modesty,  industry  and  honesty  by  his  worthy  parents.  He  acquired  his  edu- 
cation in  the  schools  of  his  native  district  and  also  in  the  Liverpool  Institute, 
although  he  had  worked  in  the  slate  quarries  in  north  Wales  before  entering 
the  latter  institution.  After  completing  his  studies  he  was  offered  and  accepted 
the  position  of  assistant  manager  of  one  of  the  quarries,  in  which  capacity  he 
remained  for  about  five  years,  thriftily  providing  for  a  rainy  day  and  laying 
aside  his  earnings  in  order  to  embrace  opportunities  that  the  future  might 
offer.  During  these  years  Mr.  Jones  married  Miss  Ellen  Owen,  a  daughter 
of  Captain  Owen  of  Bangor,  north  Wales.  In  1881  he  undertook  the  most 
eventful  step  in  his  life  by  crossing  the  ocean  to  the  Dominion,  and  upon  his 
arrival  in  Canada  was  made  slate  inspector  at  New  Rockland,  Quebec.  There 
.he  subsequently  engaged  in  slate  roofing  and  contracting  until  in  1891  he 
followed  the  call  of  the  west  in  order  to  profit  by  the  opportunities  waiting 
the  courageous  and  enterprising.  Coming  to  British  Columbia,  he  located  in 
New  Westminster,  to  which  place  he  had  been  called  as  manager  of  the  slate 
quarries  at  Jarvis  Inlet,  and  remained  in  that  position  for  four  years  or  until 
the  time  of  the  financial  depression  which  affected  all  of  the  American  conti- 
nent. Operations  were  then  suspended  and  Mr.  Jones  was  made  by  the  courts 
liquidator  of  the  firm's  affairs,  whose  operations  he  had  largely  guided.  After 
the  closing  of  these  transactions  and  settlements  had  been  made  Mr.  Jones 
engaged  in  the  timber  business,  along  which  line  he  was  very  successful.  Five 
years  ago,  however,  he  disposed  of  his  important  lumber  holdings  and  has 
since  given  his  time  to  the  management  of  his  financial  and  property  interests, 
which  are  very  extensive.  In  1911  he  was  made  managing  director  of  the 
Westminster  Trust  Company,  in  which  capacity  he  is  now  serving.  Earnest, 
able,  conscientious,  shrewd  and  progressive,  he  has  done  much  toward  pro- 
moting and  extending  the  interests  of  this  financial  institution  whose  late 
growth  has  been  largely  due  to  his  able  direction.  His  long  and  extensive 
experience  along  various  lines  and  his  insight  into  human  nature  and  the 
springs  of  human  conduct  enable  him  to  judge  conditions  and  situations  correctly 
and  there  is  practically  no  error  which  could  be  laid  at  his  door  as  regards 


JOHN  J.  JONES 


BRITISH    COLUMBIA  147 

the  administration  of  the  bank's  affairs.  Careful  and  conservative  in  directing 
the  investments  of  the  institution,  he  is  ever  watchful  of  the  interests  of  his 
depositors,  while  on  the  other  hand  he  shows  a  progressive  tendency  in  extending 
credit  to  new  worthy  industrial  enterprises  which  may  contribute  to  the  growth 
of  the  city.  There  is  no  detail  of  operation  in  his  business  which  he  does  not 
consider  worthy  of  his  attention  and  he  is  ever  ready  to  receive  suggestions 
from  even  the  humblest  of  his  employes,  while  his  office  is  as  accessible  to 
debtor  as  it  is  to  creditor. 

As  is  but  natural,  the  aid  and  assistance  of  Mr.  Jones  have  been  solicited 
along  other  lines  and  he  has  also  made  judicious  investments  in  such  directions, 
helping  along  new  industries  and  extending  public  facilities  to  new  or  strug- 
gling municipalities.  He  is  president  and  managing  director  of  the  Elk  Creek 
Water  Company  at  Chilliwack  and  holds  the  same  positions  in  regard  to  the 
Okanagan  Telephone  Company. 

The  home  life  of  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Jones  is  an  ideal  one  and  both  of  them  are 
ever  active  in  promoting  worthy  enterprises  which  will  be  of  permanent  value 
to  their  city.  Both  are  members  of  the  Church  of  England  and  for  the  past 
fourteen  years  Mr.  Jones  has  been  warden  of  the  cathedral  here.  Mr.  and 
Mrs.  Jones  have  five  children:  Mary  Elizabeth,  the  widow  of  the  late  W.  H. 
Edmonds,  formerly  registrar  of  Kamloops;  Elizabeth  Catherine,  at  home; 
Jane  Ann,  who  married  Sydney  C.  Burton,  manager  of  the  Kamloops  Trust 
Company  of  Kamloops ;  Hugh  L. ;  and  Frederick  Edwin,  who  in  connection 
with  the  Loyal  Order  of  Moose  holds  the  position  of  secretary. 

As  member  of  the  Westminster  Club,  Mr.  Jones  finds  occasion  to  cooperate 
with  those  men  who  are  ever  considerate  of  the  future  of  the  city.  Progress 
is  his  watchword  and  he  does  apply  it  not  only  to  his  private  interests  but 
as  eagerly  takes  up  any  measure  that  may  benefit  the  public  welfare  if  it 
promises  to  be  of  permanent  value.  His  success  lies  not  so  much  in  the  powerful 
position  which  he  has  attained  as  one  of  the  wealthy  men  of  New  Westmin- 
ster but  in  the  beneficial  effect  his  actions  and  his  success  have  had  and  yet 
have  upon  the  growth  of  the  city.  From  that  point  of  view  his  life  proves 
of  the  greatest  value  and  his  actions  highly  merit  the  esteem,  respect  and  confi- 
dence which  are  readily  conceded  to  one  whose  loyalty  to  general  interests  may 
be  said  to  be  proverbial. 


JOSEPH  EDWARD  GAYNOR. 

It  has  often  been  said  that  death  loves  a  shining  mark,  and  the  truth  of  xms 
adage  found  verification  when  Joseph  Edward  Gaynor  was  suddenly  called 
away.  The  news  of  his  demise  was  a  shock  to  all  New  Westminster,  where  he 
engaged  in  the  practice  of  law  and  later  occupied  the  position  of  registrar.  He 
was  born  in  January,  1862,  at  Tullywood,  near  Moate,  West  Meath,  Ireland, 
where  his  father  was  a  large  landowner.  The  father  is  now  deceased  but  the 
mother  still  survives.  The  son  was  educated  by  private  tutors  and  in  Dublin 
University,  and  following  the  completion  of  his  studies  he  sought  the  opportuni- 
ties of  the  new  world,  making  his  way  direct  to  New  Westminster,  after  crossing 
the  Atlantic  in  1888.  Having  qualified  for  the  bar,  he  here  entered  upon  the 
practice  of  law,  becoming  a  member  of  the  law  firm  of  Armstrong,  Extine  & 
Gaynor.  After  following  his  profession  for  some  time,  however,  he  ceased  to 
practice  in  order  to  accept  the  position  of  registrar  at  New  Westminster,  to 
which  he  had  been  appointed.  He  continued  to  serve  in  that  office  most  accept- 
ably to  the  time  of  his  death,  which  occurred  while  he  was  on  his  way  home  to 
his  little  family  on  the  5th  of  June,  1900.  He  was  a  man  of  excellent  ability 
and  great  promise.  He  had  been  the  gold  medalist  of  his  class  and  his  native 
powers  and  talents  were  being  developed  along  lines  that  promised  to  make  his 
life  one  of  great  usefulness. 


148  BRITISH    COLUMBIA 

It  was  on  the  4th  of  May,  1891,  that  Mr.  Gaynor  had  married  Miss  Florence 
Mary  O'Connor,  a  daughter  of  Dr.  Morris  and  Minnie  O'Connor,  of  Ontario. 
They  became  the  parents  of  four  children :  George  Charles,  who  is  studying  for 
the  medical  profession  in  Dublin ;  Maurice,  who  is  at  Bangie  in  the  Malay  states, 
in  charge  of  a  rubber  plantation ;  Gertrude  in  school  at  New  Westminster ;  and 
John,  who  died  in  infancy.  Mr.  Gaynor  was  a  Catholic  in  religious  belief  and 
was  a  member  of  the  New  Westminster  Club.  His  sudden  death  ended  what 
promised  to  be  a  brilliant  career.  He  was  highly  respected  and  died  just  as  his 
worth  was  being  recognized,  for  he  was  still  a  young  man  when  called  to  his 
final  rest.  He  was  devoted  to  his  family,  was  faithful  in  friendship  and  loyal 
in  citizenship,  and  his  many  good  qualities  had  gained  for  him  the  esteem,  confi- 
dence and  respect  of  all  who  knew  him. 


DONALD  MALCOLM  STEWART. 

One  of  the  foremost  men  of  Vancouver,  prominent  in  business  as  well  as 
in  the  semi-public  life  of  the  city  and  deeply  interested  in  a  number  of  charitable 
institutions, — one  whose  life  has  been  of  real  value  to  his  city,  is  Donald  Mal- 
colm Stewart,  proprietor  of  the  Pioneer  Steam  Laundry,  one  of  the  most  mod- 
ern and  best  equipped  enterprises  of  this  kind  in  the  province.  Mr.  Stewart  is 
a  native  of  Glengarry  county,  Ontario,  where  he  was  born  March  i,  1862,  a  son 
of  Norman  and  Annie  (McKercher)  Stewart,  the  former  of  Scotch  extraction. 
The  father  was  a  member  of  a  large  family  which  emigrated  from  the  isle  of 
Skye,  Scotland,  to  Ontario,  where  they  became  pioneers. 

Donald  Malcolm  Stewart  acquired  a  public-school  education  in  his  native 
province  and  upon  laying  aside  his  text-books  became  a  clerk  in  a  general  store 
at  Dunvegan,  Ontario,  there  serving  an  apprenticeship  of  two  and  a  half  years, 
until  1886.  He  then  went  to  Vankleek  Hill,  Ontario,  clerking  for  a  time.  His  next 
place  of  abode  and  field  of  work  was  St.  Thomas,  that  province,  where  for  eight- 
een months  he  was  in  the  employ  of  Stacy  &  Son,  hardware  merchants.  Coming 
to  British  Columbia  in  1889  he  left  shortly  afterwards  for  Seattle,  Washington, 
where  he  was  connected  with  a  laundry  for  one  and  a  half  years,  becoming 
acquainted  with  business  methods  and  the  details  of  operation.  In  March,  1892, 
he  again  crossed  the  border  to  British  Columbia  and  came  to  Vancouver,  pur- 
chasing his  present  business  which  had  been  established  in  1890.  Since  taking 
charge  of  the  enterprise  rapid  advancement  has  been  made,  its  healthy  growth 
being  largely  due  to  the  progressive  methods  and  innate  business  ability  of  Mr. 
Stewart.  The  laundry,  which  occupies  a  fireproof  building,  is  equipped  with 
the  Jatest  machinery,  which  assures  its  patrons  the  highest  class  of  work  while 
the  processes  of  operation  are  such  as  to  guarantee  least  harm  to  the  goods 
intrusted  to  its  care.  An  idea  as  to  the  extent  of  their  business  is  given  in  the 
fact  that  thirty  delivery  wagons  are  needed  continuously  in  the  delivery  of  their 
goods. 

The  marriage  of  Mr.  Stewart  to  Miss  Mary  E.  Brown,  a  daughter  of  J.  T. 
and  Elizabeth  Brown,  occurred  on  June  17,  1896.  Her  father  was  for  many  years 
a  license  inspector  in  Vancouver,  coming  originally  to  this  city  from  Scarborough, 
Ontario.  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Stewart  have  three  children,  Norman,  Donald  and  Isabel. 

For  many  years  Mr.  Stewart  has  actively  participated  in  the  public  life  of  his 
adopted  city  and  from  1903  until  1908  gave  official  service  as  alderman  of  Van- 
couver. His  political  affiliations  are  with  the  liberal  party,  the  candidates  of 
which  he  stanchly  supports.  He  is  a  member  and  an  elder  of  St.  Andrews  Pres- 
byterian church  and  is  deeply  interested  in  its  work.  For  one  term  he  served  as 
chairman  of  the  house  committee  of  the  Vancouver  General  Hospital,  and  has 
been  for  five  years  and  is  at  present  vice  president  of  the  board  of  Alexander 
Orphanage,  these  two  latter  connections  giving  evidence  of  his  deep  love  for  man- 
kind, to  whom  he  always  stands  ready  to  extend  a  helping  hand  when  in  need 


DONALD  M.  STEWART 


BRITISH    COLUMBIA  151 

or  distress.  He  is  also  president  of  the  board  of  the  City  Central  Mission,  an 
organization  founded  for  the  purpose  of  furnishing  beds  to  the  downtrodden  and 
poverty-stricken  and  assisting  them  to  useful  positions  in  life.  Fraternally  he 
is  a  member  of  Mount  Hermon  Lodge,  A.  F.  &  A.  M.,  of  Vancouver,  and  of 
the  Independent  Order  of  Odd  Fellows,  exemplifying  the  brotherly  spirit  of 
these  lodges  in  his  daily  life.  He  has  no  club  associations  in  a  social  sense,  rind- 
ing his  truest  happiness  at  his  own  fireside.  Every  force  that  goes  forth  to  make 
Vancouver  an  ideal  city,  every  opportunity  to  raise  its  intellectual  and  moral 
standard,  receives  the  indorsement  of  Mr.  Stewart,  who  seeks  his  truest  success 
not  only  in  promoting  his  individual  prosperity  but  in  contributing  towards  the 
general  welfare.  His  sterling  qualities  are  such  as  ever  command  the  respect, 
confidence  and  good-will  of  all  with  whom  he  comes  in  contact  and  as  the  years 
have  passed  he  has  become  intrenched  in  the  affection  of  the  general  public. 


FREDERICK  JOSEPH  LYNCH. 

One  of  the  most  popular  and  widely  known  men  in  British  Columbia  is  Fred- 
erick Joseph  Lynch,  who  for  the  past  ten  years  has  been  engaged  as  cigar  manu- 
facturer in  New  Westminster  and  has  built  up  a  business  of  far-reaching  propor- 
tions. His  trade  extends  practically  all  over  the  province  and  his  business  has 
increased  from  year  to  year,  assuring  him  of  a  substantial  income.  Moreover, 
he  has  been  connected  in  various  other  ways  with  the  community  life  and  has 
been  an  important  factor  in  promoting  progress  and  advancement.  Born  in 
Peterboro,  Ontario,  on  December  31,  1877,  he  is  a  son  of  James  and  Mary 
(Haban)  Lynch,  both  natives  of  Bedford,  Pennsylvania.  They  removed  to 
Peterboro,  Ontario,  with  their  respective  parents  when  both  were  yet  in  their 
teens,  and  in  the  latter  city  they  were  married,  the  father  there  engaging  in  the 
timber  business,  being  associated  with  Theodore  Ludgate,  now  of  Vancouver. 
He  was  accidentally  killed  in  1882,  while  superintending  some  work  at  the  timber 
camps.  The  mother  is  still  living  and  makes  her  home  in  Peterboro.  She 
reared  a  family  of  eight  children  after  her  husband's  demise  and  has  had  the 
satisfaction  of  seeing  all  of  them  attain  to  substantial  positions. 

Frederick  J.  Lynch  was  educated  in  the  public  schools  of  Peterboro  and  at 
St.  Michael's  College  of  Toronto.  In  1893  ne  removed  to  Rochester,  New  York, 
where  he  spent  three  years  but  subsequently  returned  to  Peterboro,  where  he  was 
employed  in  the  clothing  business  until  1898,  when  he  sought  the  greater  oppor- 
tunities of  the  west,  coming  to  Nelson,  British  Columbia.  At  that  point  he 
entered  the  service  of  the  Hudson's  Bay  Company,  making  shortly  after  his 
arrival  an  extended  trip  with  the  Nelson  team  to  the  various  coast  cities,  and 
after  his  return  to  Nelson  came  to  New  Westminster,  accepting  a  position  with 
the  British  Columbia  Cigar  Manufacturing  Company,  representing  this  concern 
on  the  road  for  three  years.  At  the  end  of  that  period,  in  1903,  he  engaged  in 
the  manufacture  of  cigars  and  in  the  intervening  ten  years  has  built  up  one  of 
the  largest  cigar  manufacturing  enterprises  in  British  Columbia.  A  man  of 
shrewd  judgment,  remarkable  business  ability  and  a  genial  and  pleasant  person- 
ality, he  is  widely  known  throughout  the  province,  his  trade  connections  extend- 
ing to  the  remotest  part  of  British  Columbia. 

In  1905  Mr.  Lynch  was  united  in  marriage  to  Miss  Levina  Bilodeau,  a  native 
of  New  Westminster  and  a  daughter  of  Peter  O.  Bilodeau,  the  popular  and  well 
known  proprietor  of  the  Windsor  Hotel.  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Lynch  have  three  chil- 
dren :  Frances,  Frederick  and  Roy. 

Although  his  business  interests  are  large,  Mr.  Lynch  has  always  found  time 
to  devote  to  other  matters  which  round  out  his  life  and  make  his  activities  of 
importance  in  various  connections.  He  is  now  serving  in  his  third  term  as  a 
member  of  the  board  of  aldermen  of  New  Westminster  and  during  his  service 
has  done  important  work  in  constructive  municipal  legislation,  promoting  many 


152  BRITISH    COLUMBIA 

measures  which  have  turned  out  to  be  of  utmost  benefit  to  the  city.  He  believes 
that  play  takes  as  important  a  part  in  man's  life  as  does  his  work,  as  one  is 
needed  to  supplement  the  other,  and  is  well  and  widely  known  as  one  of  the 
foremost  sportsmen  in  the  province,  taking  a  deep  interest  in  all  clean  athletics. 
For  ten  years  he  played  on  the  New  Westminster  lacrosse  team  and  managed  the 
team  for  one  year  when  it  held  the  world's  championship.  In  the  last  nine  years 
they  have  lost  this  honor  but  one  year.  While  Mr.  Lynch  held  membership  in 
this  organization  he  made  two  trips  to  the  east  and  each  time  the  team  returned 
undefeated,  the  nearest  of  being  loser  coming  about  when  a  draw  game  was 
played  with  Toronto.  Mr.  Lynch  is  also  very  prominent  in  the  Order  of  Eagles, 
being  a  member  of  New  Westminster  Aerie,  No.  20.  He  was  elected  at  the 
convention  held  in  St.  Louis,  in  1910,  deputy  grand  worthy  president  of  western 
Canada  and  in  1909  was  elected  to  represent  his  home  lodge  at  the  grand  lodge. 
The  following  year  he  was  chosen  to  represent  the  grand  lodge  in  western  Canada. 
Moreover,  Mr.  Lynch  is  a  member  of  the  Westminster  Club,  taking  active  part 
in  all  movements  promoted  by  that  organization  in  the  interest  of  further  expan- 
sion along  commercial  and  moral  lines.  He  is  justly  accounted  one  of  the  leading 
men  of  his  city,  and  while  he  has  attained  personal  prosperity  which  none  can 
begrudge  him,  is  a  serviceable  factor  in  the  growth  of  the  city,  which  has  no 
more  loyal  advocate  than  Frederick  Joseph  Lynch. 


FREDERICK  BERNARD  PEMBERTON. 

A  power  of  initiative,  an  enterprising  and  progressive  spirit,  an  instinct 
for  seizing  and  utilizing  present  opportunity  have  been  the  dominating  elements 
in  the  success  of  Frederick  Bernard  Pemberton,  capitalist  and  man  of  affairs, 
whose  resultant  activities  have  influenced  the  financial  and  general  business 
growth  of  Victoria  for  the  past  quarter  of  a  century.  The  city  numbers  him 
among  her  successful  and  prominent  native  sons,  for  his  birth  occurred  here 
April  26,  1865,  his  parents  being  Joseph  D.  and  Theresa  J.  D.  Pemberton,  the 
former  one  of  the  early  settlers  in  Victoria,  having  come  to  the  city  as  surveyor 
general  for  the  Hudson's  Bay  Company. 

Mr.  Pemberton  was  sent  to  England  to  be  educated  and  there,  after  com- 
pleting the  usual  public-school  course,  he  entered  University  College,  London, 
from  which  he  was  graduated  in  1885.  He  then  returned  to  Canada,  coming 
immediately  to  his  home  in  Victoria,  where  two  years  later  he  began  his  in- 
dependent business  career,  becoming  interested  in  dealing  in  real  estate  and 
in  promoting  important  financial  projects.  In  these  and  allied  lines  of  activity 
he  has  since  been  interested,  and,  being  a  resourceful,  far-sighted  and  discrimin- 
ating financier,  he  has  been  carried  forward  into  important  business  relations, 
his  name  standing  in  Victoria  for  competence,  for  reliability,  for  business 
foresight  and  for  well  timed  business  aggressiveness.  He  today  controls  one 
of  the  largest  real-estate  and  investment  concerns  in  the  city,  his  offices  giving 
employment  to  from  eighteen  to  twenty  persons,  and  he  handles  a  great  deal 
of  valuable  property,  his  judgment  on  questions  of  land  values  being  considered 
practically  infallible.  He  has  made  some  very  judicious  private  investments 
and  today  is  a  large  holder  of  city  realty.  Through  investment  or  official  service 
he  is  connected  with  a  number  of  the  important  enterprises  in  Victoria,  being  a 
director  in  the  Victoria  Theater  and  in  other  local  corporations.  All  of  his 
business  interests  are  carefully  conducted  along  practical  and  conservative  lines 
and  success  has  naturally  followed,  his  business  achievements  placing  him  among 
the  leaders  in  the  city's  financial  and  commercial  upbuilding. 

In  Toronto,  Ontario,  in  1893  Mr.  Pemberton  was  united  in  marriage  to 
Miss  Mary  Ann  Dupont  Bell,  a  daughter  of  P.  W.  and  E.  S.  Bell,  the  former 
of  whom  was  connected  with  the  Hudson's  Bay  Company  all  during  his  active 
life,  acting  as  chief  factor  in  a  number  of  places.  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Pemberton 


FREDERICK   B.   1'EMBERTON 


BRITISH    COLUMBIA  155 

have  six  children :  Frederick  Despard,  Warren  Colclough,  Armine  Morris, 
Philippa  Despard,  Mab  Ahearn  and  Francis  John  Dupont.  The  family  is  well 
known  in  social  circles  of  the  city  and  the  home  is  a  center  of  hospitality  for 
many  friends. 

Mr.  Pemberton  belongs  to  the  Union  and  the  Pacific  Clubs  and  is  prom- 
inent in  the  affairs  of  the  Native  Sons  of  British  Columbia.  He  is  president 
of  the  Victoria  Hunt  Club  and  he  also  holds  membership  in  the  British  Colum- 
bia Land  Surveyors.  Eminently  progressive  and  public-spirited  in  matters  of 
citizenship,  he  is  always  ready  to  cooperate  in  movements  for  the  community 
advancement  and  progress  and  he  has  done  a  great  deal  to  promote  develop- 
ment through  official  service  and  through  identifying  himself  with  progressive 
public  and  semi-public  measures  and  movements.  He  is  one  of  the  councillors 
of  Oak  Bay  and  he  has  held  this  office  for  several  years,  proving  an  efficient, 
capable  and  far-sighted  public  servant.  For  several  years  past  he  has  been 
connected  with  the  Provincial  Royal  Jubilee  Hospital  as  president  of  the  board, 
and  his  interests  though  varied  are  alike  in  this — that  he  identifies  himself  with 
nothing  which  does  not  make  for  improvement  in  standards  of  citizenship,  for 
progress  in  business  or  for  the  betterment  or  amelioration  of  existing  conditions. 
After  recounting  the  things  he  has  accomplished  and  the  variety  and  importance 
of  the  movements  to  which  he 'has  lent  his  aid  and  support  it  is  perhaps  super- 
fluous to  add  that  he  is  one  of  the  city's  most  tireless  men  of  affairs,  modern 
in  his  views,  progressive  in  his  standards,  telling  in  action — a  native  son  whose 
life  record  is  a  credit  to  the  community  in  which  he  has  always  lived. 


RUSSELL  HARRY  PALMER. 

Russell  Harry  Palmer,  of  Palmer  Brothers  &  Henning,  contractors,  whose 
work,  of  a  most  important  character,  places  them  in  a  notable  position  in  their 
field  of  labor,  was  born  at  Prince  Edward  Island,  on  the  31  st  of  December,  1866, 
a  son  of  Donald  W.  and  Jean  Palmer.  The  father  was  a  merchant  and  farmer 
of  Prince  Edward  Island,  and  both  are  now  deceased.  The  son  attended  the 
public  schools  and  afterward  St.  Peters  Boys  School  at  Charlottetown,  Prince 
Edward  Island.  The  year  1889  witnessed  Mr.  Palmer's  arrival  in  Vancouver, 
although  he  remained  but  a  short  time,  going  from  this  city  to  Seattle,  Wash- 
ington, where  he  engaged  in  railroad  construction  and  in  merchandising  until 
1897.  At  the  time  of  the  discovery  of  gold  and  consequent  excitement  in  the 
Yukon  country  he  went  to  Dawson,  where  he  carried  on  merchandising  and 
mining,  continuing  a  resident  of  that  district  until  1905,  in  which  year  he  again 
came  to  Vancouver,  where  he  engaged  in  the  contracting  business.  The  firm 
of  Palmer  Brothers  &  Henning  is  accorded  a  liberal  patronage  and  their  work 
has  been  of  an  important  character.  Mr.  Palmer  is  familiar  with  the  great 
scientific  principles  which  underlie  construction  as  well  as  with  all  the  practical 
phases  and  details  of  the  business,  and  as  the  years  have  gone  by  is  developing 
powers  have  brought  him  to  a  prominent  position.  He  is  likewise  the.  secretary 
of  the  Palmer  Land  Investment  Company,  an  American  corporation  located  at 
Everett,  Washington.  Among  the  many  notable  contracts  executed  by  Palmer 
Brothers  &  Henning  was  the  building  of  the  grade  for  the  British  Columbia 
Electric  Railroad  into  Chilwack.  The  company  were  also  builders  of  the  Con- 
naught  bridge,  also  called  the  Cambie  Street  bridge,  which  was  solemnly  dedicated 
and  opened  to  traffic  by  the  Duke  of  Connaught  on  his  visit  to  Vancouver  in  1912. 
This  bridge  is  three-quarters  of  a  mile  long  and  its  construction  was  a  remark- 
able piece  of  engineering.  It  is  built  of  concrete  and  steel  throughout.  The 
company  has  also  had  several  important  contracts  for  street  paving  and  sewers, 
putting  in  the  first  unit  of  the  Lea  system  of  sewerage  in  Vancouver.  They  built 
the  grade  of  the  Canadian  Northern  Railroad  between  Hope  and  Yale  and  are 


156  BRITISH    COLUMBIA 

now  engaged  in  the  execution  of  a  contract  at  Yellowhead  Pass,  also  known  as 
Tete  Jaune  Cache. 

Mr.  Palmer  married  Miss  Claude  Dalton,  now  deceased,  and  there  are  two 
sons,  Russell  A.  and  Donald  D.,  attending  school.  Mr.  Palmer  is  an  Odd  Fellow 
and  also  holds  membership  with  the  Knights  of  Pythias,  the  Modern  Woodmen, 
the  Arctic  Brotherhood  and  the  Terminal  City  Club.  His  religious  belief  is  that 
of  the  Episcopalian  church.  He  is  fond  of  baseball,  which  constitutes  one  of  the 
sources  of  his  recreation  and  relieves  him  of  the  strain  of  an  arduous  growing 
business,  maintaining  that  even  balance  which  is  so  necessary  as  a  forceful 
factor  in  the  attainment  of  success. 


JOSEPH  ANDREW  GODDARD. 

Joseph  Andrew  Goddard  is  actively  connected  with  the  wholesale  fruit  and 
commission  business  in  Vancouver  as  senior  partner  of  the  firm  of  Goddard  & 
Witter.  A  typical  spirit  of  enterprise  and  progress  such  as  has  been  the  domi- 
nant factor  in  the  upbuilding  of  the  northwest  has  manifested  itself  in  his  busi- 
ness activities,  resulting  in  his  continuous  advancement  in  commercial  circles. 
He  was  born  in  Toronto,  Ontario,  March  n,  1880,  and  is  a  son  of  Andrew  and 
Sarah  Goddard,  the  former  for  a  number  of  years  an  engineer  on  the  Canadian 
Pacific  Railroad.  With  the  removal  of  the  family  to  the  west  Joseph  Andrew 
Goddard  became  a  pupil  in  the  public  schools  of  British  Columbia  but  afterward 
returned  to  the  east  and  attended  the  Canada  Business  College  at  Hamilton, 
Ontario.  On  his  return  to  Vancouver,  after  the  completion  of  his  college 
course,  he  was  employed  by  F.  R.  Stewart  &  Company,  wholesale  commission 
merchants,  with  whom  he  remained  for  about  eight  years,  acquainting  himself 
with  every  phase  of  the  business  and  gaining  valuable  knowledge  and  experience 
that  qualified  him  for  the  conduct  of  his  individual  interests  at  a  later  day.  In 
1908  he  started  in  business  on  his  own  account,  forming  a  partnership  with  J.  W. 
Little,  under  the  firm  name  of  Goddard  &  Little,  which  continued  until  the  death 
of  Mr.  Little  in  October,  1912,  after  which  H.  J.  Witter  was  admitted  to  a 
partnership  under  the  firm  style  of  Goddard  &  Witter,  which  still  continues.  To 
some  extent  Mr.  Goddard  has  invested  in  real  estate  but  his  attention  is  largely 
concentrated  upon  his  wholesale  fruit  and  commission  interests,  in  which  con- 
nection his  trade  is  constantly  growing,  resulting  from  his  enterprise,  diligence, 
clear  application  and  reliable  business  methods. 

On  the  I4th  of  October,  1909,  in  Toronto,  Ontario,  Mr.  Goddard  was  united 
in  marriage  to  Miss  Mary  E.  Pargeter,  a  daughter  of  James  and  Helen  Pargeter, 
and  they  have  one  son,  James  Andrew.  The  parents  hold  membership  in  St. 
Mark's  church  and  Mr.  Goddard  belongs  also  to  the  Independent  Order  of  Odd 
Fellows,  while  his  political  allegiance  is  given  to  the  conservative  party.  He 
takes  little  active  interest  in  politics,  however,  aside  from  exercising  his  right  of 
franchise,  preferring  to  concentrate  his  energies  upon  his  business  affairs,  with 
the  result  that  industry,  wise  direction  and  executive  control  are  winning  for 
him  growing  prosperity. 


CHARLES  GEORGE  MAJOR. 

All  honor  is  due  to  the  pioneer  settlers  who,  penetrating  into  the  western 
wilderness  in  order  to  enjoy  the  natural  resources  of  the  country  and  establish 
homes,  laid  the  foundation  for  the  present  prosperity  and  greatness  of  the  province. 
Of  this  class  Charles  George  Major  of  New  Westminster  is  a  representative. 
His  name,  however,  figures  in  connection  with  historic  events  in  various  sec- 


CHARLES  G.  MAJOE 


BRITISH    COLUMBIA  159 

tions  and  he  relates  many  interesting  incidents  of  the  early  days  and  of  pioneer 
conditions  as  well  as  of  later-day  progress.  More  than  a  half  century  has  come 
and  gone  since  he  arrived  in  New  Westminster  and  traveled  with  pack  animals 
through  the  mountains  from  the  mines  to  the  market.  There  was  at  that  time 
little  to  break  the  silence  which  brooded  over  the  country  between  camp  and 
settlement  and  little  indication  that  this  district  was  soon  to  become  a  populous 
and  prosperous  region.  His  youth  had  been  passed  in  the  east  but  in  early  man- 
hood he  arrived  in  British  Columbia,  which  has  since  been  the  scene  of  his  labors. 
His  birth  occurred  in  Ontario,  in  1839,  his  parents  being  Richard  and  A.  M. 
(Johnson)  Major,  both  of  whom  were  natives  of  England.  Attracted  by  the  op- 
portunities of  the  new  world,  they  crossed  the  Atlantic  to  America  in  1830  and 
took  tip  their  abode  upon  a  tract  of  land  five  miles  from  Sarnia,  Ontario.  The 
father  followed  both  farming  and  blacksmithing  and  a  life  of  intense  and  well 
directed  activity  brought  him  a  substantial  measure  of  success.  Both  he  and  his 
wife  were  members  of  the  Church  of  England  and  their  lives  were  in  consistent 
harmony  with  their  professions.  The  father  died  at  the  age  of  forty-nine  years, 
while  the  mother,  long  surviving  him,  reached  the  age  of  seventy-six.  Their 
family  numbered  eight  children,  of  whom  only  two  are  now  living. 

At  the  usual  age  Charles  G.  Major  entered  the  public  schools,  which  af- 
forded him  his  entire  educational  opportunities  save  that  in  the  school  of  ex- 
perience he  has  learned  many  valuable  lessons.  He  was  quite  young  when  he 
began  earning  his  own  living  and  he  has  justly  won  the  right  to  be  called  a  self- 
made  man.  For  four  years  he  was  an  apprentice  in  a  dry-goods  business  under 
the  late  Hon.  John  Robson  and  his  brother.  His  contract  called  for  forty 
dollars  in  compensation  for  his  first  year's  service,  sixty  dollars  for  the  sec- 
ond and  one  hundred  dollars  for  the  third  year,  in  addition  to  his  board,  but  his 
employers  recognized  the  fact  that  his  unfaltering  industry,  his  close  application 
and  his  thorough  reliability  merited  a  higher  wage,  which  was  accordingly 
given  him.  In  fact,  the  year  following  the  completion  of  his  apprenticeship 
brought  him  a  larger  salary  than  that  of  any  other  clerk  in  the  store.  With  the 
discovery  of  gold  along  the  Eraser  river  in  1858  attention  was  drawn  to  this  section 
of  the  country  and  many  men,  young  and  old,  flocked  to  the  west,  hoping  to 
rapidly  win  a  fortune  in  search  for  the  precious  metal.  Mr.  Major  was  among 
the  number  and  on  the  1st  of  June,  1859,  reached  New  Westminster,  coming 
here  by  way  of  the  isthmus  of  Panama.  In  1860,  in  company  with  the  late  Hon. 
John  Robson,  he  cleared  a  great  part  of  the  New  Westminster  townsite.  Two 
years  later,  or  in  1862,  he  went  to  the  Cariboo  mines,  remaining  in  that  district 
during  the  years  1862-3-4.  He  was  employed  by  the  express  company,  traveling 
with 'pack  horses,  which  carried  gold  to  the  markets,  and  in  March,  1864,  drove 
the  first  four-horse  stage  through  the  canyons  on  the  Yale-Cariboo  road.  In 
1864  he  returned  to  New  Westminster,  where  he  embarked  in  merchandising 
in  connection  with  John  S.  Clute,  and  when  his  partner  left  British  Columbia  for 
Missouri  in  1870  Mr.  Major  became  sole  proprietor  of  the  business  and  so  con- 
tinued until  1887,  when  he  retired  from  merchandising  and  invested  his  capital 
in  real  estate.  His  operations  in  that  field  have  proven  very  profitable,  for 
his  purchases  have  been  judiciously  made,  after  which  he  has  awaited  favorable 
opportunity  for  sale.  Before  it  was  known  that  Vancouver  was  to  be  the 
terminus  of  the  Canadian  Pacific  Railroad  Mr.  Major  purchased  considerable 
real  estate  there  and  the  rapid  growth  of  the  city  has  been  the  source  of  its  con- 
tinuous rise  in  value.  He  sold  muc.h  property  there  at  a  very  gratifying  figure 
and  he  still  owns  considerable  real  estate  in  Vancouver  as  well  as  in  New  West- 
minster. He  makes  insurance  a  branch  of  his  business  and  besides  he  is  the 
government  administrator  for  the  district  of  New  Westminster,  extending  as  far 
as  North  Bend.  Among  other  interests  Mr.  Major  is  a  director  of  the  New  West- 
minster &  Southern  Railroad  and  of  the  Canadian  Pacific  Lumber  Company.  His 
judgment  in  business  matters  is  sound,  his  discrimination,  keen  and  his  enterprise 
unfaltering,  and  thus  he  has  advanced  year  by  year  until  his  position  in  business 

circles  is  a  most  creditable  one. 
voi  ni — e 


160  BRITISH    COLUMBIA 

Mr.  Major  was  married  in  1867  to  Miss  Mary  Elizabeth  Clarkson,  a  daugh- 
ter of  William  Clarkson,  a  pioneer  settler  of  this  province,  and  a  sister  of  Mrs. 
J.  S.  Clute  and  Mrs.  John  C.  Brown,  pioneer  women  of  British  Columbia.  Mr. 
and  Mrs.  Major  became  the  parents  of  four  children :  Edith  Eleanor,  the  wife  of 
Thomas  Robson  Pearson;  Mildred  Jane,  who  married  John  A.  Lee;  Harry  Clark- 
son;  and  Frank.  In  1903  Mr.  Major  was  called  upon  to  mourn  the  loss  of  his 
wife,  whose  death  was  also  deeply  deplored  by  her  many  friends.  Her  salient 
characteristics  were  such  as  endeared  her  to 'all  with  whom  she  came  in  contact, 
for  she  was  charitable  in  her  opinions,  kindly  in  action  and  generous  in  spirit. 
She  was  a  faithful  member  of  the  Methodist  church,  to  which  Mr.  Major  also 
belongs  and  in  which  he  has  been  an  active  working  member  and  officer  for  half 
a  century. 

Mr.  Major  is  a  charter  member  of  the  Board  of  Trade  of  New  Westminster 
and  in  that  connection  has  done  far-reaching  and  beneficial  work  toward  opening 
new  channels  of  commercial  expansion.  For  the  past  thirty-five  years  he  has 
been  a  member  of  the  Vancouver  Pilot  Board,  doing  much  toward  improving  ship- 
ping facilities  and  creating  a  safe  system  of  pilotage  for  the  port.  He  served  for 
a  number  of  years  as  a  member  of  the  city  council  of  New  Westminster,  ever  giv- 
ing his  support  to  progressive  measures  such  as  were  the  foundation  upon  which 
the  present  greatness  of  the  city  rests.  He  has  also  held  for  twenty  years  the 
position  of  justice  of  the  peace.  His  love  toward  mankind  and  his  compassion 
with  the  unfortunate  or  those  afflicted  with  illness  is  ever  present  with  him 
and  expressed  in  a  visible  way  by  the  diligent  and  effective  work  which  he  accom- 
plishes as  a  member  of  the  board  of  the^ Royal  City  Hospital. 

His  life  has  been  actuated  by  high  and  honorable  principles  and  he  has  never 
deviated  from  a  course  that  he  has  believed  to  be  right  in  all  of  his  relations  with 
his  fellowmen.  He  values  his  own  self-respect  more  than  wealth,  fame  or  posi- 
tion and  the  merited  regard  of  his  fellowmen  is  more  to  him  than  political  advance- 
ment or  honors. 


CHARLES  CAIR  KNIGHT. 

Charles  Cair  Knight  is  the  president  and  general  manager  of  the  Western 
Pacific  Development  Company,  Ltd.,  of  Vancouver.  In  this  connection  his  efforts 
are  an  element  in  general  progress  and  upbuilding  in  the  province.  His  ability  in 
business  affairs  is  widely  acknowledged  and  his  enterprise  is  continually  opening 
before  him  broader  fields  of  activity  and  usefulness.  He  was  born  at  St.  John's 
Newfoundland,  in  November,  1871,  a  son  of  Allan  C.  and  Jessie  E.  (Facey) 
Knight,  also  natives  of  Newfoundland.  After  acquiring  his  education  in  the 
schools  of  his  native  city,  Charles  C.  Knight  became  connected  with  general  mer- 
chandising as  a  representative  of  the  firm  of  Ayre  &  Sons,  of  St.  John's  with  whom 
he  remained  for  seven  years.  He  then  joined  the  St.  John's  branch  of  the  Glas- 
gow firm  of  J.  &  W.  Stewart,  with  whom  he  remained  for  a  little  more  than  a 
year.  In  1894  he  went  west  to  Montreal  and  joined  the  staff  of  the  head  office  of 
the  Sun  Life  Insurance  Company,  remaining  there  for  four  years.  He  was  then 
appointed  cashier  of  the  company,  but  before  assuming  the  duties  of  that  office 
was  tendered  the  field  management  for  the  province  of  Quebec  and  was  stationed 
at  Sherbrooke,  Quebec. 

On  the  expiration  of  that  period  Mr.  Knight  came  to  the  west  and  opened  the 
work  for  the  company  in  the  province  of  Saskatchewan,  with  the  head  provincial 
office  at  Regina.  He  also  established  many  branch  offices  in  the  province  and 
continued  in  charge  there  for  nearly  four  years.  In  the  spring  of  1909  he  came 
to  Vancouver  .and  organized  the  Western  Pacific  Development  Company,  Ltd., 
with  a  capital  of  five  hundred  thousand  dollars.  In  the  spring  of  1911  he  suc- 
ceeded their  first  president,  E.  W.  MacLean,  Esq.,  as  president  and  general 
manager.  This  company  deals  in  the  natural  resources  of  the  western  provinces 


CHAELES  C.  KNIGHT 


BRITISH    COLUMBIA  163 

— in  the  lands,  the  timber,  the  mines  and  in  the  investments  which  are  based  upon 
these  natural  resources,  including  stocks,  bonds,  mortgages  and  business  and 
residential  property.  They  also  have  a  permanent  branch  office  in  London,  Eng- 
land. Well  devised  plans  constitute  the  basis  upon  which  has  been  builded  the 
success  of  the  company.  The  superstructure  has  been  constructed  of  energy, 
determination  and  a  thorough  understanding  of  conditions  and  resources  in  the 
west.  Mr.  Knight  is  a  man  of  indomitable  industry  and  gradually  has  worked  his 
way  upward  until  he  ranks  today  with  the  leading  business  men  of  Vancouver. 
In  Montreal,  in  1895,  occurred  the  marriage  of  Mr.  Knight  and  Miss  Florence 
R.  Spence  and  they  have  one  daughter,  Elsie  Florence.  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Knight 
are  members  of  the  Grand  View  Methodist  church,  in  the  work  of  which  they 
take  a  most  active  and  helpful  part.  Mr.  Knight  is  serving  on  the  quarterly  board, 
the  board  of  trustees  and  is  superintendent  of  the  Sunday  school.  His  wife  also 
has  a  class  in  the  Sunday  school  and  she  is  a  provincial  officer  in  the  Woman's 
Mission  Society,  and  also  in  the  Woman's  Christian  Temperance  Union.  Both 
take  an  active  interest  in  promoting  all  those  offices  which  contribute  to  moral  prog- 
ress and  to  the  upbuilding  of  the  individual,  and  their  influence  is  of  no  restricted 
order.  Mr.  Knight  is  also  well  known  in  political  circles  as  a  supporter  of  the 
liberal  party.  He  contested  the  constituency  of  Sherbrooke  for  the  Dominion 
parliament,  but  was  defeated  by  a  small  majority.  While  in  Saskatchewan  he 
was  president  of  the  Regina  Liberal  Association.  He  is  a  member  of  the  Com- 
mercial and  Progress  Clubs  and  of  the  Young  Men's  Christian  Association.  He 
regards  business  as  but  a  single  phase  of  life  and  not  as  the  end  and  aim  of  exist- 
ence, ever  finding  time  to  devote  to  public  affairs  of  moment,  his  labors  being  an 
element  in  progress,  and  his  practical  efforts  resulting  in  the  attainment  of  high 
ideals. 


EDGAR  H.   BUCKLIN. 

The  term  captain  of  industry  finds  its  justification  in  the  life  record  of  Edgar 
H.  Bucklin,  a  man  who  by  the  sheer  force  of  his  will,  his  ability,  his  foresight 
and  his  initiative  has  built  up  a  mammoth  enterprise  which  has  been  one  of  the 
chief  foundations  upon  which  rests  New  Westminster's  industrial  greatness. 
Capable  of  judging  his  own  capacities  and  the  people  and  circumstances  that 
make  up  his  life  contacts  and  experiences,  he  is  preeminently  a  man  of  business 
sense,  easily  avoiding  the  mistakes  and  disasters  that  come  to  those  who,  although 
possessing  remarkable  faculties  in  some  respects,  are  liable  to  erratic  movements 
that  result  in  unwarranted  risk  and  failure.  Possessing  sufficient  courage  to 
venture  where  favoring  opportunities  lead  the  way,  his  judgment  and  energy  have 
carried  him  forward  to  notable  success,  a  success  which  is  represented  by  the 
important  position  he  occupies  in  the  business  life  of  the  province  as  president 
and  manager  of  The  Small  &  Bucklin  Lumber  Company,  Ltd.,  manufacturers  of 
fir,  cedar  and  spruce.  The  enterprise  furnishes  employment  to  about  two  hun- 
dred and  fifty  men  and  its  annual  output  averages  twenty  million  feet  of  lumber. 
The  company  owns  and  controls  about  thirty  thousand  acres  of  land,  and  the 
quantity  of  timber  available  is  estimated  at  one  billion  feet.  These  statements 
give  but  an  indication  of  the  importance  of  the  business  transacted  and  its  effect 
upon  the  general  growth  and  advancement  of  the  province  and  city. 

Edgar  H.  Bucklin  was  born  April  6,  1860,  in  Illinois,  and  is  a  son  of  George  F. 
and  Esther  Jane  (Hammond)  Bucklin,  both  deceased.  The  former  was  well 
known  in  the  industrial  life  of  New  Hampshire,  in  which  state  he  was  engaged 
as  a  pail  and  lumber  manufacturer.  Both  parents  were  of  English  ancestry.  The 
father,  in  1849,  made  his  way  to  California  with  the  host  of  gold  seekers  in 
company  with  a  Mr.  Holbrook,  a  member  of  the  firm  of  Holbrook,  Merrill  & 
Stetson,  of  San  Francisco,  but  subsequently  returned  eastward,  locating  in 
Swanzey,  New  Hampshire,  where  he  engaged  in  the  manufacture  of  wooden  pails 


164  BRITISH    COLUMBIA 

and  lumber.  The  mother,  who  before  her  marriage  was  Miss  Esther  Jane  Ham- 
mond, was  born  March  17,  1838,  and  comes  of  a  long  line  of  distinguished 
ancestors  who  gained  fame  in  military  service.  Colonel  Allan  Hammond,  her 
father,  was  successively  commissioned  captain,  major  and  colonel  and  the  papers 
of  these  commissions  have  been  in  the  family  for  over  one  hundred  years. 
The  earliest  information  in  regard  to  the  name  of  Hammond  dates  back  about 
three  hundred  and  fifty  years  to  Thomas  Hammond,  of  Tavenham,  in  the  county 
of  Suffolk,  England,  who  was  born  about  1550.  Other  members  of  the  family 
later  made  historic  records  both  in  civil  and  military  life.  On  September  14, 
1645,  Oliver  Cromwell,  the  lord  protector,  made  an  honorable  mention  of  the 
military  achievements  of  Colonel  Robert  Hammond,  speaking  of  the  important 
services  which  the  latter  rendered  in  the  English  army.  This  Colonel  Robert 
Hammond  in  1647  was  governor  of  the  Isle  of  Wight.  Another  Thomas  Ham- 
mond, aide  of  Colonel  Robert  Hammond,  became  later  lieutenant  general  of 
ordnance  and  also  sat  as  the  king's  judge,  being  in  good  repute  with  King 
Charles  I.  In  a  letter  from  Oliver  Cromwell  to  Robert  Hammond,  dated  April  6, 
1648,  the  lord  protector  expresses  himself  highly  satisfied  with  the  labors  which 
the  Colonel  had  performed  and  in  a  half  humorous  way  informs  him  that  his 
services  at  the  rate  of  ten  pounds  per  week  are  closed  but  that  he  is  reengaged  at 
the  rate  of  twenty  pounds  and  that  a  salary  of  one  thousand  pounds  per  annum 
is  given  him.  Oliver  Cromwell  also  informs  Mr.  Hammond  that  an  order  has 
been  given  to  Mr.  Lilse  to  draw  up  an  ordinance  providing  for  five  hundred 
pounds  per  year  to  be  settled  upon  him  and  his  heirs.  In  taking  into  considera- 
tion the  much  greater  value  of  money  at  that  time,  it  is  evident  from  these 
figures  that  the  services  of  Colonel  Hammond  must  have  been  of  an  extraordi- 
narily valuable  kind.  Senator  James  Bucklin,  of  Colorado,  who  now  makes  his 
home  at  Grand  Junction,  that  state,  is  an  uncle  of  our  subject,  and  was  one  of 
those  appointed  to  investigate  the  Australian  ballot,  which  on  his  recommendation 
was  adopted.  It  was  also  interesting  to  record  that  all  the  characters  in  the  play 
"The  Old  Homestead,"  by  Denman  Thompson,  are  members  of  the  Bucklin 
family  and  relatives  of  our  subject,  and  Otis  Whitcomb,  the  leading  character 
in  the  play,  is  portraited  after  his  cousin. 

Edgar  H.  Bucklin  enjoyed  the  advantages  of  a  thorough  and  specialized 
education  and  preparing  in  1877  at  Buchtel  College  of  Akron,  Ohio,  he  graduated 
in  1882  from  the  College  of  Law  of  Chicago  University.  For  several  years  he 
was  a  member  of  the  Cook  county  (111.)  bar,  practicing  in  Chicago  as  a  partner  of 
the  firm  of  Hutchinson  &  Partridge.  He  engaged  later  in  the  manufacture  of  salt, 
building  plants  in  Warsaw,  Pavilion  and  Ithaca,  New  York,  and  Hutchinson, 
Kansas,  having  a  combined  capacity  of  eighteen  hundred  barrels  per  day. 
These  various  concerns  were  known  as  the  Hawley  Salt  Company  of  Warsaw, 
the  Ithaca  Salt  Company  of  Ithaca  and  the  Pavilion  Salt  Company  of  Pavilion, 
all  of  New  York,  and  the  Wyoming  Salt  Company  of  Hutchinson,  Kansas,  the 
first  enterprise  of  that  kind  in  the  state.  All  of  these  factories  were  subsequently, 
in  1899,  purchased  by  the  National  Salt  Company.  While  residing  in  New 
York  Mr.  Bucklin  also  took  interest  in  affairs  of  public  importance  and  was 
chosen  as  member  of  the  committee  to  advocate  a  barge  canal  throughout  the 
state  before  the  governor  and  the  legislature;  also  serving  as  member  of  the 
board  of  health  at  Ithaca. 

The  year  1903  marks  the  advent  of  Mr.  Bucklin  in  British  Columbia,  where 
he  engaged  in  the  lumber  industry,  being  instrumental  in  forming  The  Small  & 
Bucklin  Lumber  Company,  Ltd.,  which  is  largely  composed  of  his  former  asso- 
ciates in  the  salt  manufacturing  business.  Mr.  Bucklin  is  one  of  the  principal 
owners  of  this  concern  and  president  and  manager,  and  such  is  his  success  that 
his  methods  are  of  interest  to  the  commercial  world.  He  also  is  Canadian 
director  of  the  Lumbermen's  Indemnity  Exchange  of  Seattle.  Washington,  a 
lumbermen's  mutual  insurance  company,  with  one  hundred  and  sixty  members, 
carrying  the  insurance  of  the  principal  lumber  plants  in  California,  Oregon,  Wash- 
ington, Idaho  and  British  Columbia.  In  1904,  after  acquiring  about  thirty  thou- 


BRITISH    COLUMBIA  165 

sand  acres  of  timber  land,  the  available  quantity  being  about  one  billion  feet,  Mr. 
Bucklin  selected  a  site  for  a  "sawmill  in  New  Westminster,  on  Dock  Square, 
which  was  then  a  swamp.  He  immediately  began  there  the  erection  of  the 
present  plant  of  The  Small  &  Bucklin  Lumber  Company,  which  in  their  mill  and 
camps  now  employ  about  two  hundred  and  fifty  men,  with  an  annual  pay  roll 
of  about  two  hundred  thousand  dollars,  cutting  about  twenty  million  feet  of 
lumber  per  year. 

In  1882  Air.  Bucklin  married  Miss  Carrie  H.  Hawley,  of  Warsaw,  New  York, 
and  their  children  are  Waldo  F.  H.,  Esther  H.  and  Lucy  H.  The  son  is  now 
ably  assisting  his  father  in  his  extensive  business  interests,  holding  the  position 
of  secretary-treasurer  of  The  Small  &  Bucklin  Lumber  Company  and  also  acting 
as  assistant  manager.  The  fraternal  affiliations  of  Mr.  Bucklin  are  confined  to 
the  Masons,  in  which  order  he  holds  membership  with  Ithaca  Lodge,  A.  F.  & 
A.  M.,  of  Ithaca,  New  York. 

Every  force  that  has  gone  to  make  New  Westminster  an  ideal  city,  every 
movement  for  its  commercial  expansion,  every  effort  to  uphold  its  intellectual 
and  moral  standards  has  received  the  indorsement  of  Mr.  Bucklin,  all  of  whose 
actions  bespeak  a  sincerely  purposeful,  public-spirited  citizenship.  To  make  his 
native  talents  subserve  the  demands  of  the  social  and  business  conditions  of  the 
day  is  the  ambition  of  his  life  and  the  ultimate  purpose  of  his  work  and  he 
stands  today  as  a  splendid  representative  of  the  business  man  to  whom  personal 
prosperity  is  but  one  aim,  secondary  in  importance  to  the  public  growth  and 
development  and  less  vital  than  many  other  elements  which  go  to  make  up 
human  existence. 


WILLIAM  THOMPSON  HUNTER. 

A  valuable  element  was  added  to  the  productive  enterprise  of  Vancouver  in 
the  establishment  of  the  Empress  Manufacturing  Company,  Ltd.,  of  which  Wil- 
liam Thompson  Hunter  is  president.  He  belongs  to  that  class  of  representative 
men  whose  success  is  attributable  to  their  own  labors,  for  since  leaving  school 
and  starting  out  in  life  practically  empty-handed,  he  has  gradually  worked  his 
way  upward  and  is  now  at  the  head  of  one  of  the  important  business  interests  of 
Vancouver.  He  was  born  in  Woodstock,  Ontario,  November  27,  1860,  and  is  a 
son  of  John  B.  and  Deborah  Hunter,  the  former  of  Scotch  and  the  latter  of 
English  descent.  Both  are  deceased. 

In  the  public  and  high  schools  of  his  native  city  William  Thompson  Hunter 
pursued  his  education  and  on  leaving  school  went  to  the  United  States,  where 
he  was  engaged  in  merchandising  from  1883  until  1898.  He  was  also  connected 
with  agricultural  interests  at  Wheatland,  North  Dakota,  and  through  the  careful 
direction  of  his  farming  and  commercial  interests  met  with  substantial  success. 
In  1898  he  arrived  in  British  Columbia  and  followed  general  merchandising  in 
Greenwood  for  eleven  years  or  until  1909,  when  he  sought  the  broader  field  of 
labor  offered  in  Vancouver  and  came  to  this  city.  Here  he  purchased  the 
Empress  Manufacturing  Company,  Ltd.,  of  which  he  has  since  been  the  president. 
This  company  are  importers  of  tea,  coffee  and  spices  and  are  also  extensively 
engaged  in  the  manufacture  of  jams,  jellies,  jelly  powders,  extracts,  pickles, 
sauces,  catsup,  etc.  The  business  has  grown  continuously  from  the  outset,  owing 
to  the  excellence  of  its  products,  its  reliable  business  methods  and  the  promptness 
with  which  orders  are  filled.  Its  trade  relations  are  reaching  out  along  ramifying 
lines  and  the  business  of  the  house  now  covers  a  wide  territory. 

In  1881,  in  Fargo,  North  Dakota,  Mr.  Hunter  was  united  in  marriage  to  Miss 
Elizabeth  Anderson,  a  daughter  of  Robert  Anderson,  and  they  have  six  sons,  one 
of  whom  is  now  married.  Mr.  Hunter  enjoys  hunting  as  a  recreation  and  when 
leisure  allows  indulges  in  that  sport.  He  votes  with  the  conservative  party,  is 
a  believer  in  the  faith  of  the  Presbyterian  church  and  is  a  member  of  the  Ter- 


166  BRITISH    COLUMBIA 

minal  City  Club.  Public  opinion  places  him  with  the  representative  business  men 
and  manufacturers  of  Vancouver  and  accords  him  the  respect  which  is  ever 
given  those  whose  success  has  been  honorably  and  worthily  won. 


ARTHUR  CANBY  BRYDON  JACK. 

An  eminent  representative  of  the  profession  which  has  ever  been  regarded  as 
the  conservator  of  human  rights  and  liberty  and  the  safeguard  of  organized  gov- 
ernment, Arthur  Canby  Brydon  Jack  has  practiced  continuously  in  British  Colum- 
bia since  1889.  Other  interests  as  well  have  profited  by  his  activity  and  sound 
business  judgment,  his  name  being  especially  well  known  in  financial  circles. 
Mr.  Brydon  Jack  was  born  at  Fredericton,  New  Brunswick,  September  10,  1864, 
a  son  of  Dr.  William  and  Caroline  (Disbrow)  Brydon  Jack.  The  former,  a  native 
of  Scotland,  became  a  resident  of  New  Brunswick  in  early  manhood  and  figured 
prominently  for  many  decades  in  connection  with  the  educational  progress  of  the 
province,  being  for  forty  years  president  of  the  University  at  Fredericton.  He 
retired  a  few  months  prior  to  his  death,  which  occurred  in  1886  when  he  was 
sixty-seven  years  of  age.  His  wife,  who  was  descended  from  United  Empire 
Loyalist  ancestry,  died  at  St.  John  in  1910. 

After  attending  the  public  schools  of  Fredericton,  Arthur  Canby  Brydon  Jack 
matriculated  in  the  University  of  New  Brunswick,  from  which  he  was  graduated 

B.  A.  in  1883,  while  in  1884  he  received  the  honorary  degree  of  M.  A.    He  also 
received  a  scholarship  for  leading  his  classes  in  mathematics  and  French.     He 
then  studied  law  at  Fredericton  and  also  spent  a  year  in  the  Boston  Law  School. 
In  1888  he  was  called  to  the  bar  of  New  Brunswick  and  immediately  afterward 
came  to  British  Columbia.    The  following  year,  or  in  July,  1889,  he  was  admitted 
in  practice  here  and  was  an  active  representative  of  the  bar  at  New  Westminster 
until  1895,  when  he  came  to  Vancouver,  where  he  has  since  followed  his  pro- 
fession.   For  the  past  four  years  he  has  been  associated  with  Mr.  Woods  under  the 
name  of  Brydon  Jack  &  Woods.     Aside  from  his  private  practice,  in  the  years 
1899  and  1900  he  had  charge  of  the  prosecution  of  all  criminal  cases  in  Vancouver 
for  the  crown  except  the  assizes  trials.    In  1903  he  organized  the  Dominion  Trust 
Company,  which  was  incorporated  in  1904  with  a  capital  of  twenty  thousand  dol- 
lars, and  something  of  the  success  of  this  important  financial  enterprise  is  indi- 
cated by  the  fact  that  the  present  capital  is  five  millions,  of  which  two  million,  five 
hundred  thousand  dollars  are  fully  subscribed  and  two  millions  paid  up.    Since  the 
organization   of   this   company   Mr.    Brydon   Jack   has   been   its   solicitor.      His 
brother,  Dr.  W.  D.  Brydon  Jack,  is  vice  president  of  the  company  and  his  nephew, 

C.  B.  Brydon  Jack,  is  manager  of  the  Vancouver  office,  which  is  the  head  office  of 
this  company.     Branches,  however,  have  been  established  in  British  Columbia, 
Alberta,  Manitoba,  Ontario,  Quebec,  London,  England,  and  Antwerp,  Belgium. 

His  practice  and  his  connection  with  the  Dominion  Trust  Company  do  not 
comprise  the  extent  of  Mr.  Brydon  Jack's  activities.  Important  as  they  are  he 
finds  opportunity  for  cooperation  along  other  lines.  He  secured  the  charter  for 
and  is  a  life  member  of  the  Vancouver  Exhibition  Association,  which  was  organ- 
ized in  1908  for  the  advancement  of  agricultural  and  horticultural  interests  in  the 
county  of  Vancouver  and  now  has  two  hundred  and  thirty  life  members  and  eight 
hundred  annual  members.  It  has  been  a  potent  force  in  accomplishing  the  object 
for  which  it  was  formed,  stimulating  ambition  among  the  farmers  and  fruit- 
growers of  the  northwest. 

On  the  3d  of  September,  1899,  in  Vancouver,  Mr.  Brydon  Jack  was  married 
to  Miss  Vera  H.  Vaughan,  a  daughter  of  William  Vaughan,  who,  now  retired,  is 
residing  in  Vancouver,  but  was  formerly  engaged  in  the  ship-building  business  in 
New  Brunswick.  The  two  children  of  this  marriage  are  Muriel  and  Vaughan, 
twins.  Mr.  Brydon  Jack  is  a  liberal  in  politics  and  has  served  on  many  committees 
of  his  party,  seeking  ever  to  promote  its  success  and  development,  but  he  has  never 


ARTHUR  C.  BRYDON  JACK 


BRITISH    COLUMBIA  169 

been  a  candidate  for  office.  While  in  college  he  was  most  successful  in  athletics, 
winning  many  prizes  at  running  and  jumping.  The  principal  source  of  his  recre- 
ation now  is  motoring  and  yachting.  He  is  prominent  and  popular  in  various 
clubs,  holding  membership  in  the  Vancouver  Auto,  the  Royal  Vancouver  Yacht, 
the  Chess  and  the  Press  Clubs,  and  he  is  also  a  member  of  St.  John's  Presbyterian 
church.  His  life  work  in  its  various  phases  may  be  summed  up  in  the  term  "suc- 
cessful accomplishment."  He  never  stopped  short  of  the  achievement  of  his  pur- 
pose, whether  in  the  path  of  his  profession,  in  his  business  affairs  or  in  the  projects 
for  the  public  good,  if  the  result  could  be  achieved  by  persistent  and  honorable 
effort.  With  him  to  see  an  opportunity  for  advancement  is  to  utilize  it  and  thus 
he  has  reached  the  position  which  he  now  occupies  as  one  of  Vancouver's  leading 
barristers. 


JAMES  MACAULAY. 

The  history  of  any  country  is  but  an  epitome  of  the  lives  of  the  citizens  who 
have  made  it.  The  influence  of  a  life  is  felt,  if  not  openly  manifested,  for 
generations  after  the  life  itself  has  ended.  Indelibly  imprinted  on  the  business, 
civic  and  social  growth  of  British  Columbia  is  the  progressive,  stalwart  character 
of  the  older  business  men,  that  intrepid  band  of  hardy  pioneers  who  bravely 
endured  countless  privations,  carried  civilization  further  westward  and  laid  so 
well  on  the  Pacific  slope,  the  foundation  of  this,  destined  to  be,  greatest  of  the 
Canadian  provinces. 

Of  all  the  various  nationalities  represented  in  the  cosmopolitan  growth  of 
British  Columbia  none  has  left  its  imprint  for  general  good,  beneficent  laws  and 
upright  living,  more  clearly  defined  than  has  the  sturdy  Scot.  Prominent  among 
the  latter  is  the  family  of  which  the  subject  of  this  sketch  is  the  head. 

James  Macaulay  was  born  at  Colombo,  Ceylon,  on  the  loth  day  of  January, 
1853,  a  son  of  Daniel  and  Mary  (McFarlane)  Macaulay,  residents  of  Glasgow, 
Scotland,  to  which  city  they  later  returned.  The  father  died  when  James  was 
but  fourteen  years  of  age  and  nine  years  later  the  mother  passed  from  earth. 
They  were  the  parents  of  two  children.  By  the  death  of  his  father  the  imme- 
diate need  of  self-support  was  forced  upon  James  Macaulay  and  he  entered  the  em- 
ploy of  Hewitt  &  Wingate,  calico  printers  with  whom  he  began  learning  the  busi- 
ness of  calico  printing,  beginning  to  work  in  December,  1867,  at  their  Glasgow 
plant.  His  first  compensation  was  but  ten  pounds  per  year,  a  sum  quite  in  contrast 
with  the  pay  of  the  youth  of  today.  At  the  end  of  seven  years,  having  proved 
proficient  at  the  work,  he  was  transferred  to  Manchester,  England,  where  the 
company  had  a  branch  business.  After  some  time  in  Manchester  he  left  the 
employ  of  Hewitt  &  Wingate  and  became  connected  with  the  firm  of  George  & 
R.  Dewhurst,  extensive  manufacturers  and  exporters,  and  remained  with  them 
until  August,  1882.  On  August  loth  of  that  year  he  sailed  for  the  new  world 
with  a  party  of  nine  acquaintances.  Landing  at  Montreal  they  came,  via  Detroit, 
Chicago  and  St.  Paul,  to  Winnipeg.  The  little  band  of  friends  soon  moved  on 
to  Brandon,  Manitoba,  where  each  took  up  a  homestead  some  distance  south  of 
the  town  of  Whitewood.  Not  long  after  arriving  there  Mr.  Macaulay,  with 
several  others,  formed  a  partnership  to  conduct  a  general  merchandise  business 
under  the  name  of  Charles  Marshallsay  &  Company,  but  as  the  severe  Manitoba 
weather  had  come  on,  they  could  not  successfully  start  the  business  and,  resolving 
to  await  the  coming  of  spring,  they  returned  to  Brandon. 

The  need  of  money  was  ever  present  and  Mr.  Macaulay,  with  his  natural 
resourcefulness  and  keenness  to  see  and  grasp  an  opportunity,  earned  his  first 
money  in  Canada  by  compiling  and  publishing  a  directory  of  Brandon,  the  first 
it  had  ever  had.  The  venture  was  a  success  for  the  people  welcomed  the  new 
publication  and  readily  purchased  it.  A  copy  of  this  book  is  still  in  the  posses- 
sion of  Mr.  Macaulay,  there  being  few,  if  any,  other  copies  in  existence,  and  a 
glance  at  its  pages  shows  many  names  of  the  then  Brandon  citizens  who  are 


170  BRITISH    COLUMBIA 

today  prominent  business  men  of  Vancouver.  The  following  spring  he  returned 
to  Whitewood  where,  with  his  partners,  he  established  the  general  store  and  the 
business  was  successfully  conducted  until  1890. 

A  series  of  bad  years  and  general  crop  failures  had  fallen  upon  that  section 
of  Canada  which  prompted  a  desire  to  cross  the  mountains  into  the  newer,  milder 
and  much  talked  of  country  of  British  Columbia  and  Mr.  Macaulay  reached 
Vancouver  in  1890.  Immediately  after  his  arrival  here  he  engaged  in  the  whole- 
sale provision  and  general  commission  business  in  partnership  with  W.  E.  Knowl- 
er  under  the  firm  name  of  Knowler  &  Macaulay  which  association  has  con- 
tinued uninterruptedly  to  the  present  time.  It  may  be  remarked  that  this  is  the 
only  firm  in  Vancouver,  engaged  in  that  line  of  business,  that  has,  at  this  date, 
1913,  been  so  long  continued  without  change.  The  business  changed  in  some 
details  and  enlarged,  as  the  years  went  by,  a  feature  dropped  here  and  another 
added  there  until  it  has  expanded  into  the  big  business  of  today.  The  firm 
became  contractors  for  the  Canadian  Pacific  Railway  under  the  name  of  Knowler 
&  Macaulay  C.  P.  R.  Boarding  Masters  and  they  supply  the  equipment  and  cooked 
foods  for  the  maintenance  of  the  gangs  of  laborers  along  the  line  of  road.  At 
the  present  time  this  branch  of  their  business  employs  more  than  one  hundred 
stewards  and  cooks.  They  maintain  offices  at  Nelson  and  Revelstoke  as  well 
as  at  Vancouver.  Of  the  original  wholesale  grocery  and  candy  business  there 
now  remains  but  the  agency  for  the  wholesale  handling  and  distribution  for  all 
of  British  Columbia  of  the  high-class  chocolates  of  Ganong  Brothers,  of  St. 
Stephens,  New  Brunswick,  in  which  small  town  the  latter  firm  has  a  large  factory. 

Mr.  Macaulay  was  united  in  marriage  at  Cheshire,  England,  with  Miss 
Catherine  Higginbottom,  a  daughter  of  Bradford  Higginbottom  of  the  Stines 
Printing  Company  of  England.  Of  this  union  but  one  child,  a  daughter,  Dorothy, 
has  been  born. 

Mr.  and  Mrs.  Macaulay  have  both  been  active  in  the  upbuilding  of  British 
Columbia,  not  only  along  business  lines,  but  as  well  in  those  things  which  have 
made  for  the  social  and  physical  uplift  of  the  community  and  the  advancement 
of  art  and  science.  Mrs.  Macaulay  has  been  an  earnest  and  constant  worker  in 
the  various  women's  societies  of  the  province  and  Mr.  Macaulay,  while  active 
with  the  affairs  of  business,  has  always  extended  his  sympathy,  encouragement 
and  aid  to  the  various  causes  in  which  she  may  have  been  laboring.  The  moan 
of  the  sick  and  the  plaintive  cry  of  the  orphan  always  found  a  responsive  chord 
in  their  hearts  and  Mrs.  Macaulay  may  be  mentioned  as  one  of  the  founders  of 
the  Victorian  Order  of  Nurses  and  the  present  president  of  that  society,  in  the 
work  of  which  she  is  ably  assisted  by  her  daughter,  Dorothy.  She  has  also  been 
one  of  the  directors  of  the  Alexandra  Orphanage  since  its  inception.  She  is 
vice  president  of  the  National  Council  of  Women  for  British  Columbia,  is  greatly 
interested  in  the  Needlework  Guild  and  has  been  a  member  of  the  board  of  the 
Art  Historical  Society  since  its  organization. 

Mr.  Macaulay  is  a  lover  of  home  and  home  life.  He  belongs  to  no  clubs,  his 
evenings  are  spent  by  his  own  fireside  with  his  loved  ones.  A  member  of  the 
Congregational  church,  his  influence  has  always  been  on  the  side  of  better  morals, 
better  laws  and  a  better  people.  Such  lives  may  be  called  successful  for  success 
is  not  measured  alone  by  the  balance  of  a  ledger  but  by  the  example  which  lives 
and  puts  its  imprint  on  the  generations  yet  to  be. 


THOMAS  ELLIS  LADNER. 

A  detailed  record  of  the  life  of  Thomas  Ellis  Ladner  would  present  an  accur- 
ate and  comprehensive  picture  of  many  phases  of  pioneer  life  in  the  west,  for  he 
has  been  closely  associated  with  the  development,  improvement  and  transforma- 
tion of  this  section  of  the  country  from  early  pioneer  times.  He  has  now  reached 
the  ripe  old  age  of  seventy-seven  years  but  is  still  hale  and  active  and  relates  in 


THOMAS  E.  LADNER 


BRITISH    COLUMBIA  173 

interesting  manner  many  anecdotes  of  the  early  days.  He  was  born  at  Trenant 
Park,  Cornwall,  England,  September  8,  1836,  a  son  of  Edward  and  Sarah  (Ellis) 
Ladner,  who  were  also  natives  of  Cornwall.  The  father  was  a  farmer  by  occupa- 
tion and  in  1847  came  to  America  with  his  eldest  son,  William  H.  Ladner,  and 
a  daughter.  They  made  their  way  to  the  state  of  Wisconsin,  where  the  father 
spent  his  remaining  days.  In  1851  the  son  William  returned  to  England  to  bring 
over  the  mother  and  remainder  of  the  family.  Owing  to  a  condition  of  English 
law  which  would  prevent  the  wife  and  mother  drawing  an  annuity  which  was  hers 
and  which  she  would  lose  by  leaving  England,  she  decided  to  remain  for  a  time, 
while  the  sons,  William  and  Thomas,  started  for  America.  There  were  six  chil- 
dren in  the  family  and  the  others  were :  Mrs.  Hugh  Phillips,  of  Mineral  Point, 
Wisconsin;  Mrs.  W.  J.  Armstrong,  of  New  Westminster;  and  Mrs.  James  Phil- 
lips, deceased ;  and  Salina,  deceased.  The  brother  William,  who  for  many  years 
resided  at  Ladner,  has  also  passed  away. 

The  two  brothers,  William  and  Thomas  Ladner,  started  with  a  party  of  emi- 
grants from  Wisconsin  across  the  plains,  making  the  journey  with  ox  teams  and 
prairie  schooners,  the  trip  covering  the  period  from  March  to  September,  1852. 
The  Indians  occasioned  them  considerable  trouble  by  stealing  all  of  their  stock- 
save  their  horses.  Other  emigrants  met  them  en  route,  joined  the  party  and 
trailed  the  Indians  to  the  Platte  river  in  western  Nebraska,  where  they  found  the 
stock,  while  the  Indians  fled.  The  city  of  Omaha,  Nebraska,  was  then  but  a 
Catholic  mission.  There  was  so  much  traffic  for  the  ferry  at  that  point  that  they 
waited  a  month  for  their  turn  to  cross  the  Missouri  river  and  when  they  had 
reached  the  other  side  they  found  an  Indian  with  a  pole  across  the  road,  collect- 
ing five  dollars  from  each  party  for  the  privilege  of  letting  them  pass  through 
his  country.  The  journey  was  resumed  and  at  length  they  arrived  at  Salt  Lake 
City,  where  they  remained  for  eleven  days  to  recruit,  camping  out  eleven  miles 
from  the  city.  While  there  they  helped  the  Mormon  farmers  to  put  up  their  grain, 
for  which  service  they  would  not  receive  pay,  but  instead  were  given  a  ball  and 
entertainment.  They  then  pressed  on  to  the  coast.  Mr.  Ladner  and  his  brother 
engaged  in  mining  in  Grass  Valley,  California,  with  good  results,  remaining  there 
until  gold  was  discovered  on  the  Eraser  river  in  British  Columbia,  at  which  time 
they  came  to  the  province.  This  was  in  1858.  They  remained  at  Fort  Hope  for  a 
time  and  in  1861  secured  a  pack  train  of  mules  and  packed  goods  for  the  miners 
at  Cariboo  in  that  and  the  following  year.  It  took  two  days  to  make  the  trip  from 
Yale  to  North  Bend,  a  distance  of  twenty  miles  over  the  mountains.  The  gov- 
ernment then  built  a  mule  trail  through  the  canyon  and  later  a  wagon  road  and 
erected  the  suspension  bridge  at  Chapman  Bar,  near  Spuzzum.  At  length  the 
brothers  sold  their  pack  trains  and  went  to  the  delta  of  the  Eraser,  settling  about 
six  miles  above  the  mouth  of  the  river,  where  they  began  farming.  There  was  not 
an  inhabitant  of  that  district  up  to  that  time,  the  Ladners  being  the  first  white  set- 
tlers in  that  region.  Every  evidence  of  pioneer  life  was  to  be  found  there,  the 
country  being  entirely  wild  and  undeveloped.  John  Clute,  a  well  known  resident 
of  New  Westminster,  would  jokingly  tell  that  "the  sturgeon  used  to  come  up  into 
the  fields  and  eat  the  cabbage."  The  brothers  engaged  in  farming  in  pioneer  times, 
there  carrying  on  agricultural  pursuits  extensively  as  time  passed  on,  having 
acquired  twelve  hundred  acres  of  prairie  land  and  upon  this  place  Mr.  Ladner 
had  large  herds  of  thoroughbred  cattle,  which  he  imported  into  this  country  from 
Oregon.  Eventually,  however,  Mr.  Ladner  became  interested  in  the  fish  canning 
business.  As  settlement  was  made  in  the  district,  attention  of  enterprising  men 
was  drawn  to  the  fact  that  a  profitable  business  of  that  kind  might  be  conducted 
and  canneries  were  established  on  the  Eraser  river,  on  the  Skeena  river  and  also  on 
Rivers  Inlet.  The  first  cannery  on  the  lower  Eraser  river  was  built  at  Ladner 
by  the  Delta  Canning  Company,  of  which  Mr.  Ladner  was  the  owner.  Later  the 
company  acquired  the  Harlock,  Standard,  Wellington,  Laidlaw,  and  three  other 
fisheries,  all  of  which  were  merged  into  one  company,  which  afterward  became 
The  Victoria  Canning  Company,  of  which  Mr.  Ladner  was  general  manager,  oper- 
ating all  the  canneries.  It  was  in  1887  that  he  entered  into  partnership  with  J.  A. 


174  BRITISH    COLUMBIA 

Laidlaw,  Donald  Chisholm,  Frank  Page  and  Joseph  Lyon,  all  now  deceased,  to 
build  the  Delta  cannery  at  Ladner's  Landing,  now  called  Ladner.  This  was  the 
first  important  cannery  below  New  Westminster  and  had  a  capacity  of  thirty 
thousand  cases  of  salmon  per  season.  He  also  became  a  partner  with  F.  Page 
and  others  in  the  purchase  of  the  cannery  of  the  Wellington  Packing  Company 
at  Canoe  Pass  on  the  Fraser  river,  of  which  he  was  made  manager  and  which  had 
a  capacity  of  twenty-five  thousand  cases  per  season.  For  a  long  period  Mr.  Lad- 
ner figured  prominently  in  connection  with  the  canning  industry.  The  business 
done  amounted  to  several  million  dollars  annually.  At  one  time  while  he  was 
manager  of  the  Delta,  cannery  he  had  seventy-five  thousand  salmon  on  the  dock 
and  in  scows  as  a  single  night's  catch.  In  those  days  the  work  of  handling  and 
preserving  was  all  done  by  hand,  for  the  "iron  chink  had  not  yet  been  invented. 
To  preserve  this  unusual  catch,  they  had  to  be  partly  salted.  He  hired  every  avail- 
able thing  into  which  to  pack  them,  even  getting  Indian  canoes.  The  great  catches 
of  salmon  of  those  early  days  are  seen  no  more,  as  the  modern  traps  are  depleting 
the  supply,  and  unless  prompt  action  is  taken,  the  salmon  in  the  Fraser  will  be  like 
the  buffalo — extinct.  When  the  amalgamation  of  the  canneries  into  the  British 
Columbia  Packers  Association  was  consummated,  Mr.  Ladner  withdrew  from  the 
business,  on  account  of  ill  health  and  had  to  retire,  and  for  fifteen  years  he  was  a 
sufferer,  when  an  operation  eventually  restored  him  to  health.  He  has  been  inter- 
ested in  many  other  industries,  throughout  British  Columbia  aside  from  canning 
and  from  agricultural  pursuits.  He  is  a  director  in  the  British  Columbia  Life  In- 
surance Company  and  now  its  vice  president.  He  is  also  president  of  the  Ladner 
Trust  &  Investment  Company ;  a  director  of  the  Coast  Shale  Brick  Company ;  and 
president  of  Lantzius  &  Ladner,  Limited,  wholesale  importers  and  exporters. 

In  1865  Mr.  Ladner  was  united  in  marriage  to  Miss  Edna  Booth,  a  daughter  of 
William  Booth,  Esq.,  of  Victoria.  Mrs.  Ladner  passed  away  in  January,  1882. 
They  became  the  parents  of  three  children:  Mary,  the  widow  of  Frank  L.  Lord, 
of  Vancouver;  Edward,  of  Ladner;  and  Thomas  Ellis,  of  Vancouver.  In  1884 
Mr.  Ladner  wedded  Miss  Minnie  E.  Parr,  a  daughter  of  William  Johnson  Parr, 
of  Los  Gatos,  California,  and  of  this  marriage  were  born  three  children :  Leon  J., 
a  barrister  and  solicitor  of  Vancouver,  practicing  as  a  member  of  the  firm  of  Lad- 
ner &  Cantalon;  Alice  P.,  the  wife  of  Dr.  G.  C.  Draeseke,  of  Vancouver;  and  Vio- 
let, the  wife  of  Dr.  S.  B.  Peele,  of  Vancouver.  There  is  also  an  adopted  daughter, 
Pearl,  who  has  made  her  home  with  them  from  infancy. 

Mr.  Ladner  is  a  conservative  in  his  political  views,  supporting  the  men  and 
measures  of  the  party  through  the  exercise  of  his  right  of  franchise,  but  he  never 
seeks  office.  He  is  a  man  five  feet  and  eight  inches  in  height  and  his  weight  is  about 
one  hundred  and  eighty  pounds.  He  is  fond  of  riding,  driving  and  fishing,  which 
constitute  his  principal  sources  of  recreation.  He  gave  evidence  of  his  patriotic 
spirit  by  serving  as  lieutenant  of  the  home  guards  in  New  Westminster  during  the 
Fenian  raid.  The  west  knows  him  as  one  of  its  worthy  and  honored  pioneer  set- 
tlers and  one  who  has  taken  active  and  helpful  part  in  promoting  public  progress, 
especially  along  the  line  of  material  development.  He  has  lived  to  see  remarkable 
changes  in  this  section  of  the  country  as  pioneer  conditions  have  given  way  before 
advancing  civilization,  and  his  name  is  inseparably  linked  with  the  history  of  this 
region. 

A.  EDWARD  TULK. 

A.  Edward  Tulk,  barrister  and  capitalist,  and  having  extensive  commercial  in- 
terests in  Vancouver  and  throughout  British  Columbia,  and  who  is  also  widely 
known  in  connection  with  the  leading  sports  which  most  engross  public  interest, 
has  had  a  most  interesting  and  successful  career. 

Born  in  Hamilton,  Ontario,  on  Christmas,  December  25,  1879,  second  son 
of  John  J.  and  Mary  Margaret  (McAndrew)  Tulk,  natives  of  England  and 


A.  EDWARD  TULK 


BRITISH    COLUMBIA  177 

Ontario  respectively,  Mr.  Tulk  at  the  usual  age  became  a  pupil  in  the  public 
schools  of  Hamilton,  passing  through  the  consecutive  grades  until  he  became  a 
high-school  student,  having  the  option  of  a  collegiate  institute  training  or  enter- 
ing upon  the  commercial  course  instituted  by  the  provincial  government  of  On- 
tario. Mr.  Tulk  selected  the  latter,  and  in  1891,  at  the  age  of  twelve  years, 
received  the  highest  diploma  for  general  proficiency  in  commercial  training. 

The  next  two  years  were  spent  by  Mr.  Tulk  in  the  office  of  the  Standard  Life 
Assurance  Company,  and  the  following  five  years  in  the  grocery  and  liquor 
firm  of  the  Charles  Bremner  Company. 

In  the  spring  of  1898  Mr.  Tulk  became  identified  with  Vancouver  and  Brit- 
ish Columbia,  engaging  in  general  trading  on  Stikine  river  and  in  the  Cassiar 
district  in  the  northern  part  of  the  province,  first  in  Glenora  under  the  firm  name 
of  Curtis  &  Tulk,  which  was  succeeded  by  Tulk  &  Forrest  and  in  Telegraph 
Creek  in  the  winter  of  1899,  and  in  the  spring  of  1899  we  find  Mr.  Tulk  the  only 
member  of  his  firm. 

In  the  summer  of  1899  Mr  Tulk  purchased  the  controlling  interest  in  the 
Excelsior  Steam  Laundry  in  Vancouver,  disposing  of  this  interest  in  the  fall. 
On  November  i,  1899,  he  organized  the  Gold  Seal  Liquor  Company,  Limited, 
becoming  president  of  that  and  associated  companies  engaged  in  a  general  im- 
portation and  distribution  of  the  products  of  Great  Britain,  France,  Germany, 
Italy  and  California,  building  up  and  conducting  one  of  the  most  extensive  dis- 
tributing businesses  in  Canada. 

Retiring  from  the  management  and  control  of  his  commercial  interests  in 
June,  1907,  in  Vancouver  Mr.  Tulk  passed  the  matriculation  examination  of 
McGill  University,  and  in  September  of  the  same  year  in  Montreal  became  a 
student  in  law,  graduating  with  first-class  honors  as  a  Bachelor  of  Civil  Law  in 
April,  1910.  In  the  fall  of  1907  Mr.  Tulk  was  articled  to  and  entered  the  office 
of  Hon.  C.  J.  Doherty,  K.  C.,  M.  P.,  now  Dominion  minister  of  justice,  where 
he  remained  three  years,  and  during  which  time  in  April,  1910,  at  Quebec  city 
he  was  admitted  to  the  practice  of  law  in  the  courts  of  the  province  of  Quebec. 
Returning  to  Vancouver  in  March,  1911,  Mr.  Tulk  passed  the  British  Columbia 
provincial  examinations  and  was  called  to  the  bar  and  admitted  as  solicitor  of 
the  supreme  court,  rapidly  acquiring  an  extensive  practice  and  demonstrating 
his  vast  commercial  experience  in  his  handling  of  some  important  civil  cases 
wherein  a  wide  knowledge  of  commercial  law  was  essential.  The  following  year 
Mr.  Tulk  became  a  member  of  the  firm  of  Henderson,  Tulk  &  Bray. 

Mr.  Tulk  has  many  claims  upon  his  time  and  energies,  being  a  director  and 
large  shareholder  in  the  Graham  Island  Settlement  Company,  Limited,  who  own 
twenty  thousand  acres  on  Graham  island,  and  who  for  the  past  two  years  have 
been  actively  engaged  in  developing  and  colonizing  the  tract.  Mr.  Tulk  is  also 
a  director  of  a  large  number  of  commercial  and  financial  corporations,  as  well 
as  a  large  realty  holder  of  central  business  property,  and  enjoys  the  unique  ex- 
perience of  never  yet  having  sold  any  property  which  he  has  purchased,  and  in- 
vestments having  been  judiciously  made,  his  property  holdings  are  continually 
increasing  in  value. 

Associated  with  Harold  C.  Clarke,  A.  J.  Mayo  and  Fred  Schofield,  Mr.  Tulk 
organized  and  operated  the  first  independent  league  base  ball  in  Vancouver,  and 
built  the  first  base  ball  park  in  this  city,  the  old  Powell  Street  grounds,  which 
were  acquired  by  the  city  for  city  park  purposes.  When  Vancouver  took  over 
these  grounds,  Mr.  Tulk  obtained  a  franchise  in  the  North  Western  League,  and 
associated  with  Messrs.  W.  H.  Armstrong,  C.  M.  Marpole,  George  E.  MacDon- 
ald,  W.  D.  Haywood  and  others  and  built  and  operated  Recreation  Park  on  Homer 
street,  which  will  be  remembered  by  players  and  fans  of  all  sports  for  many 
years  to  come.  This  land  has  just  been  taken  back  by  the  Canadian  Pacific  Rail- 
way Company  and  is  being  cut  up  and  sold  for  warehouse  sites.  Mr.  Tulk  has 
always  been  active  in  lacrosse  and  football,  and  was  vice  president  of  the  West- 
End  Lacrosse  Club  for  many  years.  He  was  also  the  founder  and  organizer  of 


178  BRITISH    COLUMBIA 


the  present  Vancouver  Athletic  Club,  was  vice  president  on  its  first  board,  and 
was  a  director  for  many  years. 

In  June,  1902,  Mr.  Tulk  was  united  in  marriage  to  Miss  Marie  Josephine 
Nett  of  Hamilton,  Ontario,  and  they  have  one  son,  Alexander  Edward. 

In  politics  Mr.  Tulk  is  a  stanch  conservative  and  very  active  in  the  ranks  of 
the  party.  Being  a  young  man  and  possessing  in  a  marked  degree  that  splendid 
foresight  and  skilful  diplomacy  which  make  for  thorough,  broad  statesmanship, 
Mr.  Tulk  will,  in  all  probability,  find  in  the  political  arena  a  still  wider  scope 
for  his  talents.  Mr.  Tulk  is  a  member  of  the  Masonic  order,  and  also  of 
the  Loyal  Orange  Association.  That  he  is  appreciative  of  the  social  amenities 
of  life  is  indicated  in  his  memberships  in  the  University  Club,  the  Terminal  City 
Club  and  the  Commercial  Club.  He  is  a  member  of  the  Church  of  England. 

Mr.  Tulk  is  one  of  a  group  of  remarkable  and  notable  men  who  are  help- 
ing to  build  up  Vancouver  and  who  are  leaving  their  impress  upon  it.  Mr.  Tulk's 
hospitality  is  proverbial  and  he  is  generous  to  a  fault.  No  one  who  goes  to  him 
for  assistance  is  ever  turned  away  disappointed — he  is  scrupulously  honest  and 
upright,  is  a  devoted  friend,  and  possesses  social  qualities  of  a  rare  type  which 
render  him  an  exceedingly  enjoyable  companion.  Mr.  Tulk  has  the  reputation 
of  being  an  excellent  speaker  and  keen  debater,  and  beneath  a  serene  countenance 
and  patient  temperament  he  has  a  wonderful  gift  of  organization  and  magnetic 
influence  which  has  crowned  his  life  with  successful  accomplishments.  He  is 
possessed  of  the  typical  western  spirit  of  progress  and  enterprise,  but  has  never 
regarded  business  as  the  sole  end  and  aim  of  existence,  but  rather  as  an  important 
feature  of  a  life  which  has  also  been  devoted  to  various  other  affairs,  which  con- 
stitute important  elements  in  the  life  and  activity  of  a  nation. 


SAMUEL  JOHN  CASTLEMAN. 

Samuel  John  Castleman,  financial  and  mining  broker,  has  been  engaged  in  his 
present  business  in  Vancouver  since  1905.  Since  his  school  days  he  has  made 
continuous  progress  and  each  forward  step  in  his  career  has  brought  him  a  broader 
outlook  and  wider  opportunities.  He  early  recognized  the  fact  that  industry  and 
determination  spell  success  and  in  the  cultivation  and  utilization  of  those  qualities 
he  has  gained  the  creditable  position  that  he  now  fills  in  the  business  circles  of  his 
adopted  city.  He  is  of  Canadian  birth,  having  first  opened  his  eyes  to  the  light 
of  day  at  Dickinsons  Landing,  Ontario,  October  16,  1866.  His  parents  were 
Ralph  A.  and  Caroline  Elizabeth  (Hanes)  Castleman.  The  father  was  one  of  the 
pioneers  of  eastern  Ontario  and  the  town  of  Casselman  was  founded  by  his  family. 
The  son  pursued  his  education  in  the  public  schools  of  Stormont  county,  Ontario, 
and  in  the  Ottawa  Business  College  in  the  city  of  Ottawa.  On  leaving  school  in  1884 
he  was  taken  into  partnership  by  his  father,  who  was  then  operating  a  large  lum- 
ber and  milling  business,  the  firm  being  styled  R.  A.  Castleman  &  Son.  That 
partnership  continued  until  1887,  when  Mr.  Castleman  engaged  in  the  brick  and 
tile  manufacturing  business,  in  which  he  remained  until  1894.  He  then  joined 
the  accounting  staff  of  the  Canada-Atlantic  Railway  and  was  accountant  and 
cashier  with  that  company  for  ten  years.  In  1905  he  came  to  Vancouver,  British 
Columbia,  and  engaged  in  his  present  business,  handling  mining  properties  and 
stocks.  He  is  thoroughly  conversant  concerning  the  value  of  commercial  paper,  and 
his  comprehensive  knowledge  enables  him  to  so  place  investments  for  his  clients 
that  excellent  returns  are  secured.  He  has  himself  been  a  large  and  judicious  inves- 
tor in  mining  properties,  bank  paper  and  other  stocks,  and  has  large  holdings  in 
British  Columbia.  In  fact  he  is  extensively  connected  with  corporate  interests 
and  is  past  president  of  the  Kitsilano  Improvement  Association ;  the  promoter  of 
the  Irkeda  Mines,  Limited,  and  the  Island  Valley  Railway  Company;  a  director 
in  the  Amalgamated  Gold  Mines  of  British  Columbia,  and  vice  president  of  the 


SAMUEL  J.  CASTLEMAN 


BRITISH    COLUMBIA  181 

Grand  Trunk  Lands  Company,  Ltd.  His  judgment  is  sound;  his  discrimination 
keen,  and  his  business  activity  always  follows  careful  consideration  of  the  different 
points  of  the  questions  at  issue. 

On  the  8th  of  March,  1893,  m  Ottawa,  Ontario,  Mr.  Castleman  was  united  in 
marriage  to  Miss  Jean  Elizabeth  Cameron,  a  daughter  of  a  prominent  family  of 
Pembroke,  Ontario.  They  have  two  children,  Gordon  and  Gladys.  Mr.  Castle- 
man has  ever  been  interested  in  matters  of  public  moment  and  has  cooperated 
in  various  projects  which  have  resulted  beneficially  to  the  communities  in  which 
he  has  lived.  While  residing  at  Casselman,  Ontario,  he  served  as  school  trustee 
from  1888  until  1890  and  was  councilor  there  from  1891  until  1893.  His  political 
allegiance  has  always  been  given  to  the  liberal  party,  and  his  religious  faith  is 
that  of  the  Presbyterian  church.  He  is  a  Scottish  Rite  Mason  and  he  belongs  to 
the  Terminal  City,  the  Royal  Vancouver  Yacht  and  the  Vancouver  Athletic  Clubs. 
He  is  interested  in  marine  sports  and  derives  considerable  pleasure  from  motor- 
boating.  Progress  has  been  the  keynote  of  his  character,  and  throughout  the 
years  since  he  completed  his  education  he  has  continuously  advanced,  winning 
his  success  through  the  utilization  of  measures  and  methods  which  neither  seek 
nor  require  disguise. 


FINLEY  ROBERT  .McDONALD  RUSSELL. 

Finley  Robert  McDonald  Russell,  barrister  of  Vancouver  and  one  who  is 
equally  well  known  in  connection  with  benevolent  work  and  also  in  social  and 
athletic  circles  of  the  city,  was  born  at  Newcastle,  New  Brunswick,  October  13, 
1870,  a  son  of  Matthew  and  Sarah  (Ingram)  Russell,  both  of  whom  were  natives 
of  New  Brunswick.  The  father  was  engaged  in  the  manufacturing  business, 
was  interested  in  steamboat  lines  and  had  various  other  business  connections 
which  made  him  a  prominent  factor  in  connection  with  public  interests  of  New- 
castle, where  his  entire  life  was  passed.  His  death  there  occurred  in  1908  and 
his  widow  now  resides  in  Victoria,  British  Columbia. 

In  the  attainment  of  his  education  Finley  Robert  McDonald  Russell  attended 
Harkin's  Academy  at  Newcastle  and  later  was  employed  by  his  father  until  he 
reached  the  age  of  nineteen  years.  In  1889  he  came  to  Vancouver  and  in  the 
fall  of  that  year  was  articled  to  his  elder  brother,  J.  A.  Russell,  a  barrister  of 
this  city.  In  1896  he  was  called  to  the  bar  of  British  Columbia  and  entered 
upon  active  practice  as  a  member  of  the  firm  of  Russell  &  Russell,  remaining  in 
association  with  his  brother  in  the  practice  of  the  profession  until  January  i, 
I9I3>  when  he  became  senior  partner  in  the  firms  of  Russell,  Macdonald  & 
Hancox  and  Russell,  Mowat,  Hancox  &  Farris.  His  practice  is  now  large  and 
of  an  important  character,  connecting  him  with  much  notable  litigation.  His 
knowledge  of  the  principles  of  jurisprudence  is  comprehensive  and  exact  and  he 
is  seldom  if  ever  at  fault  in  their  application. 

In  Acton,  Ontario,  in  1898,  Mr.  Russell  was  united  in  marriage  to  Miss  Agnes 
Isabel  Macpherson,  a  daughter  of  the  late  Archibald  Macpherson,  who  was  a 
prominent  educator  in  Gait,  Ontario.  They  have  four  children,  Alan  Macpher- 
son, Hugh  McLaren,  Isabel  Macpherson  and  Jean  Macpherson.  The  parents 
are  adherents  of  St.  John's  Presbyterian  church.  In  politics  Mr.  Russell  is  a 
liberal,  working  untiringly  in  the  interests  of  his  party  yet  never  seeking  office, 
and  he  is  a  director  of  The  Sun,  the  liberal  organ  of  Vancouver.  He  is  a  past 
master  of  Western  Gate  Lodge,  No.  48,  A.  F.  &  A.  M.,  has  taken  the  degrees  of 
the  Royal  Arch  Chapter  and  has  attained  the  thirty-second  degree  of  the  Scottish 
Rite.  He  is  ever  loyal  to  the  benevolent  principles  of  the  fraternity  which  is 
based  upon  mutual  helpfulness  and  brotherly  kindness  and  he  is  interested  in 
various  charitable  and  humanitarian  projects,  being  a  life  governor  of  the  Van- 
couver General  Hospital  and  for  years  was  a  director  of  the  Children's  Aid 
Society.  His  name  is  also  a  familiar  one  in  athletic  and  club  circles.  He  was 


182  BRITISH    COLUMBIA 

the  first  president  elected  to  office  at  the  organization  of  the  Vancouver  Athletic 
Club,  of  which  he  is  a  life  member,  and  served  for  four  years  in  the  presidency. 
He  was  also  for  a  rwimber  of  years  the  vice  president  of  the  Vancouver  Rowing 
Club  and  in  1913  was  elected  president  of  the  North  Pacific  Association  of  Ama- 
teur Oarsmen,  which  is  made  up  of  clubs  from  Vancouver,  Victoria,  Portland 
and  Seattle.  The  association  has  held  a  regetta  every  year  for  the  past  twenty 
years  and  that  for  1913  will  be  held  in  Vancouver.  Mr.  Russell  is  now  serving 
for  a  second  term  as  president  of  the  association  and  he  is  a  past  president  of 
the  Vancouver  Auto  Club.  He  is  also  solicitor  for  the  Vancouver  Horse  Show 
Association  and  the  vice  president  for  British  Columbia  of  the  Pacific  Highway 
Association,  under  whose  auspices  the  Mexico-Alaskan  highway  is  being  con- 
structed. The  Brocton  Point  Athletic  Club  numbers  him  among  its  directors 
and  he  belongs  also  to  the  Vancouver,  Vancouver  Hunt,  Commercial,  Jericho 
Country,  Vancouver  Tennis,  Shaughnessy  Heights  and  Vancouver  Golf  and 
Country  Clubs.  His  interests  are  wide  and  varied.  His  social  qualities  make 
him  popular  in  the  different  organizations  with  which  he  is  connected  and  yet  he 
never  allows  club  affairs  to  interfere  with  his  professional  duties  and  his  devo- 
tion to  his  clients'  interests  has  become  proverbial. 


GORDON  DRYSDALE. 

Under  the  style  of  Gordon  Drysdale,  Limited,  is  conducted  the  leading  retail 
dry-goods  house  of  Vancouver.  It  is  the  Marshall  Field  establishment  of  this 
city,  setting  the  standard  for  similar  enterprises,  and  its  steady  growth  results 
from  progressive  methods  that  introduce  all  that  is  novel  and  attractive  in  the 
line  of  goods  handled.  Gordon  Drysdale  has  notable  ability  in  coordinating 
forces  and  combining  seemingly  diverse  elements  into  a  unified  and  harmonious 
whole,  and  possesses  in  large  measure  the  genius  for  devising  and  executing  the 
right  thing  at  the  right  time. 

A  native  of  Colchester,  Nova  Scotia,  he  was  born  April  8,  1859,  a  son  of 
George  and  Margaret  (Shearer)  Drysdale.  The  paternal  grandfather  came 
from  Scotland  and  settled  in  Tatamagouche  mountain  district  of  Colchester 
county,  Nova  Scotia,  where  he  engaged  in  farming.  His  son,  George  Drysdale, 
was  born  and  reared  on  his  father's  farm  in  Colchester  county,  and  on  reach- 
ing his  maturity  began  farming  on  his  own  account,  following  that  occupation 
until  his  death.  His  wife,  Margaret  Shearer,  was  also  descended  from  a  Scotch 
family  that  settled  in  Colchester  county. 

In  the  public  schools  of  his  native  county  Gordon  Drysdale  pursued  his  edu- 
cation and  in  1874,  when  a  youth  of  fifteen  years,  was  apprenticed  to  the  mer- 
cantile firm  of  J.  F.  Blanchard  &  Company  at  Truro,  Nova  Scotia,  where  he 
remained  until  1881.  He  was  then  sent  to  New  Glasgow,  Nova  Scotia,  where 
he  managed  a  branch  store  for  the  house  until  1884.  Ambitious,  however,  to  en- 
gage in  business  on  his  own  account,  he  then  began  dealing  in  general  merchandise 
in  partnership  with  his  brother,  Daniel  Drysdale,  under  the  firm  style  of  Drys- 
dale Brothers.  Success  attended  the  new  undertaking  from  the  beginning  and 
after  a  short  time  Mr.  Drysdale  purchased  his  brother's  interest  in  the  business, 
which  he  conducted  alone,  but  under  the  same  style,  until  1892.  The  opportuni- 
ties of  the  growing  west  proved  an  irresistible  attraction  to  him  and  in  that 
year  he  came  to  Vancouver,  purchasing  the  general  mercantile  business  conducted 
by  Haley  &  Sutton  on  Cordova  street.  He  continued  the  business  under  his 
own  name  and  conducted  it  successfully  at  that  location  until  1899,  when  he 
removed  to  larger  quarters  at  the  corner  of  Cambie  and  Cordova  streets,  there 
remaining  until  1903,  when  his  interests  were  amalgamated  with  those  of  Charles 
E.  Stevenson  under  the  firm  name  of  Drysdale-Stevenson,  Ltd.  They  con- 
ducted business  on  Hastings  street  under  that  name  until  1906,  when  the  interest 
of  Mr.  Stevenson  was  purchased  by  David  Spencer,  who  later  in  the  year  also 


GORDON  DRYSDALE 


BRITISH    COLUMBIA  185 

purchased  the  interest  of  Mr.  Drysdale  and  the  business  became  and  is  still 
conducted  as  David  Spencer,  Ltd.  In  1907,  on  completion  of  the  building  now 
occupied  by  Mr.  Drysdale,  he  again  entered  the  mercantile  field  as  Gordon 
Drysdale,  Limited,  and  so  continues  to  the  present  time.  His  is  the  finest 
exclusive  store  in  Vancouver,  or  in  all  western  Canada,  an  extensive  stock 
of  high-class  goods  being  carried.  The  store  is  most  attractive  in  all  its  equip- 
ments and  appointments  and  courtesy  on  the  part  of  all  employes  is  demanded, 
patrons  receiving  every  possible  attention.  The  company  was  the  first  in  Van- 
couver to  inaugurate  six  o'clock  closing,  and  in  1912  they  introduced  the  plan 
of  closing  on  Saturdays,  during  July  and  August,  at  one  o'clock.  They  are  prac- 
tically the  only  firm  in  the  city  today  who  follow  this  practice  and  have  naturally 
earned  the  thankfulness  of  their  employes,  whose  loyalty  to  the  house  has  been 
greatly  increased  by  this  measure.  The  store  further  enjoys  the  enviable  reputa- 
tion of  employing  only  first-class  help  and  paying  therefor  first-class  salaries. 
The  employes  are  well  treated  and  many  measures  are  undertaken  to  contribute 
to  their  welfare  and  comfort.  The  business  is  a  general  dry-goods,  millinery,  and 
ladies'  and  children's  furnishings  establishment  and  they  also  maintain  a  carpet 
and  draperies  department.  The  fundamental  principle  upon  which  it  is  built 
is  to  treat  the  public  fairly,  and  their  reputation  is  that  their  advertisements  are 
always  strictly  confined  to  statements  of  facts,  and  the  public  accept  these  adver- 
tisements absolutely  for  what  they  say.  It  has  been  the  motto  of  the  firm 
"never  to  misrepresent,"  and  that  such  conduct  is  appreciated  is  evident  from 
their  ever  increasing  patronage.  The  Gordon  Drysdale,  Limited,  in  every 
respect  enjoys  high  confidence  in  the  eyes  of  the  public  and  the  efficient  upbuild- 
ing of  the  organization,  supported  by  the  unswerving  loyalty  of  their  employes, 
is  largely  the  work  of  Gordon  Drysdale,  who  by  his  fair  methods  of  operation 
has  brought  it  to  its  present  success.  It  is  now  a  business  of  mammoth  pro- 
portions and  stands  as  a  monument  to  the  business  ability  and  progressive  meth- 
ods of  the  owner. 

In  politics  Mr.  Drysdale  is  a  liberal  but  not  an  active  party  worker.  On  the 
1st  of  December,  1887,  he  married  Miss  Maria  MacGregor,  a  daughter  of  Robert 
MacGregor,  of  New  Glasglow,  Nova  Scotia,  and  their  children  are  George 
Rudolf,  Janet  Robertson  and  Norman  MacGregor.  Mr.  Drysdale  is  a  mem- 
ber of  no  clubs  or  societies,  preferring  home  life  when  not  occupied  with  the 
cares  of  management  of  an  extensive  business.  Each  step  in  his  career  has 
been  a  forward  one.  He  has  been  watchful  of  all  the  details  of  his  business, 
and  all  indications  pointing  toward  prosperity  from  the  beginning,  and  has  had 
an  abiding  faith  in  the  ultimate  success  of  his  enterprise.  He  has  gained 
prosperity,  yet  that  has  not  been  alone  the  goal  for  which  he  is  striving,  for 
he  belongs  to  that  class  of  representative  Canadian  citizens  who  promote  the 
general  welfare  while  advancing  their  individual  interests. 


JOSEPH    EDWARD    OLIVER. 

In  July,  1880,  following  a  varied  and  eventful  career  as  a  sailor,  adventurer 
and  gold  seeker,  Joseph  Edward  Oliver  settled  in  British  Columbia  and  became 
identified  with  passenger  and  freight  navigation  interests  on  the  Eraser  river 
and  so  continued  for  many  years.  He  died  in  New  Westminster  in  1908  and 
the  community  was  thus  deprived  of  one  of  its  leading  and  representative  citizens 
and  the  province  of  one  of  the  earliest  and  greatest  of  its  pioneers. 

Mr.  Oliver  was  born  in  Newcastle-on-Tyne,  January  i,  1846,  and  was  a  son 
of  John  Oliver,  of  that  city.  In  the  acquirement  of  an  education  he  attended 
public  school  in  London  but  his  advantages  along  this  line  were  limited,  for  while 
he  was  still  in  his  teens  he  went  to  sea,  making  trips  to  China,  Africa,  South 
America,  Norway,  Sweden  and  Russia  and  enduring  many  hardships  and  priva- 
tions incident  to  the  life  and  the  times.  During  the  Civil  war  in  the  United 


186  BRITISH    COLUMBIA 

States  he  was  on  a  blockade  runner  and  was  wounded  by  the  bursting  of  a  gun 
on  the  deck  and  was  taken  prisoner.  After  he  was  released  he  worked  his  way 
westward,  running  a  construction  engine  on  the  Central  Pacific  Railway  through 
the  Sierra  Nevada  mountains,  going  as  far  as  Sacramento,  California,  where  he 
worked  on  a  boat  on  the  Sacramento  river,  afterward  making  trips  between  the 
isthmus  of  Panama  and  Portland,  Oregon.  He  was  later  a  member  of  the  crew 
of  a  vessel  which  went  north  with  the  telegraph  cable  and  thus  aided  in  connect- 
ing the  old  world  with  the  new.  After  spending  a  hard  winter  in  the  northern 
United  States  and  Canada  he  went  with  his  vessel  back  to  San  Francisco  and 
from  there  again  went  north  to  New  Westminster,  making  his  first  location  in 
this  city  in  very  early  pioneer  times.  From  here  he  tramped  to  the  Cariboo  gold 
fields,  but  not  meeting  with  success  in  prospecting,  went  to  Moodyville,  settling 
there  about  the  year  1875.  For  a  time  he  worked  in  a  machine  shop,  of  which 
the  late  James  Lockhart  was  master  mechanic  for  the  Moodyville  mills,  and  was 
afterward  employed  in  the  Hastings  mill.  Leaving  Moodyville  about  the  year 
1879,  he  went  to  San  Francisco,  sailing  from  that  point  around  the  Horn  to 
England,  where  in  the  following  year  he  married  Miss  Elizabeth  Wallis.  In 
the  same  year  he  brought  his  bride  to  British  Columbia,  making  his  second  per- 
manent location  in  this  province  in  1880.  He  secured  a  position  as  engineer  on 
the  little  steamer  Maggie,  with  George  Gilley  as  captain,  and  for  several  years 
he  ran  on  small  boats  on  the  Fraser  river.  In  1884  he  shipped  as  engineer  on 
the  first  ferryboat,  the  K.  de  K.,  and  about  one  year  later  held  a  similar  position 
on  the  Gladys,  then  owned  by  the  late  W.  B.  Townsend,  who  sold  her  afterward 
to  the  late  Captain  Power.  Mr.  Oliver  continued  aboard  this  vessel  for  two 
years  and  then  in  company  with  three  others  bought  the  steamer  Telephone  and 
built  up  a  large  and  lucrative  freight  navigation  business  on  the  lower  Fraser 
river,  their  patronage  extending  so  rapidly  that  they  later  built  the  steamer 
Edgar  which  ran  between  the  important  ports  on  the  lower  stream  until  she  was 
burned  in  the  fire  of  1898.  Afterward  the  same  company  bought  the  Ramona, 
but  this  venture  not  proving  successful,  Mr.  Oliver  became  engineer  on  the 
dredge  King  Edward.  This  position  he  held  until  1903,  when  he  retired,  ill 
health  terminating  the  activities  of  an  eventful,  varied  and  useful  career.  He 
died  in  New  Westminster  on  the  I7th  of  May,  1908,  and  in  his  death  the  province 
lost  one  of  the  greatest  individual  forces  in  the  early  organization  and  later 
upbuilding  of  its  inland  navigation  interests. 

Mr.  Oliver  married  in  England,  in  1880,  Miss  Elizabeth  Wallis  and  they 
became  the  parents  of  three  children :  William  Edward  Wallis,  chief  engineer  of 
the  Princess  May;  Mildred  Ruth,  a  stenographer;  and  Isabelle,  who  is  engaged 
in  teaching  school.  The  family  are  members  of  the  Church  of  England  and  are 
well  known  in  New  Westminster,  where  the  name  borne  by  an  upright,  honorable 
and  worthy  man  has  been  well  known  since  pioneer  times. 


REV.  ROBERT  JAMIESON. 

Hand  in  hand  with  the  work  of  material  progress  in  the  development  of  the 
northwest  has  been  found  the  effort  for  the  moral  upbuilding  of  the  province, 
and  thus  it  is  that  high  standards  of  manhood  and  citizenship  have  been  main- 
tained, for  the  people  on  the  whole  are  actuated  by  a  spirit  of  Christian  teach- 
ing which  constitutes  the  guiding  force  in  their  lives.  Among  the  first-  to  sow 
the  seeds  of  Christian  faith  in  the  northwest  was  the  Rev.  Robert  Jamieson,  who 
became  the  pioneer  minister  of  the  Canada  Presbyterian  church  in  British 
Columbia.  He  was  born  in  1829  and  was  therefore  a  young  man  of  twenty-four 
years  when  he  entered  upon  the  active  work  of  the  ministry  at  Belturbet,  Ireland, 
in  1853.  Three  years  later,  or  in  1856,  he  crossed  the  Atlantic  to  Canada  and 
was  called  to  the  pastorate  of  the  churches  at  Dunville  and  at  York  Mills.  On 
the  loth  of  December,  1861,  at  Knox  church  in  Toronto,  he  was  designated  as 


REV.  ROBERT  JAMIESON 


BRITISH    COLUMBIA  189 

the  first  missionary  of  his  denomination  to  British  Columbia.  The  work  of 
progress  and  development  seemed  scarcely  begun  in  this  section  of  the  country. 
There  was  no  railroad  connection  with  the  east  and  comparatively  few  steam- 
ships carried  their  passengers  and  their  freight  to  this  section  of  the  new  world. 
Early  in  1862,  however,  the  Rev.  Robert  Jamieson  arrived  in  Victoria,  where  he 
found  the  Rev.  John  Hall,  of  the  Irish  Presbyterian  church,  who  extended  to 
him  a  most  hearty  and  cordial  welcome.  He  proceeded  on  his  way  to  New 
Westminster  and  there  was  most  gladly  and  cordially  welcomed  by  the  Presby- 
terians of  the  district,  who  were  anxious  again  to  hear  the  teachings  of  the 
gospel  according  to  the  tenets  in  which  they  believed.  He  at  once  proceeded 
to  organize  the  congregation  of  St.  Andrew's  and  a  manse  and  a  church  were 
soon  erected,  his  parishioners  subscribing  three  thousand  dollars  to  the  work 
the  first  year.  For  four  years  Mr.  Jamieson  labored  untiringly  in  the  interests 
of  his  congregation  and  of  the  community.  He  not  only  undertook  the  moral 
development  of  the  district  but  also  consented  to  establish  and  conduct  a  school, 
which  was  the  first  one  of  that  locality.  He  obtained  a  grant  of  five  hundred 
dollars  from  the  government  to  supplement  the  fees  and  he  remained  in  charge 
of  the  school  until  he  was  able  to  secure  another  teacher.  One,  writing  of  this 
period  of  his  life,  said :  "It  can  easily  be  imagined  that  a  population  of  adven- 
turous men,  ebbing  and  flowing  almost  with  the  frequency,  but  by  no  means  with 
the  regularity,  of  the  tides,  was  not  the  best  from  which  to  build  up  a  settled 
congregation.  For  many  years  there  was  no  session,  and  the  board  of  man- 
agement was  chosen  from  those  who  could  be  induced  to  serve.  Whether  it 
was  the  patching  of  a  roof  or  the  education  of  the  children — for  the  church 
preceded  the  public  school — the  pastor  was  the  leader,  the  organizer;  often,  as 
in  the  school,  the  worker;  nothing  was  too  laborious  to  be  attempted,  nothing 
too  trivial  to  be  attended  to,  if  it  contributed  to  the  success  of  the  work  he  had 
set  himself  to  do."  After  four  years  spent  in  New  Westminster  Mr.  Jamieson, 
laving  obtained  a  successor  for  the  work  there,  went  to  Nanaimo,  where  he 
again  met  the  experiences  of  the  pioneer  preacher  in  the  establishment  and 
development  of  a  church  at  that  place.  His  efforts  were  crowned  with  notable 
success  at  Nanaimo  during  the  three  years  or  more  of  his  residence  there.  He 
then  returned  to  St.  Andrew's,  heartily  welcomed  by  his  first  parishioners  of 
the  northwest.  Still  his  services  as  a  pioneer  preacher  were  not  ended,  for 
he  traveled  up  and  down  the  Fraser  valley,  establishing  churches  at  Langley, 

laple  Ridge  and  Richmond,  continuing  to  give  to  them  such  aid  as  he  could, 
preaching  for  them  when  opportunity  offered.  Summer  and  winter,  rain  or 
shine,  he  continued  in  this  self-imposed  task,  in  which  connection  it  has  been 

written:  "Three  services  a  day,  with  fifteen  to  twenty  miles  travel  in  a  canoe, 
mder  a  cold,  drizzle,  or  a  scorching  sun,  as  an  interlude,  coupled  with  all  the 
usual  hardships  of  work  in  an  isolated  field,  and  the  special  trial  of  constantly 
facing  the  question  of  duty — to  go  on  where  progress  was  so  slow  or  to  seek  a 
wider  sphere  of  usefulness — small  wonder  if  these  broke  down  a  constitution 
never  robust,  so  that  Mr.  Jamieson  found  himself  an  old  man  before  his  fiftieth 
fear!"  Soon  after  the  Confederation  in  1871  the  condition  of  the  church  as 
well  as  of  the  country  improved,  for  the  Church  of  Scotland  took  up  the  work 
in  the  province  and  Mr.  Jamieson  then  concentrated  his  efforts  upon  the  church 
)f  St.  Andrew's  in  New  Westminster.  When  a  controversy  arose  concerning 
the  route  of  the  Canadian  Pacific  Railway,  many  of  the  new  ministers  who  had 
)een  sent  to  the  west  left  the  province  and  again  Mr.  Jamieson  continued  his 
efforts  almost  alone.  There  is  no  one  man  to  whom  Presbyterianism  in  British 

Columbia  is  so  greatly  indebted.    He  lived  to  see  substantial  growth  and  improve- 

icnt  in  the  church  as  well  as  the  country.  Early  in  1884  the  congregation 
lecided  that  it  could  be  self-supporting  and  not  depend  upon  funds  from  out- 
ride sources.  Just  at  this  time  Mr.  Jamieson  was  prostrated  by  an  illness  so 
severe  that  his  friends  did  not  believe  he  could  recover.  Compelled  to  resign, 
iis  congregation  voted  him  a  liberal  retiring  allowance  and  in  every  way  strove 
to  mark  its  appreciation  of  his  life  work.  He  recovered  sufficiently  to  be  able 

Vol.  HI—  7 


190  BRITISH    COLUMBIA 

to  act  as  chaplain  of  the  penitentiary  and  when  his  health  permitted  he  was 
always  ready  to  supply  a  vacant  pulpit,  but  death  called  him  in  September,  1893, 
when  he  was  but  sixty-four  years  of  age.  The  Presbyterian  Record,  writing 
of  him,  said:  "Mr.  Jamieson  was  emphatically  a  strong  man.  With  natural 
abilities  of  a  high  order,  a  well-stored  mind,  a  humor  that  was  a  quaint  mixture 
of  the  racy  Irish  and  the  dry  Scotch,  a  restless  energy  and  dauntless  courage, 
he  was  one  to  be  reckoned  with  in  any  matter  in  which  he  had  a  part.  He 
preached  the  old  gospel  of  salvation  through  a  crucified  and  risen  Saviour,  and 
as  a  preacher  he  has  had  but  few  equals  in  the  province.  On  the  platform,  too, 
while  health  permitted  him  to  take  part  in  the  discussion  of  public  questions,  he 
was  a  power.  In  one  respect  he  was  intolerant:  he  had  a  quick,  fierce  contempt 
for  falsehood  and  lies.  A  sentence  from  a  commemorative  sermon  preached 
by  the  Rev.  A.  Dunn,  himself  a  pioneer,  might  be  taken  as  Mr.  Jamieson's  epitaph : 
'He  spared  no  man's  sin  or  unbelief,  he  courted  no  man's  favor,  and  he  feared 
no  man's  face.'  Not  until  the  pioneers  and  their  children  have  passed  away  will 
the  memory  of  Mr.  Jamieson  and  of  the  work  he  did  for  his  Master  and  his 
church  fade  in  British  Columbia." 


JAMES  FINDLAY. 

In  James  Findlay  Vancouver  has  a  citizen  who  sways  men  with  the  force 
of  his  example,  for  he  has  come  to  be  recognized  as  a  man  of  sound  judgment, 
of  capability  and  unquestioned  loyalty  to  the  public  good.  He  has  always  been 
a  student  of  vital  and  significant  problems  relating  to  the  public  welfare  and  to 
his  continually  broadening  opportunities  he  has  brought  to  bear  a  clear  under- 
standing. His  personal  characteristics  and  personal  qualities  are  pronounced 
and  he  is  an  acceptable  companion  in  any  society  in  which  intelligence  and  worth 
are  necessary  attributes  to  agreeableness. 

A  native  of  Montreal,  Quebec,  Mr.  Findlay  was  born  October  5,  1854,  a 
son  of  Captain  Jonathan  Duncan  Glegg  and  Mary  (Mercer)  Findlay,  the  former 
a  contractor  of  Montreal,  born  in  Fifeshire,  Scotland,  in  1808.  The  grandfather, 
Captain  James  Findlay,  of  the  Royal  Navy,  served  as  a  lieutenant  in  1797  in 
the  North  Sea,  under  Admiral  Duncan,  and  participated  in  the  engagement 
which  won  the  first  decided  victory  over  the  Dutch  fleet.  He  later  was  promoted 
to  the  rank  of  captain  in  the  Royal  Navy,  serving  at  a  period  when  sailing  ves- 
sels were  the  only  means  of  defense.  They  were  the  old-time  wooden  craft  and 
their  equipment  in  cannon  and  firearms  was  as  primitive  and  cumbersome  as 
was  the  vessel  upon  which  they  were  loaded.  Nothing  shows  more  clearly  the 
development  and  progress  of  the  times  than  the  changes  in  methods  of  warfare 
when  today  the  great  dreadnoughts  and  superdreadnoughts  of  steel  construc- 
.  tion  hurl  their  death-dealing  weapons  for  miles  across  the  sea  with  almost  ab- 
solute accuracy  of  aim.  The  same  spirit  of  courage,  however,  has  always  ani- 
mated the  breast  of  the  defender  of  British  interests  whether  upon  land  or  sea 
or  whether  in  wooden  hulls  or  in  armor-plate  battleships.  It  was  ability,  merit 
and  courage  that  won  for  James  Findlay  his  promotion  to  a  captaincy  in  the 
navy.  His  wife  was  Ellen  Rudiman,  a  niece  of  Professor  Thomas  Rudiman, 
the  celebrated  scholar  and  Latin  author. 

Their  son,  Captain  J.  D.  G.  Findlay,  received  a  practical  education  in  the 
schools  of  his  native  land.  He  entered  the  East  India  Company's  naval  service 
as  midshipman  in  1822,  when  but  fourteen  years  of  age,  and  later  became  con- 
nected directly  with  the  Royal  Navy.  He  participated  in  the  taking  of  Rangoon 
on  the  Irrawaddy  and  distinguished  himself  during  the  whole  of  the  Burmese 
war,  passing  through  many  dangers  and  receiving  at  different  times  wounds 
at  the  hands  of  the  pirates.  In  1838  Captain  Findlay  resigned  from  the  service 
of  the  East  India  Company  and  later  was  honored  by  royal  appointment  to  the 
commission  of  chief  officer  of  the  frigate  Trident,  which  carried  Her  Most 


JAMES  FINDLAY 


BRITISH    COLUMBIA  193 

Gracious  Majesty,  the  late  Queen  Victoria,  from  Granton  Pier  to  Woolwich, 
in  1842,  on  the  return  of  Her  Majesty  from  her  first  visit  to  Scotland.  Mr.  Find- 
lay  came  to  Canada  in  1843,  settling  in  the  city  of  Montreal.  He  was  first 
employed  in  building  locks  on  the  Lachine  canal  and  afterward  was  a  contractor 
for  the  St.  Lawrence  &  Atlantic  Railway.  He  was  also  the  contractor  who  built 
the  entrance  lock  on  the  old  Lachine  canal,  the  Hon.  Alexander  MacKenzie  being 
the  foreman  at  the  time,  and  Mr.  Findlay  often  recalled  that  he  at  one  time  had 
to  discharge  him  for  disobeying  orders  of  the  board  of  works,  Mr.  MacKenzie 
believing  he  knew — as  he  undoubtedly  did — the  best  manner  of  doing  the  work. 
Mr.  Findlay  was  also  employed  by  the  Canadian  Pacific  in  building  the  road  from 
St.  Therese  to  St.  Jerome  and  from  St.  Rose  to  St.  Scholastique.  He  also  did 
important  work  for  the  Canadian  Pacific  in  connection  with  the  building  of  the 
wharfs  at  Montreal  and  was  employed  by  the  Dominion  government  in  building 
the  canal  and  bridges  from  Montreal  to  Cote  St.  Paul.  His  ability  as  a  con- 
tractor is  clearly  evident  from  the  many  large  undertakings  which  he  success- 
fully completed.  In  1848  Mr.  Findlay  married,  in  Montreal,  Mary,  daughter 
of  John  Mercer.  He  was  by  religion  a  Congregationalist  and  in  politics  a  con- 
servative. 

James  Findlay,  whose  name  introduces  this  review,  pursued  his  early  educa- 
tion in  the  public  schools  of  Montreal  and  the  high  school  of  Bowmanville,  and 
afterward  went  to  Scotland,  where  he  was  apprenticed  to  the  trade  of  marine 
engineer.  Upon  completing  his  course  he  returned  to  Canada  and  in  1882  went 
to  Idaho,  where  he  engaged  in  the  mining  and  machinery  business,  continuing 
there  until  June,  1887,  when  he  came  to  British  Columbia,  settling  in  Vancouver. 
Here  he  continued  in  mining  and  in  the  machinery  business,  acting  as  manager 
and  superintendent  of  various  mines  throughout  the  province.  He  thus  reached 
a  prominent  place  in  business  circles,  bringing  him  at  length  to  the  position  where 
his. success  enabled  him  to  retire.  He  is  still  the  president  of  the  Art  Metal 
Works,  but  his  connection  therewith  is  one  of  financial  investment  and  not  of 
active  management. 

Important  and  extensive  as  have  been  the  business  interests  and  responsibili- 
ties which  have  devolved  upon  him,  Mr.  Findlay  has  yet  found  opportunity 
for  cooperation  in  various  measures  and  projects  which  have  to  do  with  the  wel- 
fare and  progress  of  the  city  and  its  people.  He  efficiently  served  as  mayor  of 
Vancouver,  giving  the  city  a  beneficial,  businesslike  administration,  and  during 
his  term  had  the  honor,  as  the  official  head  of  the  city  government,  of  meeting  and 
greeting,  in  the  name  of  the  municipality,  their  Royal  Highnesses,  the  Duke  and 
Duchess  of  Connaught,  who  were  then  on  a  visit  to  the  city.  He  was  for  two- 
years  a  director  of  the  Vancouver  General  Hospital  and  for  four  years  was  a 
member  of  the  License  Board  of  Vancouver.  His  political  allegiance  has  always 
been  given  to  the  conservative  party,  and  in  1911  he  was  president  of  the  Van- 
couver Conservative  Association.  He  has  labored  effectively  and  earnestly  in 
support  of  various  measures  of  civic  virtue  and  civic  pride  and  as  mayor  of  Van- 
couver in  1912  he  gave  to  the  city  a  public-spirited  and  progressive  administra- 
tion, conducted  along  businesslike  lines  and  resulting  in  various  needed  reforms 
ajid  improvements.  In  1909  and  1910  he  was  president  of  the  United  Service 
~lub  and  in  the  present  year,  1913,  had  the  honor  of  being  chosen  president  of 
:he  Progress  Club.  He  is  likewise  president  of  the  Caledonian  Society.  He 
has  always  taken  a  very  active  interest  in  athletics  and  manly  outdoor  sports,  is 
an  ex-president  of  the  Vancouver  Athletic  Club  and  also  of  the  Vancouver 
Amatuer  Lacrosse  Club,  of  which  he  is  now  honorary  president.  This  club 
is  the  holder  of  the  Mann  cup.  His  military  experience  covers  service  with  the 
^ictoria  Volunteer  Rifles  of  Montreal,  which  he  joined  as  a  bugler  in  1870,  and 
hile  in  Scotland  he  served  in  the  Coast  Artillery. 

Mr.  Findlay  was  married  in  Montreal  in  1880  to  Miss  Ellen  Georgina  Scott, 
of  Dublin,  Ireland,  and  they  became  the  parents  of  eight  children,  of  whom 
five  are  living:  Duncan  Bruce,  a  wholesale  hardware  and  manufacturers'  agent 
of  Vancouver;  Margaret  M.,  the  wife  of  W.  T.  Woodroffe,  superintendent  of 


194  BRITISH    COLUMBIA 

the  Edmonton  Electric  Railway  Company;  Ellen  May,  the  wife  of  Mathew 
Virtue,  electrical  engineer,  of  Vancouver;  James,  who  is  with  the  Edmonton 
Electric  &  Power  Company ;  and  Angus  C,  with  the  British  Columbia  Packers 
Association.  The  parents  hold  membership  in  St.  John's  Presbyterian  church  and 
Mr.  Findlay  belongs  to  St.  Andrews  Society.  The  principles  which  govern 
his  conduct  are  furthermore  indicated  in  the  fact  that  he  is  an  exemplary  repre- 
sentative of  Western  Gate  Lodge,  No.  48,  A.  F.  &  A.  M.  He  belongs  to  the 
Commercial,  United  Service  and  Imperial  Clubs,  and  these  associations  indicate 
his  interest  in  matters  relating  to  the  welfare,  progress  and  upbuilding  of  the 
city.  He  has  never  allowed  personal  interest  or  ambition  to  dwarf  his  public 
spirit  or  activities.  His  is  a  record  of  a  strong  individuality,  sure  of  itself, 
stable  in  purpose,  quick  in  perception,  swift  in  decision,  energetic  and  persistent 
in  action,  and  the  high  ideals  which  he  has  cherished  have  found  an  embodiment 
in  practical  effort  for  their  adoption. 


CHARLES  FENN  PRETTY. 

Charles  Fenn  Pretty,  as  president  of  Pretty's  Timber  Exchange,  Ltd.,  occu- 
pies a  position  of  leadership  in  connection  with  the  development  of  the  timber 
interests  of  the  country.  Laudable  ambition  has  prompted  him  in  his  undertakings 
and  his  labors  have  been  of  a  character  that  have  contributed  to  public  progress 
and  prosperity,  as  well  as  to  his  individual  success.  He  is  today  connected  with 
various  important  corporate  interests  and  his  judgment  has  come  to  be  relied 
upon  as  sound,  while  his  powers  of  organization,  combined  with  unabating 
industry  and  energy,  have  enabled  him  to  achieve  success  wherever  men  of  less 
resolute  purpose  would  have  met  failure. '  He  was  born  in  Belleville,  Ontario, 
August  31,  1865,  and  is  a  son  of  Charles  and  Ann  (Hyke)  Pretty.  The  father, 
a  native  of  Wingfield,  Suffolk  county,  England,  came  to  the  new  world  about 
1850,  settling  at  Belleville,  Ontario,  where  he  engaged  in  farming  until  1891.  He 
then  went  to  New  Westminster,  British  Columbia,  where  he  lived  retired  until 
his  death  in  1908. 

Charles  Fenn  Pretty  spent  his  youthful  days  in  the  usual  manner  of  farm 
lads,  with  a  fair  measure  of  opportunity  and  advantages.  He  acquired  a  good 
public-school  education  in  Belleville  and  Goderich,  Ontario,  and  subsequently 
engaged  in  farming  at  Goderich  until  1889.  The  following  year  he  arrived  in 
British  Columbia,  settling  on  the  Harrison  river,  where  he  again  gave  his  time 
and  attention  to  agricultural  pursuits.  Although  he  now  has  extensive  financial 
interests  he  still  maintains  his  home  at  Harrison  River  and  operates  his  farm, 
having  a  real  love  for  agricultural  life. 

In  1897  Mr.  Pretty  became  interested  in  the  timber  situation  in  British  Colum- 
bia and  began  to  invest  on  a  small  scale  in  timber  lands.  His  operations  gradu- 
ally grew  more  extensive  as  his  financial  resources  increased  and  in  1903  he 
organized  the  present  business  of  which  he  became  the  head  and  which  was 
incorporated  in  1911  as  Pretty's  Timber  Exchange,  Ltd.,  and  capitalized  for  five 
million  dollars  with  Mr:  Pretty  as  the  president.  The  company  makes  invest- 
ments in  large  tracts  of  timber  land,  consolidates  smaller  holdings  and  negoti- 
ates sales,  employing  a  staff  of  timber  experts  and  many  other  workmen.  They 
also  make  all  necessary  investigation  as  to  the  possibilities  of  the  land,  transpor- 
tation facilities  and  other  problems  relating  to  the  business.  Their  possessions 
in  timber  lands  cover  an  extensive  acreage  in  various  parts  of  British  Columbia 
and  their  holdings  also  include  numerous  mills  where  they  are  engaged  in 
timber  manufacturing  in  every  form,  making  a  specialty  of  ties,  bridge  timbers 
and  spars.  Associated  with  Mr.  Pretty  is  Thomas  T.  Dauphinee,  who  is  now 
general  manager  of  the  company.  Mr.  Pretty  showed  notable  realization  and 
appreciation  of  the  value  of  the  undeveloped  resources  of  British  Columbia, 
especially  in  connection  with  the  timber  situation  and,  acting  according  to  the 


CHARLES  F.  PRETTY 


BRITISH    COLUMBIA  197 

dictates  of  his  faith  and  judgment,  he  has  so  directed  his  labors  and  his  invest- 
ments as  to  reap  the  full  benefit  thereof.  Moreover,  in  this  connection  he  has 
done  much  for  the  development  of  the  great  timber  resources  of  the  country, 
adding  much  to  the  wealth  of  British  Columbia  through  shipments,  trade  inter- 
ests and  employment  furnished  to  many  workmen.  The  timber  industry  has 
become  one  of  the  foremost  of  the  northwest  and  in  that  connection  the  name 
of  C.  F.  Pretty  figures  prominently.  He  also  has  other  very  extensive  interests, 
being  president  and  managing  director  of  the  Vancouver  Harbor  &  Dock  Exten- 
sion Company,  Ltd.,  with  a  capitalization  of  ten  million  dollars.  He  is  the 
president  of  the  Greater  Vancouver  Company,  Ltd.,  capitalized  for  two  hun- 
dred and  fifty  thousand  dollars;  is  president  of  the  Canadian  Borneo  Company, 
Ltd.,  which  holds  extensive  concessions  from  the  Dutch  government  in  Dutch 
Borneo;  a  director  of  the  Canadian  Timber  &  Investment  Company,  Ltd.,  of 
London,  England ;  a  director  of  the  Anglo-Canadian  Timber  Company,  Ltd., 
of  London,  and  also  has  other  corporate  interests  besides  being  a  large  owner 
of  real  estate  and  farm  lands. 

On  the  24th  of  December,  1889,  Mr.  Pretty  was  united  in  marriage  to  Miss 
Charlotte  May  Sylvester,  daughter  of  Thomas  Sylvester,  of  the  Imperial  Gas 
Works  of  London,  England.  Unto  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Pretty  have  been  born  three 
sons,  Charles  Nelson,  Harry  Robinson  and  Leonard  Fenn.  Mr.  Pretty  votes 
with  the  conservative  party  and  his  religious  belief  is  that  of  the  Anglican  church. 
Signal  success  has  come  to  him  as  the  result  of  an  active,  well  spent  life.  He  has 
achieved  what  he  has  undertaken,  ever  carrying  forward  to  successful  comple- 
tion any  work  which  he  has  entered  upon.  In  his  vocabulary  there  is  no  such 
word  as  fail,  and  the  business  methods  he  has  employed  are  such  as  any  might 
cultivate.  His  position  is  due  to  the  fact  that  he  has  made  good  use  of  time, 
talent  and  opportunities,  has  maintained  an  unassailable  reputation  for  business 
integrity  and  has  followed  the  lead  of  a  laudable  ambition. 


FREDERICK  SMITH. 

One  of  the  important  commercial  enterprises  of  Vancouver  is  Smith,  Davidson 
&  Wright,  Limited,  a  wholesale  paper  house  whose  trade  interests  are  of  an 
extensive  character.  It  is  the  foremost  business  of  its  kind  in  the  province. 

Frederick  Smith,  its  president,  was  born  on  June  12,  1874,  at  Toronto, 
Ontario,  and  is  a  son  of  Henry  and  Anna  Smith,  the  former  a  pioneer  of  Toronto, 
where  he  now  lives  retired.  Frederick  Smith  attended  public  school  in  his  native 
city  and  after  completing  his  education  entered  the  employ  of  W.  J.  Gage  & 
Company,  Limited,  wholesale  and  manufacturing  stationers,  as  traveling  sales- 
man, remaining  in  that  connection  for  about  twenty  years,  gathering  a  varied 
and  valuable  experience  during  that  time.  Upon  his  business  trips  he  came 
numerous  times  to  the  west  and  perceiving  the  opportunities  a  waiting  aggres- 
sive young  men,  he  decided  to  launch  forth  independently  in  this  new  country 
and  in  1907  incorporated  in  Vancouver  the  firm  of  Smith,  Davidson  &  Wright, 
Limited,  of  which  he  was  elected  president,  an  office  which  he  has  held  ever 
since.  The  firm  can  now  look  back  upon  six  years  of  prosperous  existence,  its 
business  increasing  annually  in  volume  and  profits. 

Mr.  Smith  was  united  in  marriage,  at  Cypress  River,. Manitoba,  to  Miss  Jessie 
Farquharson,  a  daughter  of  James  and  Elizabeth  Farquharson.  Of  this  mar- 
riage were  born  three  sons :  Harry  Farquharson,  Norman  Frederick  and  Francis 
Arthur. 

The  vim  and  the  vigor  of  the  west  are  second  nature  to  Mr.  Smith,  who 
ever  stands  ready  to  participate  in  any  public  movement  undertaken  in  the 
interests  of  the  city.  Not  only  is  he  concerned  in  commercial  expansion  but  is 
interested  as  much  in  the  moral  and  intellectual  development  of  his  community. 
His  religious  faith  is  that  of  the  Presbyterian  church  and  in  club  life  he  is  a 


jp  i 

IK  1; 


, 


of  those  who  came  under  his  instruction.  It  is  well  known  that  "the  boy  is  father 
to  the  man,"  and  the  qualities  which  Coverdale  Watson  displayed  in  his  youth 
foreshadowed  not  only  the  strength  of  his  character  and  his  intellectual  power 
but  also  the  kindly  spirit  and  hearty  sympathy  which  made  him  popular  and 
loved  wherever  known.  His  character  was  Christian  in  a  sense  rarely  met  with. 
Of  a  gentle,  unselfish  and  sympathetic  disposition,  he  was  much  loved.  He  leaves 
a  memory  fragrant  with  goodness — a  memory  that  becomes  sweeter  with  the 
rolling  years. 

Born  near  Whitby,  Yorkshire,  England,  March  16,  1847,  Mr.  Watson  came 
with  his  parents  to  Canada  when  but  ten  years  of  age,  settling  in  the  township 
of  Walpole,  Haldimand  county,  Ontario,  where,  with  his  only  brother,  Joseph 
Watson,  he  grew  to  manhood.  He  was  from  infancy  surrounded  by  intensely 
religious  and  Methodistic  influences  and  early  gave  his  heart  to  God.  Being 
endowed  with  natural  gifts  of  a  high  order  and  possessing  a  studious  disposition 
and  a  fervent  religious  temperament,  it  was  not  surprising  that  he  was  led  by  his 
own  convictions,  confirmed  by  the  advice  of  judicious  friends,  to  devote  himself 
to  the  Christian  ministry.  For  his  chosen  life  work  he  prepared  himself  with 
conscientious  care,  laying  the  foundation  of  a  broad  and  liberal  education  in  the 
Scotland  high  school  and  at  Victoria  University,  in  Coburg. 

Rev.  Watson  entered  the  ministry  in  1869  and  was  stationed  successively  at 
Teeswater,  Londesborough,  Holmesville  and  Mitchell.  After  a  year  at  college  he 
was  sent  to  the  old  St.  John  church  at  Hamilton,  Ontario,  as  the  colleague  of  the 
late  Rev.  William  Stevenson,  being  received  into  the  full  connection  and  ordained 
in  1874.  From  the  commencement  of  his  ministerial  life  he  was  recognized  as 
a  man  of  unusual  promise  and  rapidly  rose  in  the  confidence  and  esteem  of  the 
church.  Following  his  ordination  he  was  sent  to  Yorkville,  then  to  Peterboro 
and  later  to  the  Spadina  Avenue  church,  Toronto.  In  the  year  of  his  marriage 
he  was  appointed  to  succeed  the  late  Rev.  R.  H.  Smith  as  chairman  of  the  then 
British  Columbia  district,  which  position  he  retained  until  the  organization  of 
the  British  Columbia  Conference  in  1887,  filling  in  the  meantime  successful 
pastorates  at  the  Pandora  Avenue  church,  Victoria,  and  at  New  Westminster. 
In  response  to  a  hearty  invitation  from  Central  church,  Toronto,  he  then  returned 
to  Ontario,  where  he  spent  three  years.  But  his  heart  was  in  the  west  and  he 
gladly  acceded  to  the  warm  request  of  the  people  of  his  old  charge  in  Victoria 
who  were  about  to  open  their  magnificent  new  church,  of  which  he  became  the 
first  pastor.  Of  his  work  in  the  Metropolitan  church,  Homer  street,  Vancouver, 
and  in  a  second  appointment  to  New  Westminster,  it  is  needless  to  write. 
Thousands  can  testify  to  his  power  as  a  preacher,  his  fidelity  as  a  pastor  and 
his  love  and  sympathy  as  a  friend. 

For  several  years  it  had  been  apparent  to  all  that  Rev.  Watson's  health  was 
seriously  impaired,  but  he  maintained  his  labors  with  wonderful  persistency  and 
courage.  Indeed,  for  a  time  his  strength  appeared  to  increase,  when  appendi- 
citis ensued.  An  operation  was  performed  but  his  enfeebled  body  could  not 


REV.  COVERDALE  WATSOX 


BRITISH    COLUMBIA  201 

withstand  the  shock.  He  sank  rapidly  and  three  days  later,  on  February  21, 
1898,  his  sanctified  spirit  was  released  from  its  earthly  tabernacle  and  mortality 
was  changed  for  life. 

Rev.  Watson  was  united  in  marriage  in  1881  to  Miss  Mary  Nichols,  daughter 
of  the  late  Rev.  Matthew  Nichols,  of  Brampton.  The  marriage  was  a  most 
happy  one  and  his  widow,  with  three  children,  survives  to  mourn  her  irreparable 
loss. 

Coverdale  Watson  was  a  man  of  large  and  varied  gifts.  His  life  as  a  student 
was  marked  by  thoroughness  and  his  reading,  especially  along  theological  lines, 
was  extensive  and  discriminating.  He  was  naturally  an  investigator  and  pos- 
sessed a  decidedly  metaphysical  mind  which  delighted  in  pursuing  a  subject  to 
its  ultimate  analysis.  No  man  was  more  keen  in  detecting  or  more  merciless  in 
exposing  a  fallacy.  He  could  be  severe  in  denouncing  the  specious  and  false 
maxims  by  which  current  evils  are  defended  or  wrong  principles  maintained. 
His  preaching  was  intellectual  and  his  sermons  were  marked  by  powerful  appeals 
to  the  conscience,  delivered  in  a  manner  and  with  a  tone  that  rendered  them 
peculiarly  impressive.  Intense  spirituality,  fearlessness  and  faithfulness  char- 
acterized his  pulpit  efforts.  He  recognized  vividly  the  high  standard  of  scriptural 
holiness  which  Christianity  demands  and  earnestly  pressed  believers  to  its  attain- 
ment. As  a  man  he  was  upright,  as  a  Christian  saintly,  strong  in  faith  and 
mighty  in  intercession,  as  a  friend  tender,  faithful  and  charitable,  as  a  minister 
dignified,  earnest  and  successful.  He  held  a  very  warm  place  in  the  affection 
and  esteem  of  his  brethren,  by  whom  his  memory  will  long  be  cherished. 
The  conference  was  bereaved  of  one  of  its  most  beloved  and  honored  members 
and  the  Methodist  church  of  one  of  its  foremost  preachers  and  pastors  by  his 
death.  There  was  something  unique  about  his  friendships  and  one  of  the 
choicest  spirits  animating  those  days  and  pulsing  so  winsomely  through  those 
associations  was  the  beautiful  spirit  of  Brother  Watson.  "We  sorrow  not  as 
those  who  have  no  hope."  "He  was  not,  for  God  took  him."  One  more  of  the 
militant  host  whose  ranks  are  multiplying  in  every  land  has  joined  the  disembodied 
throngs  who  unceasingly  celebrate  the  praises  of  the  Lamb  in  the  anthems  of  the 
skies. 

"Oh,  may  we  triumph  so 

When  all  our  warfare's  past, 
And  dying  find  our  latest  foe 
Under  our  feet  at  last." 


MALCOLM  McBEATH. 

Malcolm  McBeath  has  the  distinction  of  being  the  youngest  man  ever  elected 
to  the  city  council  of  Vancouver.  He  is,  moreover,  a  very  successful  business 
man  and  has  risen  to  his  present  position  of  prosperity  and  prominence  through 
his  own  labors  and  native  ability,  for  he  had  few  advantages  in  his  early  youth. 
He  was  born  in  Allenford,  Bruce  county,  Ontario,  December  2,  1880,  a  son  of 
Thomas  and  Lena  (Foisie)  McBeath,  the  former  a  native  of  Scotland  and  the 
latter  of  Ontario.  The  father  was  a  farmer  by  profession  and  for  many  years 
lived  near  Allenford,  but  in  1892  removed  to  Manitoba,  settling  at  Portage  la 
Prairie,  where  he  engaged  in  farming  until  1907. 

Malcolm  McBeath  was  not  yet  twelve  years  of  age  at  the  time  of  his  parents' 
removal  to  Portage  la  Prairie,  and  he  there  entered  upon  his  business  career, 
being  Apprenticed  to  the  printer's  trade  in  1894)  when  fourteen  years  of  age. 
He  was  articled  to  James  Hooper,  now  king's  printer  for  Manitoba.  After  he 
had  served  for  about  two  years  of  that  time  the  late  John  Cornyn  bought  out 
Mr.  Hooper.  Mr.  McBeath  completed  his  apprenticeship  and  a  little  later  ac- 
quired an  interest  in  the  business,  with  which  he  was  continuously  connected  in 
partnership  with  Mr.  Cornyn  until  June,  1905,  when  they  sold  out,  Mr.  Cornyn 


202  BRITISH    COLUMBIA 

coming  to  Vancouver,  while  Mr.  McBeath  went  to  Winnipeg.  The  latter  there 
entered  the  real-estate  business,  in  which  he  continued  in  that  city  until  August, 
1907,  when  he  came  to  Vancouver.  In  the  meantime  Mr.  Cornyn  had  been  quite 
successful  here  and  had  acquired  a  gratifying  fortune.  Mr.  McBeath  again 
became  his  partner,  but  six  weeks  later,  while  diving  at  English  Bay,  Mr.  Cornyn 
was  killed.  The  whole  responsibility  of  the  extensive  business  of  the  firm  there- 
fore devolved  upon  Mr.  McBeath.  He  became  very  active  in  the  real-estate 
business,  in  which  he  has  since  continued,  and  is  today  a  foremost  factor  in  real- 
estate  circles  in  Vancouver.  While  residing  in  Winnipeg  Mr.  McBeath  bought  a 
tract  of  one  hundred  acres  in  the  Hastings  Townsite  (Vancouver)  which  he  sub- 
divided and  sold  in  lots  in  1907-8.  In  1904  the  Pacific  Loan  Company  was 
organized  by  Mr.  Cornyn  and  in  1907,  upon  his  death,  Mr.  McBeath  became  presi- 
dent and  managing  director,  which  dual  position  he  still  fills.  At  the  same  time 
he  became  connected  with  the  Northern  Securities,  Ltd.,  of  which  he  is  the 
secretary.  He  thus  figures  prominently  in  business  and  financial  circles  and  his 
name  is  an  honored  one  on  commercial  paper.  He  has  gained  for  himself  recog- 
nition as  a  man  of  sound  judgment  and  indefatigable  enterprise  and  each  year 
finds  him  in  advance  of  the  position  which  he  occupied  the  previous  year. 

Not  only  has  Mr.  McBeath  made  a  splendid  record  in  business,  but  has  also 
become  a  recognized  factor  in  local  political  circles.  In  1911  he  was  elected  a 
member  of  the  city  council  as  an  alderman  from  the  seventh  ward,  which  is  the 
Hastings  Townsite  addition,  and  it  was  in  that  year  that  the  section  was  annexed 
to  the  city.  In  1913  Mr.  McBeath  was  appointed  chairman  of  the  Associated 
Charities  committee.  This  committe  has  charge  of  the  building  of  the  Old 
People's  Home,  which  is  situated  on  a  fourteen-acre  tract  in  the  Hastings  Town- 
site,  which  in  1912  was  acquired  from  the  government  for  city  purposes.  The 
committee  also  has  under  its  supervision  the  erecton  of  the  creche  in  the  west 
end  of  the  city,  on  Hero  street,  which  will  be  a  day  nursery  and  a  home  for 
foundlings.  Mr.  McBeath  is  also  chairman  of  the  annexation  committee  and  is 
a  prominent  working  member  of  the  council. 

In  September,  1903,  in  Winnipeg,  Manitoba,  was  celebrated  the  marriage  of 
Mr.  McBeath  and  Miss  Bessie  McFarlane  of  that  city,  and  unto  them  have  been 
born  two  children,  Hazel  and  Morris.  In  his  fraternal  relations  Mr.  McBeath  is 
a  Mason,  holding  membership  in  Acacia  Lodge.  This  in  brief  is  the  life  history 
of  one  of  Vancouver's  prominent  and  rising  young  men,  who  has  already  attained 
to  a  notable  position  for  one  of  his  years.  There  is  no  esoteric  phase  in  his  life 
history,  and  his  record  indicates  what  can  be  accomplished  when  one  is  enterpris- 
ing, determined  and  cognizant  of  his  own  capacities  and  powers. 


MAJOR  CHARLES  McMILLAN. 

Major  Charles  McMillan,  who  since  1906  has  been  engaged  in  the  real-estate 
and  investment  business  in  Vancouver,  was  born  in  Toronto,  Ontario,  February 
,14,  1865,  his  parents  being  Robert  and  Annie  (Roy)  McMillan,  both  of  whom 
were  natives  of  Scotland.  Coming  to  America,  they  resided  for  an  extended 
period  in  Toronto,  where  for  some  years  the  father  engaged  in  the  banking  busi- 
ness, but  both  he  and  his  wife  are  now  deceased. 

In  the  acquirement  of  his  education  Major  Charles  McMillan  attended  the 
public  and  high  schools  of  Toronto  and  in  1882,  when  a  youth  of  seventeen  years, 
started  westward  with  Winnipeg  as  his  destination.  His  initial  step  in  the  busi- 
ness world  was  made  in  Manitoba  and  later  he  engaged  with  the  Canada  North- 
west Land  Company  as  town  site  clerk,  while  subsequently  he  became  agent  for 
the  Calgary  town  site  trustees  and  sold  all  of  that  town  site  for  them.  With  the 
early  development  and  upbuilding  of  Calgary  he  was  thus  closely  associated  and 
for  twelve  years  he  filled  the  positions  of  city  clerk  and  treasurer  of  Calgary, 
making  a  most  commendable  record  in  office  by  reason  of  his  capability  and  faith- 


MAJOR  CHARLES  McMILLAN 


BRITISH    COLUMBIA  205 

fulness.  In  1906  he  came  to  Vancouver,  where  he  has  since  confined  his  attention 
to  real-estate  and  investments,  building  up  a  gratifying  business  in  this  connection. 
He  has  thoroughly  acquainted  himself  with  property  values  and  aside  from 
handling  real-estate  has  made  large  investments  for  clients,  knowing  fully  the 
value  of  commercial  paper  or  financial  brokerage  interests. 

On  the  24th  of  April,  1889,  in  Winnipeg,  Mr.  .McMillan  was  united  in  mar- 
riage to  Miss  M-ay  Agnes  McGuire,  of  that  city,  ajid  they  have  one  daughter, 
Clyde  Irene,  the  wife  of  Pervis  E.  Ritchie,  of  the  Ritchie  Construction  &  Supply 
Company  of  Vancouver.  During  their  residence  in  Vancouver  Major  McMillan 
and  his  wife  have  gained  many  warm  friends  and  the  hospitality  of  a  large 
number  of  the  best  homes  of  the  city  is  freely  accorded  them.  Major  McMillan 
was  with  the  Ninetieth  Regiment  of  Winnipeg  Rifles  for  five  years  and  at  Calgary 
was  major  of  A  squadron  in  the  Fifteenth  Regiment  of  Light  Horse  for  five 
years,  and  during  the  Riel  rebellion  and  holds  a  medal  for  services  there.  His 
fraternal  relations  are  with  the  Masons,  in  Perfection  Lodge  of  Calgary,  and  the 
Odd  Fellows,  and  his  religious  faith  is  that  of  the  Presbyterian  church.  He 
belongs  to  that  class  which  stands  for  all  that  is  progressive  in  citizenship,  and 
his  support  can  be  counted  upon  for  any  movement  which  is  a  matter  of  civic  vir- 
tue or  civic  pride. 


CHARLES  A.  SLANEY. 

The  rapid  progress  and  ever  changing  conditions  of  modern  life  have  brought 
about  specialization  in  many  branches,  and  many  ordinary  fields  of  labor  have 
been  lifted  to  the  dignity  of  sciences.  Charles  A.  Slaney  is  one  of  those  who  has 
attained  prominence  in  one  special  line  of  work  and  as  auditor  of  the  British 
Columbia  Electric  Company,  of  Vancouver,  occupies  a  foremost  position  in  his 
profession.  Born  on  February  8,  1881,  at  Oakengates,  England,  he  is  a  son  of 
Ambrose  John  and  Amy  Slaney,  both  of  whom  still  make  their  home  in  the 
mother  country,  the  father  living  retired. 

Charles  A.  Slaney  received  his  education  at  Newport  College  in  Shropshire, 
England,  and  at  the  age  of  sixteen  engaged  with  the  Lilleshall  Company  as  junior 
accountant,  remaining  in  that  connection  for  two  years.  His  next  position  was 
with  the  Northwestern  Railway  of  England,  in  which  connection  he  was  assistant 
freight  accountant  for  a  period  of  two  years.  He  then  was  employed  by  the 
Birmingham  corporation  as  auditor,  remaining  thus  for  five  years,  at  the  end  of 
which  time,  in  1906,  he  decided  to  test  the  opportunities  of  the  new  world  and, 
coming  to  British  Columbia,  entered  upon  a  position  with  the  Canadian  Pacific 
Railroad  as  accountant  on  the  third  Pacific  division.  He  so  remained  until  1910, 
when  he  was  appointed  accountant  of  the  Vancouver  Power  Company,  becoming 
subsequently  district  auditor  for  the  British  Columbia  Electric  Company  and  then 
general  accountant  for  the  same  firm.  The  position  is  now  that  of  auditor. 
Having  gathered  wide  and  varied  experience,  Mr.  Slaney  is  a  young  man  who 
readily  makes  himself  master  of  new  conditions  and  with  his  ready  mind  easily 
penetrates  the  most  problematical  business  situations.  He  is  not  only  an  auditor 
and  accountant  in  the  ordinary  meaning  of  the  word  but  has  learned  to  understand 
business  procedures  and  business  growth  to  such  an  extent  that  he  readily  sees 
where  remedies  ought  to  be  applied  or  improvements  ought  to  be  made.  His 
services  in  connection  with  the  British  Columbia  Electric  Company  are  invaluable 
to  that  concern  and  he  has  received  many  tokens  of  high  commendation  from 
the  officers  of  his  firm. 

In  1901  Mr.  Slaney  was  united  in  marriage  to  Miss  Theresa  Hall,  a  daughter 
of  Air.  and  Mrs.  Benjamin  Hall,  of  Birmingham,  England.  In  their  family  are 
'iree  children,  Charles,  Reginald  and  Allan,  the  oldest  of  whom  is  attending 
niblic  school.  The  family  residence  is  located  at  Strathcona  place,  and  there 
'Tr.  and  Mrs.  Slaney  often  entertain  a  charming  circle  of  friends.  The  former 


206  BRITISH    COLUMBIA 

gives  his  allegiance  in  political  matters  to  the  conservative  party  and  in  religious 
faith  adheres  to  the  Congregational  cKurch.  He  seeks  recreation  from  his  oner- 
ous and  confining  duties  in  gardening,  shooting  and  fishing.  An  aggressive  young 
man  who  deeply  interests  himself  in  his  surroundings  and  the  growth  of  his 
home  city,  he  takes  laudable  interest  in  all  enterprises  promoted  for  the  public 
welfare  and  is  never  lagging  behind  if  time  or  money  are  needed  in  the  advance- 
ment of  a  public  cause. 


THOMAS  T.  DAUPHINEE. 

Thomas  T.  Dauphinee,  of  Vancouver,  was  one  of  the  incorporators  in  1911 
of  Pretty's  Timber  Exchange,  Ltd.,  a  company  second  to  none  in  the  extent  and 
importance  of  its  operations  as  timber  merchants  of  the  northwest.  Since  1901 
he  has  been  a  resident  of  British  Columbia  and  since  1908  of  Vancouver.  He 
was  born  in  Petite  Riviere,  Lunenburg  county,  Nova  Scotia,  September  14,  1879, 
a  son  of  Captain  Thomas  and  Alice  A.  (Drew)  Dauphinee.  The  father  was  a 
native  of  Bedford,  Nova  Scotia,  but  in  early  life  went  to  Petite  Riviere,  where 
he  resided  until  1883,  when  he  removed  to  Liverpool,  Nova  Scotia,  where  his 
death  occurred  in  1899.  He  was  a  deep  sea  captain,  spending  the  greater  part  of 
his  life  upon  the  water. 

In  graded  and  high  schools  of  Liverpool,  Nova  Scotia,  Thomas  T.  Dauphinee 
pursued  his  education  and  after  his  graduation  from  the  high  school  made  his 
initial  step  in  the  business  world  as  a  clerk  in  the  Union  Bank  of  Halifax,  where 
he  continued  for  a  year.  He  then  resumed  his  education  in  1898  by  entering 
Dalhousie  University  at  Halifax,  where  he  spent  a  year.  In  1901  he  arrived 
in  British  Columbia,  attracted  by  what  he  believed  to  be  broader  business 
opportunities  and  better  advantages  on  the  Pacific  coast.  He  entered  the  employ 
of  the  John  A.  Lee  Furniture  Company  at  New  Westminster,  continuing  in  that 
business  connection  until  1904,  when  he  became  associated  with  Thomas  R. 
Pearson,  in  the  real-estate  and  insurance  business  in  New  Westminster.  When 
that  business  was  merged  into  the  newly  organized  Dominion  Trust  Company 
he  remained  with  the  latter  and  was  so  engaged  until  1908,  when  he  became 
associated  with  Charles  F.  Pretty  in  the  timber  business.  This  business  was 
founded  by  Mr.  Pretty  in  1903  and  was  incorporated  in  1911  under  the  name 
of  Pretty's  Timber  Exchange,  Ltd.,  with  a  capital  of  five  million  dollars,  Mr. 
Dauphinee  becoming  managing  director.  The  company  makes  investments  in 
large  tracts  of  timber  land,  is  interested  also  in  the  consolidation  of  small  hold- 
ings and  in  the  sale  of  the  same.  They  employ  a  large  force  of  men  and  a  staff 
of  experts,  and  make  all  necessary  investigation  as  to  the  possibilities  of  the  land, 
transportation  fa'cilities  and  other  questions  and  problems  arising  in  connection 
with  this  business  in  all  of  its  ramifying  and  varied  trade  relations.  They  own 
an  extensive  acreage  of  limits  throughout  the  province  of  British  Columbia. 
Mr.  Dauphinee  as  managing  director  of  the  company  is  probably  as  well  versed 
concerning  the  timber  situation  of  the  province  as  any  man  within  its  borders. 
He  also  has  other  extensive  financial  interests,  being  a  director  of  Pearson's 
Ltd. ;  a  director  of  the  Northwest  Canada  Trust  Company,  Ltd. ;  president  of  the 
Capilano  Rock  &  Gravel  Company,  Ltd. ;  secretary  of  the  Vancouver  Dock  & 
Harbor  Extension  Company,  Ltd.;  secretary-treasurer  of  the  Hardscrabble 
Hydraulic  Gold  Mines,  Ltd. ;  director  of  the  Greater  Vancouver  Company,  Ltd., 
and  has  connection  with  various  other  interests. 

On  the  8th  of  April,  1912,  Mr.  Dauphinee  was  married  to  Miss  Eva  B. 
McCaul,  a  daughter  of  John  McCaul,  of  Vancouver.  In  politics  he  is  inde- 
pendent and  his  fraternal  relations  are  with  the  Independent  Order  of  Odd 
Fellows.  He  is  preeminently  a  business  man,  one  capable  of  organizing  and 
controlling  important  interests.  He  has  given  proof  of  his  power  to  coordinate 
seemingly  diverse  and  complex  interests  into  a  unified  and  harmonious  whole. 


THOMAS  T.  DAUPHINEE 


BRITISH    COLUMBIA  209 

His  rise  in  the  business  world  has  been  notably  rapid  for  he  is  now  only  thirty- 
four  years  of  age,  yet  he  is  at  the  head  or  connected  with  some  of  the  most 
important  commercial  and  financial  enterprises  of  the  province.  Moreover,  his 
work  is  constituting  an  important  element  in  the  development  of  the  resources 
of  British  Columbia,  bringing  about  splendid  growth  and  progress  and  placing 
this  section  of  the  country  on  a  par  with  the  older  east  in  all  of  its  advantages  and 
opportunities.  One  can  scarcely  measure  the  importance  of  his  life  work.  There 
have  been  no  esoteric  chapters  in  his  history;  on  the  contrary,  the  record  is  an 
open  book  which  all  may  read,  and  the  lessons  therein  contained  may  be  profit- 
ably followed  showing  what  may  be  accomplished  when  one  has  the  will  to  dare 
and  to  do  and  is  not  afraid  to  venture  where  favoring  opportunity  leads  the  way. 


THOMAS  S.  ANNANDALE. 

For  twenty  years  Thomas  S.  Annandale  was  prominently  connected  with 
mercantile  circles  in  New  Westminster,  conducting  with  rare  ability  extensive 
grocery  establishments,  which  he  disposed  of  in  December,  1911,  and  is  now 
giving  his  time  to  the  management  of  his  extensive  interests,  including  city  realty, 
farm  holdings  and  investments  in  other  enterprises.  He  was  born  in  Forfar- 
shire,  Scotland,  on  March  9,  1864,  his  parents  being  Robert  B.  and  Ellen  (Sturch) 
Annandale,  both  natives  of  that  country.  In  the  late  '6os  they  removed  to 
England,  where  the  father  passed  the  remainder  of  his  life,  his  death  occurring 
on  January  30,  1913,  at  the  age  of  eighty-three  years,  the  mother  having  preceded 
him  in  death  on  May  24,  1908,  at  the  age  of  seventy-three.  Robert  B.  Annan- 
dale  was  for  many  years  manager  of  the  estates  of  the  duke  of  Westminster  and 
various  other  large  properties. 

Thomas  S.  Annandale  was  reared  amid  the  influences  of  a  cultured  home, 
acquiring  his  education  in  the  grammar  schools  of  Market  Drayton  and  Chester, 
England.  Upon  reaching  young  manhood  he  became  an  assistant  in  his  father's 
office,  where  he  remained  until  1891,  when  the  opportunities  offered  in  the  Cana- 
dian west  decided  him  to  come  to  Vancouver,  British  Columbia,  which  was  then 
but  a  small  town.  The  enterprises  in  the  town  were  yet  in  their  infancy  and  there 
seemed  little  to  do  for  an  ambitious  young  man,  Mr.  Annandale  having  to  content 
himself  with  playing  "boss"  over  three  Chinamen  who  were  set  to  assorting 
potatoes.  Seeing  no  immediate  prospects  in  Vancouver,  he  remained  but  four 
months  and  then  came  to  New  Westminster,  where  he  bought  a  part  interest  in 
the  grocery  business  of  William  and  George  Wolfenden  and  in  1893  acquired  his 
partner's  share,  becoming  sole  owner.  From  that  time  he  conducted  the  business 
independently  but  in  1898  suffered  a  severe  reverse  when  his  store  was  destroyed 
by  fire,  it  being  the  first  building  to  burn  on  the  main  street  during  the  conflagra- 
tion. Undaunted  by  his  misfortune,  however,  Mr.  Annandale  gave  a  splendid 
demonstration  of  his  aggressive  spirit  and  enterprise  by  opening  business  the 
following  morning  on  the  street  without  a  roof  over  his  head,  ordering  a  special 
car  to  be  brought  from  Vancouver  loaded  with  a  new  stock  of  goods.  He  soon 
had  established  himself  on  a  vacant  lot,  on  the  site  which  is  now  occupied  by 
le  city  library,  and  here  he  later  built  a  small  shack  and  continued  in  business 
for  several  months  until  he  could  secure  store  room  in  the  Begbie  block.  As 
lis  sales  increased  he  made  several  removals  and  continued  successfully  in  the 
grocery  business  until  December  7,  1911,  when  he  disposed  of  his  two  stores  to 
jood  advantage,  his  years  of  activity  having  brought  him  prosperity.  His  suc- 
:ess  must  largely  be  attributed  to  his  honorable  and  fair  methods,  his  understand- 
ing of  the  business  and  his  earnest  efforts  to  please  his  customers.  In  April, 
[912,  Mr.  Annandale  and  his  family  realized  a  long-cherished  dream  by  making 
in  extended  trip  to  England,  remaining  for  six  months  in  the  mother  country 
md  visiting  places  of  old  associations  and  historic  interest.  Since  his  return  he 
is  given  his  attention  to  the  management  of  his  various  holdings,  being  also 


210  BRITISH    COLUMBIA 

engaged  in  the  loan  and  mortgage  business.  He  owns  a  valuable  farm  at  Chilli- 
wack,  in  which  he  takes  a  great  interest  and  from  which  he  derives  great  pleasure. 
To  its  cultivation  he  gives  much  of  his  attention  and  substantial  rewards  have 
come  to  him  as  the  result  of  his  labors.  Moreover,  he  is  a  director  of  the  New 
Westminster  Trust  Company,  with  which  the  family  has  been  connected  for 
many  years,  it  being  the  oldest  company  of  that  kind  in  the  province. 

In  1887  Mr.  Annandale  married  Miss  Sarah  Crowder,  of  Shropshire,  Eng- 
land, and  her  death  occurred  in  1905.  To  this  union  were  born  four  children: 
Beatrice,  at  home ;  Lindsay,  of  Stewart  Lake,  British  Columbia ;  and  Thomas  and 
Arthur,  also  at  home.  In  August,  1907,  Mr.  Annandale  married  Miss  Violet 
Pyne,  of  Devonshire,  England,  who  bore  him  two  children,  Mary  and  Kenneth. 

Public-spirited  and  progressive,  Mr.  Annandale  interests  himself  in  all  move- 
ments undertaken  to  promote  the  betterment  of  the  people  along  material  or 
intellectual  lines.  For  many  years  he  has  served  as  justice  of  the  peace,  render- 
ing impartial  and  fair  decisions  which  have  established  his  reputation  as  one  of 
the  most  just  men  in  his  city.  As  president  of  the  Westminster  Club  he  guides 
and  cherishes  the  spirit  of  expansion  in  the  city,  standing  ever  ready  to  bear  his 
share  in  time  and  money  in  promoting  any  worthy  enterprise.  He  and  his  family 
are  devout  members  of  the  Church  of  England,  in  which  they  take  an  active  and 
helpful  interest.  Fraternally  he  is  affiliated  with  the  Masons,  being  a  member 
of  Lewis  Lodge,  A.  F.  &  A.  M.  As  the  years  have  passed  Mr.  Annandale  has 
attained  to  a  foremost  position  in  his  community  and  has  become  recognized  as 
one  of  its  forceful  elements,  his  sterling  traits  of  character  having  won  for  him 
the  high  regard  and  confidence  of  all  who  have  come  into  contact  with  him. 


ALEXANDER  MORRISON. 

Among  the  real  upbnilders  and  promoters  of  British  Columbia,  among  the 
men  whose  initiative  spirit,  organizing  power,  industry  and  unfaltering  deter- 
mination have  constituted  forceful  factors  in  provincial  growth,  among  the  pro- 
moters of  business  enterprises  and  the  founders  of  industrial  institutions  is  num- 
bered Alexander  Morrison,  of  Armstrong,  Morrison  &  Company,  Limited,  gen- 
eral contractors  of  Vancouver.  Through  a  period  of  activity  in  this  line  of 
work,  extending  from  1881  to  the  present  time,  he  has  become  identified  with 
some  of  the  most  important  engineering  and  contracting  work  in  the  Dominion, 
has  built  public  institutions,  industrial  plants,  bridges  and  railroads  and  in  so 
doing  has  gained  prominence  and  success,  standing  today  among  the  leading  men 
of  affairs  in  Vancouver,  where  he  makes  his  home. 

Mr.  Morrison  was  born  in  Motherwell,  Scotland,  on  the  igth  of  June,  1852, 
and  is  a  son  of  Donald  and  Margaret  (Ralston)  Morrison,  the  former  a  native 
of  Argyleshire  and  the  latter  of  Lanark  county,  Scotland.  The  father  resided  at 
Motherwell  for  many  years,  acting  as  a  mine  manager,  and  in  that  city  his  death 
occurred.  His  wife  afterward,  in  1875,  came  to  Canada,  and  died  at  Ottawa 
when  she  was  eighty-five  years  of  age. 

Alexander  Morrison  acquired  his  education  in  the  public  schools  of  his  native 
community  and  there  he  afterward  served  a  five  years'  apprenticeship  to  the 
builder's  and  millwright's  trades,  mastering  these  occupations  in  principle  and 
detail  and  thus  early  laying  the  foundation  of  his  future  great  success.  After 
serving  the  required  term  he  went  to  Govan,  on  the  Clyde,  and  there  followed 
shipbuilding  from  1869  to  1871,  after  which  he  turned  his  attention  to  general 
contracting.  He  came  to  Canada  in  1871  and  resumed  his  occupation  as  a  con- 
"tractor,  a  business  in  which  he  has  been  active  and  successful  since  that  time. 
At  first  he  devoted  his  time  mainly  to  the  erection  of  industrial  plants  and  many 
of  the  buildings  which  house  the  most  important  business  concerns  in  eastern 
Canada  are  the  products  of  his  skill  and  labor,  prominent  among  these  being 
the  Magog  Textile  Mills  at  Magog,  Quebec.  In  1891  Mr.  Morrison  came  west 


ALEXANDER  MORRISON 


BRITISH    COLUMBIA  213 

to  British  Columbia  and  in  New  Westminster  became  associated  with  Dan 
McGillivray  and  W.  H.  Armstrong  in  the  building  of  the  city  waterworks  sys- 
tem, Mr.  Morrison  being  superintendent  of  their  steel  pipe  department.  In  the 
following  year  he  formed  a  partnership  with  Mr.  Armstrong  and  they  thus 
began  an  association  which  has  been  productive  of  excellent  results  to  the  present 
time.  The  partners  purchased  the  McGillivray  plant  at  New  Westminster  and 
moved  it  to  Vancouver,  upon  the  old  site  of  the  Vancouver  foundry,  where  they 
conducted  an  immense  machine  shop  and  pipe  manufacturing  plant.  Both  being 
well  known  in  industrial  circles  as  men  of  unusual  ability  and  enterprise,  they 
rapidly  became  identified  with  a  great  deal  of  important  work,  their  first  contract 
being  for  the  construction  of  a  huge  water  main  from  Main  street  to  the  reser- 
voir in  Stanley  Park,  and  they  later  completed  the  system  from  the  narrows  to 
the  dam.  In  October,  1897,  they  began  the  construction  of  the  railroad  from 
Moyie  lake  to  Kootenay  Landing,  including  a  long  trestle  at  the  head  of  Kootenay 
lake  and  a  transfer  slip.  This  was  completed  within  a  year  and  is  known  as 
Crow's  Nest  division  of  the  Canadian  Pacific  Railway.  With  the  expansion  of 
their  business  they  began  the  manufacture  of  mining  machinery  and  they  made 
and  installed  some  of  the  largest  hydraulic  mining  plants  ever  used  in  British 
Columbia,  among  them  being  the  equipment  for  the  Horse  Fly  gold  mines  on  the 
Horse  Fly  river,  the  Bullion  mines  at  Quesnel  and  many  others  of  lesser  im- 
portance. In  1901  they  sold  this  plant  to  the  Vancouver  Engineering  Company 
and  started  in  the  street  building  and  paving  business  in  Vancouver,  this  enter- 
prise proving  as  important  and  profitable  as  their  previous  business.  They  have 
paved  many  of  the  principal  thoroughfares  in  the  city  with  creosote  blocks  and 
bituminous  rock  and  following  the  completion  of  this  work  in  1902  they  turned 
their  attention  to  bridge  building,  a  special  line  of  work  in  which  they  have 
attained  great  distinction,  the  company's  name  being  coupled  with  the  successful 
completion  of  important  bridge  construction  work  throughout  the  province.  They 
built  the  bridge  across  the  Fraser  river  at  New  Westminster  for  the  provincial 
government  and  the  partners  count  this  among  their  most  distinguished  ac- 
complishments since  their  association  because  of  the  remarkable  feats  of  engineer- 
ing which  were  necessary  before  all  the  difficulties  could  be  overcome  and  the 
work  completed.  Against  two  diverse  currents  they  were  obliged  to  sink  some  of 
the  deepest  piers  in  the  world,  one  measuring  one  hundred  and  forty  feet  below 
water  surface,  a  pier  in  Australia  one  hundred  and  forty-one  feet  deep  being  its 
only  rival.  They  have  since  built  the  Canadian  Northern  Railway  bridge  across 
False  creek,  the  Granville  street  and  Main  street  bridges  in  Vancouver,  a  govern- 
ment bridge  across  the  Columbia  river  at  Trail,  British  Columbia,  five  across  the 
Thompson  river  for  tire  Canadian  Northern  Railway  and  two  across  the  Fraser  for 
the  same  corporation.  These  seven  last  mentioned  bridges  were  begun  at  the 
same  time,  in  August,  1912,  and  all  were  completed  early  in  May,  1913,  the 
rapidity  with  which  the  work  was  accomplished  requiring  the  maintenance  of  a 
large  plant  in  the  building  of  each  structure.  From  the  importance  of  the  work 
with  which  Armstrong,  Morrison  &  Company,  Limited,  have  been  entrusted  may 
be  judged  to  some  extent  its  standing  in  industrial  circles,  the  prominence  of  its 
members,  the  prestige  of  its  name.  Its  continued  success  has  been  founded  on 
the  harmony  which  exists  between  its  members — a  harmony  which  since  1892 
has  made  the  life  of  one  of  the  partners  virtually  the  life  of  the  other,  so  closely 
have  they  been  associated  and  with  such  success  have  they  worked  together. 
In  1897  W.  C.  Ditmars  entered  their  employ  and  in  1903  was  admitted  to  a  part- 
nership and  in  the  same  year  Robert  Armstrong  also  joined  the  firm.  The  ac- 
tivities of  these  four  men  have  been  of  such  a  nature  that  they  have  been  insepa- 
rably connected  with  provincial  upbuilding,  their  names  standing  among  the 
makers  of  provincial  history  and  their  work  forming  one  of  the  elements  in  the 
greatness  and  growth  of  the  city  of  Vancouver.  Naturally  a  man  of  Mr.  Morri- 
son's force  of  personality,  ability  and  high  position  has  been  carried  forwa'rd  in 
the  course  of  years  into  important  relations  with  the  general  business  life  and 
he  has  become  connected  with  a  great  many  representative  business  institutions, 


214  BRITISH    COLUMBIA 

being  a  director  in  the  Clayburn  Company,  of  Clayburn,  British  Columbia,  the 
Vancouver  Granite  Company  and  the  Keremeos  Land  Company.  He  belongs  to 
the  Vancouver  Board  of  Trade  and  is  always  to  be  found  among  the  leaders  in 
the  promotion  of  projects  of  civic  development  and  growth. 

On  the  pth  of  June,  1876,  Mr.  Morrison  was  united  in  marriage  to  Miss  Mar- 
garet Birnie,  of  Glasgow,  Scotland,  and  they  have  one  son,  Donald  R.,  who  is 
in  business  in  Vancouver.  Mr.  Morrison  is  a  member  of  St.  John's  Presbyterian 
church  and  from  1910  to  1912  served  as  president  of  both  the  Caledonian  and 
the  Gaelic  Societies.  He  has  sought  and  found  much  recreation  in  extensive 
travel.  In  Montreal  he  served  for  nine  years  with  the  Royal  Scots  of  that  city. 
He  gives  his  political  allegiance  to  the  conservative  party  and  in  1910  was  defeated 
for  the  office  of  mayor  of  Vancouver,  the  large  vote  which  he  polled,  however, 
evidencing  his  popularity  and  prominence.  In  the  course  of  a  business  career  in 
this  city  covering  twenty-one  years  his  contributions  to  municipal  development 
have  been  many  and  substantial  and  his  name  stands  as  a  synonym  for  progress, 
advancement  and  growth.  He  is  numbered  among  the  real  builders  of  the  city, 
among  those  who  build  for  all  time,  making  their  work  of  inestimable  present 
value  and  setting  a  high  standard  for  those  who  follow  after. 


STUART  LIVINGSTON. 

Stuart  Livingston  who  was  called  to  the  bar  in  1889,  has  been  in  practice  in 
Vancouver  since  1899.  He  is  the  son  of  Thomas  C.  and  Belvidera  (Warner) 
Livingston,  both  of  whom  were  natives  of  Ontario,  and  received  his  early  educa- 
tion in  the  public  schools  in  Hamilton  and  was  later  graduated  from  Toronto 
University  with  the  degree  of  Bachelor  of  Laws  in  1889.  The  same  year  he  was 
called  to  the  bar  and  immediately  afterwards  entered  upon  active  practice  in 
Hamilton  in  which  he  continued  until  1899,  when  he  removed  to  Vancouver 
and  was  called  to  the  bar  of  British  Columbia,  his  firm  at  the  present  time  being 
known  as  Livingston,  Garrett  King  &  O'Dell.  In  his  early  years  Mr.  Livingston 
devoted  some  time  to  art  and  literature. 

Mr.  Livingston  was  married  to  Miss  Maud  Chrysler  of  Hamilton  and  they 
have  three  children,  Garrett,  Eleanor  and  David.  He  is  a  member  of  the  Van- 
couver, Terminal  City,  Jockey  and  Jericho  Country  Clubs.  He  is  a  member  of 
the  Masonic  order  and  a  conservative  in  politics. 


F.   THOMAS   COPE. 

The  growth  of  Vancouver  is  one  of  the  miracles  of  the  west.  Results  have 
been  accomplished  in  an  astonishingly  short  space  of  time,  making  this  one  of 
the  metropolitan  cities  of  the  coast,  with  its  ramifying  trade  and  business  inter- 
ests reaching  out  in  all  directions.  Every  line  of  activity,  almost,  is  here  repre- 
sented and  at  the  head  of  business  enterprises  are  men  of  marked  energy  and 
determination  who  are  making  use  of  their  opportunities  and  are  contributing  to 
the  growth  and  upbuilding  of  the  city  as  well  as  to  individual  success.  Such  a 
man  is  found  in  F.  T.  Cope,  president  of  the  firm  of  Cope  &  Son,  Ltd.,  dealers 
in  electrical  supplies.  He  was  born  in  Oxford,  England,  July  9,  1860,  and  is  a. 
son  of  Thomas  and  Amelia  Cope,  the  former  an  officer  in  the  English  army.  At 
the  usual  age  the  son  entered  the  public  schools  of  his  native  city  and  continued 
his  education  until  he  had  mastered  the  high-school  branches.  His  arrival  in 
Canada  occurred  in  the  year  1879,  at  which  time  he  took  up  his  abode  in  Mani- 
toba. '  He  was  engaged  in  general  contracting  in  Winnipeg  and  Brandon  and 
built  a  large  number  of  the  more  prominent  buildings  in  the  latter  city.  For 
eighteen  years  he  was  identified  with  that  province,  but  in  1897  continued  his 


F.   THOMAS   COPE 


BRITISH    COLUMBIA  217 

westward  journey  until  he  reached  Vancouver,  where  he  has  since  made  his 
home.  Here  he  established  his  present  business  as  a  dealer  in  electrical  sup- 
plies and  in  1905  his  sons,  Bert  F.  and  Frank  R.,  were  admitted  to  a  partnership, 
the  business  being  continued  under  the  firm  name  of  Cope  &  Son  until  1909, 
when  it  was  incorporated  as  Cope  &  Son,  Ltd.,  the  father  becoming  president 
of  the  company.  The  sons  are  both  still  interested  in  the  business,  to  which  they 
devote  their  time  and  energies,  and  the  enterprise,  determination,  close  applica- 
tion and  reliable  business  methods  of  the  partners  have  brought  them  a  large 
degree  of  success,  which  is  continuously  increasing.  The  father  has  also  been  a 
director  in  a  number  of  local  concerns,  but  at  the  present  time  is  concentrating  his 
energies  upon  the  electrical  supply  business. 

On  the  ist  of  December,  1884,  in  Gladstone,  Manitoba,  Mr.  Cope  was  united 
in  marriage  to  Miss  Margery  West,  a  daughter  of  W.  H.  and  Isabella  West,  the 
former  an  extensive  farmer  and  landowner  of  Gladstone.  The  children  of  this 
marriage  are  the  two  sons  previously  mentioned  as  associates  of  their  father  in 
business.  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Cope  hold  membership  in  the  English  church.  His 
political  allegiance  is  given  to  the  conservative  party  and  his  fraternal  relations 
are  with  the  Knights  of  Pythias  and  the  Independent  Order  of  Odd  Fellows. 
The  hope  that  led  him  to  seek  a  home  in  the  new  world  has  been  here  realized, 
for  in  the  freedom  and  appreciation  of  this  great  and  growing  western  country 
he  has  found  the  opportunities  he  sought  and  in  their  utilization  has  gained  a  sub- 
stantial position  among  the  representative,  practical  and  progressive  business  men 
of  his  adopted  city. 

CHARLES  J.  LOEWEN. 

Cnarles  J.  Loewen,  financial,  real-estate,  loan  and  insurance  agent,  and  now 
senior  partner  of  the  firm  of  Loewen,  Harvey  &  Preston,  Ltd.,  has  gained,  through 
the  exercise  of  opportunity  and  the  possession  of  supreme  and  well  developed 
ability,  an  enviable  place  in  financial  circles  in  Vancouver.  He  is  a  western  man, 
possessed  of  the  spirit  of  enterprise  and  progressiveness  which  is  characteristic 
of  the  Pacific  coast  country.  He  was  born  in  Victoria,  February  22,  1867,  and  is 
a  son  of  Joseph  and  Eva  (Laumeister)  Loewen.  The  father,  a  native  of  Ediger, 
Prussia,  born  in  1832,  sailed  for  the  United  States  in  1850,  and  settled  first  in 
New  York  city.  In  1856  he  removed  to  California,  where  for  two  years  he 
engaged  in  mining,  and  in  1858  came  to  British  Columbia,  arriving  in  Victoria 
on  the  4th  of  July  of  that  year.  He  followed  various  occupations  until  1870, 
when  in  association  with  Mr.  Erb  he  founded  the  Victoria  Brewery,  Loewen  & 
Erb,  proprietors.  He  was  active  in  the  management  of  the  business  under  that 
name  until  1892,  when  a  reorganization  was  effected  under  the  name  of  the  Vic- 
toria Phoenix  Brewery,  Ltd.,  of  which  Mr.  Loewen  remained  as  president  until 
his  death  in  1906.  Under  his  guidance  the  business  grew  and  developed  as  the 
standard  of  excellence  of  its  product  became  known  and  as  his  firm  established 
its  reputation  for  progressive  methods  and  reliable  dealing.  Mr.  Loewen  was, 
moreover,  widely  known  as  a  pioneer  settler  of  this  section  of  the  country,  wit- 
nessing its  entire  growth  and  development  and  taking  active  and  helpful  part  in 
the  work  of  general  progress  and  improvement. 

Charles  J.  Loewen  was  reared  in  Victoria  and  was  educated  in  the  public 
schools  there,  after  which  he  attended  Trinity  College  School  at  Port  Hope, 
Ontario.  He  next  entered  Trinity  University  at  Toronto  and  was  graduated  in 
1887  with  the  degree  of  B.  A.  He  then  pursued  a  post-graduate  course  and  won 
the  Master  of  Arts  degree  from  his  alma  mater  in  1889.  At  the  same  time  he  was 
pursuing  the  study  of  law  at  Osgoode  College,  from  which  he  was  graduated  in 
1890.  He  did  not  take  up  the  practice  of  law,  but  his  knowledge  thereof  has 
been  of  immense  value  to  him  in  the  conduct  of  his  present  business.  On 
returning  to  Victoria  he  entered  the  real-estate  and  financial  brokerage  field  in 


218  BRITISH    COLUMBIA 

1891  with  the  firm  of  H.  E.  Croasdaile  &  Company,  with  whom  he  remained 
until  1893,  when  he  came  to  Vancouver,  where  he  embarked  in  the  same  line  of 
business,  but  this  time  on  his  own  account.  He  has  since  become  well  known 
as  a  financial,  real-estate,  loan  and  insurance  agent  of  this  city,  being  now  senior 
partner  of  the  firm  of  Loewen,  Harvey  &  Preston,  Ltd.  The  business  was  organ- 
ized in  its  present  partnership  relation  in  1905,  no  change  occurring  save  that  a 
Mr.  Humble,  one  of  the  early  partners,  has  been  succeeded  by  Sir  Jacob  Preston, 
of  England.  Mr.  Loewen  is  the  president  of  this  company,  which  is  conducting 
business  as  financial  agents  and  real-estate,  insurance  and  stock  brokers,  their 
specialty  being  the  negotiation  of  first  mortgage  loans  on  city  property.  They 
also  undertake  investments  in  new  buildings,  the  erection  and  management  of 
business  and  office  buildings,  and  they  carry  on  a  general  rental  business  in 
that  class  of  property.  The  firm  has  membership  in  the  Vancouver  and  Victoria 
Stock  Exchanges  and  is  an  extensive  dealer  in  all  classes  of  listed  stocks  and 
shares,  government  and  municipal  bonds.  Aside  from  this  Mr.  Loewen  has 
various  financial  interests  and  is  a  director  and  officer  in  a  number  of  corporatipns. 
He  is  recognized  as  a  man  of  notably  sound  judgment  and  remarkably  keen 
insight  and  discrimination.  A  study  of  the  business  situation  has  given  him 
comprehensive  knowledge  of  investment  values,  enabling  him  to  carefully  pro- 
tect the  interests  of  his  clients  and  at  the  same  time  manage  business  affairs  to 
the  satisfaction  of  patrons  and  purchasers  alike. 

On  the  27th  of  June,  1898,  in  Vancouver,  Mr.  Loewen  was  united  in  marriage 
to  Miss  Edith  Warren,  a  daughter  of  Colonel  Falkland  George  Warren,  C.  B., 
C.  M.  G.,  R.  H.  A.  Their  children  are  Eva  Maud  and  Charles  Falkland. 

Mr.  Loewen  served  as  a  private  in  the  Queen's  Own  Rifles  at  Toronto  from 
1885  until  1887.  He  is  a  prominent  clubman,  identified  with  various  organiza- 
tions of  this  character  on  the  coast  including  the  Vancouver,  Royal  Vancouver 
Yacht,  Vancouver  Hunt  and  Jericho  Country  Clubs  of  Vancouver;  the  Union 
Club  of  Victoria,  and  the  Royal  Automobile  Club  of  London,  England.  He  is  also 
a  member  of  the  Society  of  Native  Sons  of  British  Columbia,  and  is  a  devotee  of 
rod  and  gun,  while  among  indoor  sports  he  is  an  expert  billiard  player.  His 
recreation  maintains  an  even  balance  with  strenuous  business  activity,  and  he 
has  learned  to  play  hard  as  well  as  work  hard,  entering  into  everything  with 
zest  and  a  contagious  enthusiasm. 


JOSEPH  DIXON. 

Joseph  Dixon,  a  well  known  manufacturer  of  Vancouver,  owning  as  a  mem- 
ber of  the  firm  of  Dixon  &  Murray  a  large  and  well  equipped  plant  for  the 
manufacture  of  a  general  line  of  office  and  store  fixtures,  has  developed  a  large 
and  gratifying  business  as  the  direct  result  of  methods  which  neither  seek  nor 
require  disguise.  In  fact,  there  is  no  esoteric  chapter  in  his  life  history  and 
careful  analysis  brings  to  light  the  fact  that  industry,  laudable  ambition  and 
energy  have  been  the  salient  forces  in  placing  him  among  those  who  are  fore- 
most in  business  circles  in  Vancouver  today.  Moreover,  as  a  citizen  he  is  ever 
progressive  and  he  has  been  a  witness  of  almost  the  entire  growth  and  progress 
of  Vancouver  since  it  rose  Phoenix-like  from  the  ashes  in  1886.  He  was  born  in 
Cumberland  county,  England,  October  2,  1860,  and  is  a  son  of  James  and  Martha 
(Watson)  Dixon.  The  father,  who  was  a  farmer  of  Cumberland  county,  died 
several  months  prior  to  the  birth  of  his  son,  Joseph. 

The  boy  was  educated  in  the  common  schools  of  Newbiggin,  England,  and 
as  a  youth  was  apprenticed  to  the  carpenter's  trade  at  Brampton,  near  Gaesland, 
England.  After  serving  his  apprenticeship  he  worked  at  carpentering  at  Dur- 
ham, England,  until  1880,  when  the  opportunities  of  the  new  world  proved  an 
irresistible  attraction  and  he  came  to  Canada,  settling  in  Winnipeg,  where  he  fol- 
lowed carpentering  until  1883.  In  that  year  he  came  to  British  Columbia,  locat- 


JOSEPH  DIXON 


BRITISH    COLUMBIA  221 

ing  at  Victoria,  where  he  worked  at  his  trade  until  1886 — the  year  of  his  arrival 
in  Granville,  now  Vancouver — where  he  has  since  remained.  He  reached  this 
city  just  prior  to  the  great  fire  of  June  I3th  which  completely  destroyed  this 
village  and  all  of  Mr.  Dixon's  effects.  With  the  rebuilding  of  the  city  he  had 
no  difficulty  in  finding  work  at  his  trade  and  was  thus  engaged  until  1890,  when 
he  began  operating  as  a  carpenter-contractor  on  a  small  scale,  the  fourteen-by- 
twenty-feet,  one-story  building  in  which  he  started  still  standing  in  the  rear  of 
No.  136  Water  street,  'forming  a  striking  contrast  to  their  present  handsome  and 
valuable  structure.  He  was  successful  from  the  first,  and  soon  built  up  a  fine 
business,  his  expert  workmanship,  his  fidelity  to  the  terms  of  a  contract  and  his 
honorable  dealing  on  all  occasions  being  the  elements  in  his  growing  success. 
He  operated  alone  until  1905,  when  he  entered  into  partnership  with  E.  O.  Lyte 
under  the  firm  name  of  Dixon  &  Lyte  and  at  the  same  time  began  the  manufac- 
ture of  store  and  office  fixtures,  establishing  a  mill  on  Fender  street  in  this 
city.  This  partnership  was  continued  until  1907,  in  which  year  their  plant  was 
destroyed  by  fire.  Soon  afterward  Mr.  Dixon  entered  into  partnership  with 
George  Murray  under  the  firm  name  of  Dixon  &  Murray,  which  association  is 
still  maintained.  They  erected  a  new  plant  at  Dunsmuir  street,  in  which  they 
manufacture  all  kinds  of  office  and  store  fixtures,  conducting  a  growing  and  sat- 
isfactory business.  Their  plant  is  modern  in  its  equipment,  displaying  the  latest 
improved  machinery  needed  in  their  line,  and  year  by  year  their  patronage  has 
increased,  for  they  ever  recognize  the  fact  that  satisfied  patrons  are  the  best 
advertisement  and  thus  they  have  endeavored  to  please  the  public  in  every  possi- 
ble way  commensurate  with  a  high  sense  of  business  honor  and  integrity.  In 
connection  with  their  manufacturing  interests  they  conduct  a  general  carpenter- 
ing, contracting  and  jobbing  business  which  has  also  extensive  proportions  and 
returns  to  them  a  gratifying  income.  In  addition  Mr.  Dixon  has  other  business 
and  financial  interests. 

On  the  1 5th  of  May,  1892,  was  celebrated  the  marriage  of  Joseph  Dixon  and 
Katherine  Cottier,  a  daughter  of  Robert  C.  Cottier,  of  Liverpool,  England.  She 
came  to  British  Columbia  with  her  family  after  the  death  of  her  father  and  her 
marriage  to  Mr.  Dixon  was  solemnized  in  Vancouver.  Living  in  this  city  for 
twenty-seven  years,  Mr.  Dixon  has  witnessed  almost  its  entire  growth  and  develop- 
ment. In  fact,  he  has  seen  Vancouver  rise  from  the  ashes  of  Granville,  has 
watched  its  transformation  and  has  borne  his  full  part  in  the  work  of  general 
progress  and  improvement,  being  at  all  times  a  public-spirited  and  progressive 
citizen  whose  labors  have  been  productive  of  much  good. 


WILLIAM  JOHN  HADDOCK. 

Commercial  activity  finds  a  worthy  representative  in  William  John  Haddock, 
of  the  wholesale  produce  firm  of  Parsons-Haddock  Company,  Ltd.  He  was 
born  in  Drayton,  Ontario,  February  12,  1878,  a  son  of  Thomas  and  Mary 
(Mannell)  Haddock.  The  father,  leaving  his  old  home  in  the  vicinity  of  Dublin, 
Ireland,  in  1840,  came  to  Canada  when  a  young  man,  settling  near  Holland, 
Ontario,  in  the  Queen's  Bush,  where  he  took  up  wild  land,  which  he  cleared  and 
developed,  converting  it  into  an  excellent  farm.  He  there  carried  on  general 
agricultural  pursuits  for  a  quarter  of  a  century,  when  he  retired  and  removed  to 
Drayton,  Ontario,  where  he  made  his  home  until  his  death,  which  occurred  in 
1902.  Mrs.  Haddock  survives  her  husband  and  is  now  a  resident  of  Vancouver. 

In  the  public  schools  of  Palmerston,  Ontario,  William  John  Haddock  pursued 
his  early  education  and  afterward  attended  high  school  at  Listowel,  Ontario.  In 
1-^)4  he  entered  the  employ  of  the  Grand  Trunk  Railway  Company  in  the  ticket 
office  at  Palmerston,  where  he  continued  until  1898,  when  he  went  to  the  Cariboo 
district  of  British  Columbia  and  entered  the  employ  of  Veith  &  Borland,  general 
icrchants,  at  150  Mile  House,  there  remaining  until  1903,  when  he  came  to  Van- 

Vol.  Ill—  8 


222  BRITISH    COLUMBIA 

couver  and  formed  a  partnership  with  John  R.  Parsons  in  the  wholesale  produce 
business,  organizing  the  firm  of  Parsons-Haddock  Company,  Ltd.,  under  which 
style  the  business  has  since  been  continued.  The  beginning  was  small,  but  the 
enterprise  has  been  developed  until  they  are  now  prominent  factors  in  their  line, 
conducting  a  large  busines  extending  over  the  entire  province.  Their  methods 
are  progressive  and  their  enterprise  unfaltering.  For  a  number  of  years  Mr. 
Haddock  traveled  on  the  road  in  the  interests  of  the  firm,  but  now  gives  his  undi- 
vided attention  to  the  general  management  of  the  business  in  Vancouver,  its 
growth  rendering  this  a  necessity. 

On  the  i4th  of  September,  1904,  Mr.  Haddock  was  united  in  marriage  to  Miss 
Gertrude  Hall,  a  daughter  of  S.  F.  Hall,  of  150  Mile  House,  formerly  postmaster 
there  and  now  living  in  Vancouver.  They  have  one  child,  Mary  Gertrude.  In 
politics  Mr.  Haddock  is  a  conservative,  but  the  honors  and  emoluments  of  office 
have  no  attraction  for  him.  He  belongs  to  the  Canadian  Order  of  Foresters  and 
to  the  United  Commercial  Travelers  of  America.  Something  more  of  the  nature 
of  the  diversity  of  his  interests  is  indicated  in  the  fact  that  he  holds  member- 
ship in  the  Terminal  City  Club  and  in  the  Church  of  England.  He  has  never  had 
occasion  to  regret  his  determination  to  seek  a  home  in  the  new  and  growing 
west,  with  its  broader  opportunities,  for  here  he  has  found  full  scope  for  his 
energy  and  perseverance — his  dominant  qualities — whereby  he  has  worked  his 
way  upward  from  a  comparatively  humble  position  to  a  recognized  place  of 
prominence  in  commercial  circles. 


WILLIAM  HENRY  ARMSTRONG. 

So  prominent  a  part  has  William  Henry  Armstrong  played  in  the  develop- 
ment of  the  northwest,  that  no  history  of  Vancouver  or  of  British  Columbia 
would  be  complete  were  there  failure  to  make  mention  of  his  life  record.  He  is 
today  one  of  the  prominent  and  highly  esteemed  residents  of  Vancouver,  carry- 
ing on  with  his  other  partners,  an  extensive  and  important  contracting  business 
under  the  firm  name  of  Armstrong,  Morrison  &  Company,  Limited.  He  was 
born  at  Stratford,  Ontario,  September  18,  1857,  and  is  a  son  of  James  and 
Martha  (Cargill)  Armstrong,  the  former  a  native  of  Darlington,  England, 
and  the  latter  of  the  north  of  Ireland.  They  were  married  in  Ontario,  where 
the  father  conducted  business  as  a  contractor  and  railroad  builder  to  the  time 
of  his  death,  which  occurred  when  he  was  sixty-five  years  of  age.  His  widow 
is  still  active,  retaining  all  her  faculties  at  the  age  of  eighty  years,  and  resides 
in  Vancouver,  where  she  has  made  her  home  for  the  past  twenty-two  years. 

In  the  little  school  at  Granton,  a  small  town  west  of  Stratford,  Mr.  Arm- 
strong received  his  early  education.  At  the  age  of  sixteen  years  he  became  a 
switchman  on  the  old  Grand  Trunk  Railway.  In  1875,  when  eighteen  years 
of  age,  he  engaged  with  the  bridge  construction  department  of  the  Ontario 
division  of  that  railway,  and  after  several  years  of  service,  he  decided  to  leave 
home  and  start  for  the  then  little  known  west.  In  March,  1877,  he  arrived 
in  Winnipeg,  and  shortly  afterwards  entered  the  employ  of  the  late  Joseph 
Whitehead,  who  was  just  entering  upon  the  construction  of  that  very  difficult 
portion  of  the  Canadian  Pacific  Railway,  known  as  section  15.  He  remained 
with  Mr.  Whitehead  as  master  mechanic  until  the  completion  of  the  work  in 
1883.  In  that  year  he  decided  to  go  still  further  west,  following  the  Canadian 
Pacific  Railway  construction,  and  he,  with  M.  J.  Haney,  who  was  manager  of 
construction  for  Mr.  Whitehead,  left  that  part  of  the  country  and  arrived  in 
Victoria  on  the  i5th  of  March.  From  there  he  went  to  Yale  and  entered  the 
service  of  Andrew  Onderdonk,  who  was  carrying  out  the  construction  of  the 
British  Columbia  section  of  the  Canadian  Pacific  Railway,  which  work  was 
completed  in  the  fall  of  1885.  Mr.  Armstrong  then  continued  with  Mr.  Onder- 
donk who  operated  the  road  for  nearly  a  year,  running  trains  from  Port -Moody 


WILLIAM  H.  ARMSTRONG 


BRITISH    COLUMBIA  225 

to  Kamloops.  In  1886  he  entered  the  service  of  the  Canadian  Pacific  Railway 
as  train  master  and  general  road  master,  which  position  he  held  for  about  two 
years.  A  publication  some  years  later,  wrote  of  him  in  connection  with  the 
Pioneer  Canadian  Pacific  Railway  train  arriving  in  Vancouver  on  June  6, 
1886,  as  follows :  "In  charge  of  that  epoch-making  train  that  arrived  even  ahead 
of  the  train  despatchers,  or  before  train  schedules  were  made  out,  was  'Big  Bill,' 
now  more  decorously  referred  to  as  Mr.  William  H.  Armstrong,  head  of  the 
well  known  local  contracting  firm  of  Armstrong,  Morrison  &  Company,  Limited. 
His  title  in  those  early  days  was  manager  of  construction.  He  has  charge  of 
track-laying  and  the  completion  of  that  portion  of  the  line  between  Port  Moody, 
which  had  been  used  as  a  temporary  terminus,  and  Vancouver  which  had  some 
time  previous  been  decided  on  as  the  actual  terminus." 

In  1887  Mr.  Armstrong  turned  his  attention  to  the  general  contracting  busi- 
ness, which  he  carried  on  independently.  Later  he  became  associated  with  Dan 
McGillivray  in  the  construction  of  the  New  Westminster  water  system.  In 
1892  he  formed  a  partnership  with  Alexander  Morrison,  which  exists  to  the 
present  day,  and  they  are  recognized  as  Vancouver's  pioneer  firm  of  contractors. 
They  purchased  the  McGillivray  plant  at  New  Westminster  and  removed  it  to 
Vancouver  upon  the  site  of  the  old  Vancouver  foundry,  conducting  a  large 
machine  shop  and  pipe  manufacturing  plant.  Important  contracts  were  quickly 
awarded  them,  their  first  being  for  the  construction  of  a  huge  water  main  on 
Main  street,  Vancouver,  to  the  reservoir  in  Stanley  Park,  and  they  later  com- 
pleted the  system  from  the  narrows  to  the  dam.  Gradually  they  extended  the 
scope  of  their  business  to  include  the  manufacture  of  mining  machinery,  and 
in  this  connection  made  and  installed  some  of  the  machinery  in  the  largest 
hydraulic  mining  plants  of  British  Columbia,  including  the  equipment  for  the 
Horse  Fly  gold  mines  on  the  Horse  Fly  river,  the  Bullion  mines  at  Quesnel 
and  many  others  of  lesser  importance.  In  1901  they  sold  this  plant  to  the 
Vancouver  Engineering  Works  Company  and  turned  their  attention  to  the 
street  paving  and  general  contracting  business  in  Vancouver,  in  which  they  again 
met  with  notable  and  well  merited  success.  They  have  paved  many  of  the 
principal  thoroughfares  of  the  city  with  creosoted  wood  blocks  and  bituminous 
rock.  In  1897  Mr.  Armstrong  undertook  and  successfully  completed  the  con- 
struction of  a  large  section  of  the  western  end  of  the  Crow's  Nest  branch  of 
the  Canadian  Pacific  Railway.  This  work  included  the  tunnel  at  the  head  of 
Moyie  lake  and  extended  to  and  included  the  long  trestle  and  transfer  slip  at 
Kootenay  Landing,  comprising  in  all  about  seventy  miles  of  railway,  which 
was  completed  in  the  record  time  of  twelve  months.  In  1902  they  took  up  the 
work  of  bridge  building  and  have  since  attained  great  distinction  in  that  con- 
nection, the  firm  name  being  coupled  with  the  successful  completion  of  impor- 
tant bridge  building  contracts  throughout  the  province.  They  built  the  bridge 
across  the  Fraser  river  at  New  Westminster  for  the  provincial  government 
in  which  there  were  accomplished  some  remarkable  feats  of  engineering.  Against 
two  diverse  currents  they  were  obliged  to  sink  some  of  the  deepest  piers  in 
the  world,  one  extending  one  hundred  and  forty  feet  below  the  surface  of  the 
water;  its  only  rival  being  a  pier  in  Australia,  which  is  one  hundred  and  forty- 
one  feet  below  the  surface.  They  have  since  built  the  Great  Northern  Railway 
bridge  across  False  creek,  the  Granville  and  Main  street  bridges  in  Vancouver, 
a  bridge  across  the  Columbia  river  at  Trail,  British  Columbia,  five  across  the 
Thompson  river  for  the  Canadian  Northern  Railway,  and  two  across  the  Fraser  for 
the  same  corporation.  These  seven  last  mentioned  bridges  were  begun  at  the 
same  time,  in  August,  1912,  and  were  all  completed  in  May,  1913,  the  rapidity 
with  which  the  work  was  accomplished  requiring  the  maintenance  of  a  large  plant 
in  the  vicinity  of  each  structure.  Much  more  might  be  written  concerning  the 
extent  and  importance  of  the  business  of  Messrs.  Armstrong,  Morrison  &  Com- 
pany, Liniited,  but  their  reputation  is  too  well  known  to  need  extensive  mention 
here.  They  rank  with  the  ablest  contractors  of  the  northwest  and  their  success 
has  been  builded  upon  the  personal  ability  and  business  integrity  and  enterprise 


226  BRITISH    COLUMBIA 

of  the  principals.  In  1897  W.  C.  Ditmars  entered  their  employ  and  in  1903 
was  admitted  to  a  partnership.  In  the  same  year  Robert  Armstrong  also  joined 
the  firm.  No  company  in  the  history  of  the  province  has  had  a  more  active  part 
in  the  actual  upbuilding  of  this  great  country.  The  builders  of  the  railroads, 
the  bridges  and  the  machinery  for  the  development  of  the  mines  must  in  any 
country  be  classed  among  its  chief  promoters,  their  labors  proving  a  most  vital 
and  valuable  element  in  the  work  of  general  progress  and  improvement. 

Aside  from  his  connection  with  the  contracting  business,  Mr.  Armstrong 
has  various  other  interests,  being  a  British  Columbia  director  of  the  Graham 
Island  Coal  &  Timber  Syndicate,  Ltd.,  and  president  of  the  Clayburn  Company, 
Ltd.  The  latter  was  organized  in  1905  as  the  Vancouver  Fire  Clay  Company, 
Ltd.,  and  was  incorporated  in  1909  under  its  present  title.  They  have  the  largest 
plant  of  its  kind  in  British  Columbia,  around  which  they  have  built  the  town  of' 
Clayburn,  having  all  modern  facilities.  There  is  a  private  railroad  line  ex- 
tending through  the  town  to  the  plant  and  they  manufacture  all  kinds  of  build- 
ing and  fire  brick.  Mr.  Armstrong  is  also  president  of  the  Keremeos  Land  Com- 
pany, which  was  organized  in  1907  and  which  owns  more  than  two  thousand 
acres  of  valuable  fruit  land  in  the  Keremeos  district  of  the  Similkumeen.  Dur- 
ing the  last  few  years  in  which  the  company  has  been  operating  they  have  brought 
this  land  to  a  high  state  of  cultivation.  Mr.  Armstrong  is  now  building  a  beau- 
tiful home  in  the  heart  of  that  attractive  district,  in  which  he  owns  a  very  ex- 
tensive fruit  ranch.  On  this  place  he  grows  apples,  peaches,  pears  and  many 
other  varieties  of  fruit  that  are  unsurpassed  on  this  continent.  He  is  likewise 
managing  director  of  the  Nicola  Valley  Coal  &  Coke  Company,  Ltd.,  one  of  the 
large  coal  mining  companies  of  British  Columbia.  He  is  likewise  vice  president 
and  director  of  the  Pacific  Marine  Insurance  Company  of  Vancouver,  which 
is  composed  of  a  number  of  Vancouver's  most  representative  citizens,  Mr.  Arm- 
strong being  one  of  the  original  shareholders.  His  connection  with  any  business 
enterprise  is  to  his  fellow  citizens  a  guaranty  of  its  solidity  and  reliability,  and 
moreover,  his  connection  with  its  management  seems  to  be  a  sure  guaranty  of 
its  success. 

In  Victoria,  British  Columbia,  on  the  ist  of  June,  1885,  Mr.  Armstrong  was 
united  in  marriage  to  Miss  Ellen  Mildred  Ward,  of  England.  They  are  mem- 
bers of  St.  Paul's  Anglican  church,  and  Mr.  Armstrong  is  also  a  life  member 
of  Ancient  Landmark  Lodge,  No.  3,  A.  F.  &  A.  M.  of  Winnipeg,  and  a  mem- 
ber of  the  Vancouver  Club  since  its  incorporation.  He  is  a  life  governor 
of  the  Vancouver  General  Hospital  and  is  interested  in  many  projects  to  pro- 
mote the  welfare  of  the  individual  of  the  community  at  large.  In  politics  he  is 
a  conservative,  but  not  an  active  party  worker.  He  owned  the  first  automobile 
in  British  Columbia,  a  Stanley  Steamer,  which  he  purchased  in  Boston  and 
brought  to  this  province  in  1899.  There  is  today  a  no  more  enthusiastic  motor- 
ist in  British  Columbia  than  Mr.  Armstrong.  It  is  characteristic  of  him  that  he 
enters  into  everything  with  which  he  becomes  connected,  whether  it  be  pleasure, 
benevolent  projects,  church  work  or  business,  with  an  enthusiasm-  that  is  con- 
tagious. His  course  and  courage  inspire  confidence,  for  it  is  well  known  that 
he  is  ever  on  the  side  of  progress  and  that  his  business  activity  is  guided  by 
sound  principles. 


FRANK   NOBLE   TRITES. 

The  name  of  Trites,  Ltd.,  is  a  synonym  for  progressive  real-estate  activity. 
It  indicates  large  business  controlled  by  him  whose  name  introduces  this  review, 
for  to  his  credit  stand  various  record  sales  of  the  city.  There  was  a  time  when 
a  prospective  purchaser  would  hunt  out  the  owner  of  property  and  between  them 
would  be  concluded  the  transaction.  Today  practically  all  real-estate  .transfers 
go  through  the  hands  of  enterprising  men  who  have  made  a  close  study  of  the 


BRITISH    COLUMBIA  227 

business  which  at  the  present  time  is  as  carefully  systematized  and  as  wisely 
directed  as  that  of  any  commercial,  manufacturing  or  industrial  concern.  The 
consensus  of  public  opinion  names  Frank  Noble  Trites  as  one  of  the  foremost 
factors  in  real-estate  circles  not  only  in  Vancouver  but  in  all  British  Columbia. 
He  was  born  in  the  province  of  New  Brunswick,  April  8,  1872,  and  is  a  son  of 
Isaiah  and  Mary  E.  (Steeves)  Trites,  both  of  whose  ancestors  were  members  of  a 
colony  who  settled  in  the  vicinity  of  what  is  now  Moncton,  New  Brunswick,  about 
1700,  coming  to  the  new  world  from  Germany.  They  were  among  the  first  settlers 
in  that  section  of  tfle  American  continent.  Three  or  four  families  made  the 
voyage,  the  Trites  being  represented  by  a  father  and  seven  sons.  They  landed 
in  the  fall  of  the  year,  expecting  their  provision  ship  to  follow,  but  it  never 
arrived,  and  the  colonists  had  a  hard  winter,  living  as  best  they  could  on  such 
food  as  they  could  obtain  from  the  Indians  until  they  could  plant  and  raise  a 
crop  the  following  year.  The  Trites  family  is  today  a  very  large  and  influential 
one  in  Canada,  the  descendants  of  the  original  settlers  being  widely  scattered  over 
the  Dominion. 

The  ancestral  home  was  maintained  in  the  vicinity  of  Moncton  for  many 
years,  and  in  the  public  schools  of  that  place  Frank  Noble  Trites  pursued  his 
education.  His  people  were  connected  with  agricultural  interests  and  he  remained 
upon  the  home  farm  until  seventeen  years  of  age.  When  it  came  time  for  him  to 
enter  business  circles  he  considered  the  question  of  a  favorable  location  and 
determined  to  try  his  fortune  in  the  west.  Accordingly  in  1889  he  left  home — 
then  a  young  man  of  seventeen  years — and  went  to  Seattle,  Washington,  where 
he  engaged  on  a  milk  ranch  for  a  short  time  until  he  became  familiar  with  the 
country.  He  then,  in  1890,  crossed  the  border  and  became  a  resident  of  British 
Columbia,  settling  at  Steveston,  where  he  built  and  conducted  a  boarding  house, 
continuing  in  that  business  for  a  year.  He  next  became  associated  with  George 
Blake  in  the  publication  of  the  Steveston  Enterprise,  a  weekly  paper,  which  was 
later  removed  to  Wellington.  Mr.  Trites  then  embarked  in  merchandising,  con- 
ducting a  general  store  at  Steveston,  and  later  he  joined  the  gold  rush  to  the  Atlin 
district,  where  he  prospected  for  several  months.  On  his  return  to  Steveston  he 
engaged  in  the  hotel  business  and  at  the  same  time  began  acquiring  farm  lands 
which  he  developed  and  cultivated.  He  gradually  increased  his  investments  in 
farm  lands  in  that  neighborhood  and  still  has  large  and  valuable  holdings  in 
that  vicinity. 

Mr.  Trites'  active  connection  with  Vancouver  dates  from  1905,  in  which  year 
he  established  a  real-estate  office,  operating  alone  until  1909,  when  he  formed  the 
firm  of  Trites  &  Leslie.  After  a  few  months,  however,  he  purchased  his  part- 
ner's interest  and  organized  the  firm  of  F.  N.  Trites  &  Company,  Ltd.,  which 
company  was  afterward  recapitalized  and  became  the  present  firm  of  Trites,  Ltd. 
As  president  Mr.  Trites  is  now  the  executive  head  of  the  business.  The  company 
is  conducting  a  general  real-estate  and  financial  brokerage  business,  handling 
subdivisions  and  acreage  property,  and  they  are  very  large  operators  in  the  real- 
estate  field,  having  controlled  many  important  deals.  Mr.  Trites  is  thoroughly 
conversant  with  realty  values  not  only  in  this  city  but  in  other  sections  of  the 
province,  is  an  expert  valuator,  and  his  progressive  methods  have  carried  him  far 
beyond  the  ranks  of  the  majority.  Many  of  his  extensive  real-estate  operations 
have  attracted  attention  throughout  Canada,  the  United  States  and  even  abroad. 
One  such  was  the  sale,  in  1909,  of  the  Point  Grey  lands,  owned  by  the  government, 
a  record  sale,  in  which  the  firm  disposed  of  six  hundred  and  sixty  acres  for  the 
sum  of  two  million,  six  hundred  and  fourteen  thousand  dollars.  At  the  time  the 
tract  was  absolutely  wild  land  and  the  prices  obtained  were  unheard  of  for  such 
land.  Mr.  Trites  has  always  advertised  extensively  in  Canada,  the  United  States 
and  abroad,  and  during  the  sale  of  the  Point  Grey  lands  he  himself  bought  prop- 
erty to  the  value  of  two  hundred  and  fifty  thousand  dollars.  This  land  is  now 
subdivided  and  constitutes  one  of  Vancouver's  most  beautiful  suburbs,  the  lots 
bringing  a  high  figure.  All  this  indicates  the  keen  discernment  and  foresight  of 
Mr.  Trites  whose  judgment  in  matters  of  business,  especially  real  estate,  is  seldom 


228  BRITISH    COLUMBIA 

ever  at  fault.  He  made  a  personal  investigation  of  prices  all  over  the  United 
States  and  Canada  and  so  promoted  his  knowledge  that  he  became  recognized  as 
an  expert  valuator,  being  thus  able  to  satisfy  himself  that  when  he  was  discussing 
property  he  was  giving  correct  information  which  the  most  thorough  investigation 
would  bear  out.  Beside  his  important  and  growing  real-estate  business  he  also 
has  other  financial  interests,  being  secretary  and  director  of  the  Alexander  Land 
Company  and  the  Arcadia  Land  Company  and  president  of  the  recently  organized 
Gilford  Fish  Company,  Ltd.,  which  is  building  a  large  cannery  at  Kingcome  inlet. 
Aside  from  any  company  connection  Mr.  Trites  is  an  extensive  owner  of  both 
city  and  suburban  realty  and  farm  lands  and  his  holdings  bring  him  a  most 
gratifying  annual  return. 

In  1900  Mr.  Trites  was  married  to  Miss  Mamie  Pitts  and  following  her  demise 
he  was  married  in  1906  to  Miss  Frances  L.  Ferris,  who  was  born  near  Amherst- 
burg,  Ontario.  They  had  two  children,  but  one  is  now  deceased.  The  daughter, 
Helen,  is  with  her  parents.  Mr.  Trites  is  a  conservative  in  politics.  He  was  a 
councilman  of  Richmond  from  1906  to  1911,  and  was  the  first  to  propose  the 
establishment  of  a  water  supply  for  the  island  from  the  New  Westminster  plant 
for  the  township  of  Richmond.  His  labors  were  instrumental  in  securing  the 
adoption  of  this  plan,  and  today  the  farmers  and  in  fact  all  residents  of  the  island 
are  supplied  with  pure  water.  His  service  in  this  and  other  connections  has  been 
actuated  by  a  public-spirited  devotion  to  the  general  good.  He  belongs  to  the 
Vancouver  Commercial  Club,  and  there  is  no  man  in  the  city  who  is  more  loyal 
to  the  public  welfare  or  has  firmer  faith  in  what  the  future  has  in  store  for 
Vancouver.  He  never  heedlessly  passed  by  an  opportunity  to  advance  municipal 
interests  and  his  cooperation  is  heartily  and  zealously  given  to  many  measures 
which  have  had  direct  bearing  upon  its  welfare  and  upbuilding.  He  crossed  the 
continent  when  a  youth  of  seventeen  years,  dependent  upon  his  own  resources 
for  whatever  the  world  was  to  bring  him  of  enjoyment  or  success.  He  has 
reached  a  high  position  and  is  now  the  possessor  of  almost  all  things  that  men 
covet  as  of  value,  and  best  of  all,  he  has  won  it  by  his  unaided  exertions  and  his 
enterprise.  His  career  is  perhaps  too  near  for  its  significance  to  be  appraised  at  its 
true  value,  but  the  future  will  be  able  to  trace  the  tremendous  effect  of  his  labors 
upon  the  best  interests  and  upbuilding  of  the  city  which  he  makes  his  home. 


CECIL  GOWER  McLEAN. 

Cecil  Gower  McLean  is  president  of  the  Traders  Trust  Company,  Limited,  of 
Vancouver  and  secretary  and  treasurer  of  the  Western  Union  Fire  Insurance 
Company,  and  by  virtue  of  these  connections  and  the  commanding  ability  and 
force  of  personality  which  have  made  them  possible  one  of  the  representative 
young  business  men  of  the  city.  He  was  born  in  Charlottetown,  Prince  Edward 
Island,  in  1885  and  is  a  son  of  A.  A.  McLean,  who  has  represented  that  city  in 
the  Dominion  parliament  for  seven  years. 

Cecil  Gower  McLean  acquired  his  later  education  in  Prince  of  Wales  College 
at  Charlottetown,  from  which  he  was  graduated  in  1903.  Immediately  afterward 
he  moved  to  Edmonton,  Alberta,  where  he  entered  the  local  branch  of  the  Bank 
of  Nova  Scotia  as  a  clerk.  After  four  years  in  this  capacity  he  established  him- 
self in  the  real-estate  and  brokerage  business  in  Calgary,  remaining  in  this  con- 
nection for  a  year  and  a  half,  after  which  he  came  to  Vancouver  and  here  organ- 
ized the  Western  Union  Fire  Insurance  Company,  the  stockholders  of  which 
comprise  five  hundred  of  Western  Canada's  most  prominent  business  and  profes- 
sional men.  This  is  purely  a  western  company  and  has  become  an  important 
business  factor  in  this  part  of  the  Dominion,  for  its  growth  has  been  rapid  and 
its  influence  has  increased  yearly,  much  of  the  credit  for  this  gratifying  result 
being  due  to  the  energy,  business  acumen  and  enterprise  of  its  founder,  who 
since  1910  has  acted  as  secretary  and  treasurer.  The  concern  is  now  about  to 


CECIL  G.  McLEAX 


BRITISH    COLUMBIA  231 

amalgamate  with  the  Ontario  Fire  Insurance  Company.  Mr.  McLean  has  given 
a  great  deal  of  time  and  attention  to  the  affairs  of  the  Western  Union  Fire 
Insurance  Company  but  has  been  active  in  other  fields  also,  being  a  man  of  wide 
interests  and  resourceful  ability.  In  June,  1912  he  organized  the  Traders  Trust 
Company,  Limited,  capitalized  at  two  hundred  and  fifty  thousand  dollars  and 
conducted  entirely  by  Vancouver  business  men.  Mr.  McLean  is  president  of  this 
concern  and  in  this  position,  calling  for  administrative  ability  and  organizing 
power  of  a  high  order,  has  accomplished  a  great  deal  of  constructive  and  far- 
sighted  work. 

In  Calgary,  Alberta,  in  the  spring  of  1907,  Mr.  McLean  was  united  in  marriage 
to  Miss  Ida  Locke,  of  Summerside,  Prince  Edward  Island,  and  they  have  become 
the  parents  of  two  children,  Ola  Millicent  and  Rex.  Mr.  McLean  is  a  conserva- 
tive in  his  political  beliefs  and  a  member  of  the  Presbyterian  church.  He  belongs 
to  the  Vancouver  Commercial  Club  and  is  interested  in  the  growth  of  the  city, 
cooperating  heartily  in  movements  to  promote  its  permanent  interest.  Although 
still  a  young  man  he  has  made  important  contributions  to  business  development, 
two  of  the  largest  concerns  in  Vancouver  owing  their  organization  to  his  initiative 
spirit  and  their  continued  progress  to  his  energy  and  enterprise.  The  future 
undoubtedly  holds  for  him  continued  advancement  along  business  lines  and 
notable  accomplishments  in  this  field,  for  he  possesses  in  his  energy,  integrity  and 
progressive  spirit  the  qualities  which  command  success. 


HUGH   B.   GILMOUR. 

No  history  of  the  business  or  political  development  of  British  Columbia  would 
be  complete  without  mention  of  Hugh  B.  Gilmour,  now  manager  of  the  Waterous 
Engine  Company  in  Vancouver  and  one  of  the  most  active,  able  and  progressive 
men  in  the  city.  Throughout  a  period  of  residence  here  dating  from  1888  he  has 
exerted  a  wide  influence  upon  the  development  of  some  of  its  most  important 
institutions  and,  being  at  all  times  high  in  his  ideals  and  worthy  in  his  standards, 
the  influence  has  been  a  force  for  good  in  community  advancement.  He  was 
born  in  Toronto,  Ontario,  in  1862,  and  is  a  son  of  Robert  and  Elizabeth  (Bowie) 
Gilmour,  natives  of  Barrhead,  Renfrewshire,  Scotland,  whence  they  moved  to 
Ontario  about  1854.  The  father  was  master  mechanic  for  the  Grand  Trunk 
Railroad  for  several  years  and  had  his  headquarters  in  Montreal  and  in  various 
parts  of  Ontario  until  1883,  when  he  went  to  Winnipeg  as  master  mechanic  for  the 
Canadian  Pacific  line.  He  became  well  known  in  the  line  of  work  which  claimed 
his  attention  during  all  of  his  active  career  and  his  prominence  carried  him  for- 
ward into  important  relations  with  it,  securing  him  a  position  as  master  mechanic 
for  the  Great  Northern  Railroad,  his  duties  in  that  capacity  bringing  him  to  the 
United  States.  He  died  in  Winnipeg  in  1890,  at  the  age  of  sixty-two,  and  was 
survived  by  his  wife  until  1911,  her  death  occurring  when  she  was  eighty-one 
years  of  age. 

Hugh  B.  Gilmour  acquired  his  education  in  the  public  schools  of  his  native 
province  and  afterward  attended  the  Ottawa  Collegiate  Institute.  After  he  had 
laid  aside  his  books  he  began  his  independent  career  in  Ottawa,  securing  a  position 
as  an  apprenticed  mechanical  engineer  for  the  Vulcan  Iron  Works  of  that  city. 
After  serving  his  apprenticeship  he  became  connected  with  the  John  Abel  Engine 
Works  at  Woodbridge,  Ontario,  and  there  remained  until  1883,  when  be  came 
west  as  master  mechanic  for  the  Canadian  Pacific  Railroad  at  Calgary,  Alberta. 
He  was  identified  with  a  great  deal  of  important  construction  work  through  the 
mountains  and  in  all  parts  of  British  Columbia  and  in  1898  resigned  from  the 
service,  having  in  the  fifteen  years  of  his  connection  with  it  aided  in  the  great 
work  of  progress  and  development  which  has  made  British  Columbia  one  of  the 
greatest  of  the  Canadian  provinces. 


232  BRITISH    COLUMBIA 

When  he  resigned  from  the  Canadian  Pacific  Railroad  Mr.  Gilmour  accepted 
the  position  of  manager  of  the  Waterous  Engine  Company,  the  main  office  and 
factory  being  located  at  Brantford,  Ontario.  He  has  control  of  the  western 
branch  covering  Vancouver  and  the  Yukon  territory  and  he  has  given  a  great 
deal  of  his  time,  energy  and  attention  to  the  development  of  the  concern,  the 
successful  and  rapid  expansion  of  which  is  largely  due  to  him. 

It  is  not  alone  along  business  lines,  however,  that  Mr.  Gilmour  has  done  splen- 
did work  for  British  Columbia.  Unlike  many  men  of  wealth  he  has  not  left 
political  service  for  others  but  has  felt  it  a  duty  and  an  obligation  to  serve  his 
fellowmen  when  they  have  indicated  their  desire  for  him  to  do  so.  In  1899  he  was 
elected  to  the  Vancouver  city  council,  and  during  the  time  of  his  able  and  bene- 
ficial service  served  as  chairman  of  the  police  and  fire  committee.  From  1901 
to  1903  he  represented  the  district  of  Vancouver  in  the  provincial  parliament, 
his  influence  during  that  time  being  always  on  the  side  of  right,  reform  and 
progress  and  his  vote  cast  only  for  measures  which  he  believed  would  promote 
the  best  interests  of  the  province. 

At  Woodbridge,  Ontario,  in  1882,  Mr.  Gilmour  was  united  in  marriage  to  Miss 
Alf  reda  Nester,  of  Neustadt,  Ontario,  and  they  have  three  sons :  Robert  Noble, 
who  is  associated  in  business  with  his  father;  Frank  Nester;  and  Stewart  Hugh. 
Mr.  Gilmour  was  president  of  the  Imperial  Trust  Company  during  the  existence 
of  that  concern  and  has  had  other  important  outside  business  connections.  He 
gives  his  political  allegiance  to  the  liberal  party  and  has  important  fraternal  con- 
nection, being  a  member  of  Western  Star  Lodge,  No.  10,  I.  O.  O.  F.,  and  of  Cas- 
cade Lodge,  No.  12,  A.  F.  &  A.  M.  He  has  attained  a  position  of  distinction  in 
the  Independent  Order  of  Odd  Fellows,  being  past  grand  master  of  the  grand 
lodge  of  British  Columbia.  He  is  a  member  of  the  Terminal  City  Club,  and  he 
and  his  wife  are  well  known  in  social  circles.  Mr.  Gilmour  is  a  man  of  marked 
individuality,  strong  character  and  stalwart  purpose,  who  in  citizenship,  in  business 
relations  and  in  private  life  commands  the  respect  of  all  with  whom  he  has  been 
brought  in  contact. 


RT.  REV.  ADAM  URIAS  DE  PENCIER., 

A  spiritual  leader  and  a  man  practical  in  the  affairs  of  the  world,  one  whose 
purity  of  purpose  is  acknowledged  by  all,  Rt.  Rev.  Adam  Urias  de  Pencier,  bishop 
of  New  Westminster,  exerts  a  vast  influence  over  the  people  of  his  diocese — an 
influence  even  greater  than  that — over  all  the  people  of  his  province.  An  inces- 
sant worker  in  the  ranks  of  the  Anglican  church,  actively  interested  in  civic 
affairs,  his  church  is  under  his  able  guidance  making  great  advances.  He  is  one 
of  those  genial  men  readily  understanding  the  springs  of  human  conduct,  one 
who  reads  deep  in  the  lives  of  his  fellow  beings,  understands  them  and  gives 
readily  his  best  efforts  to  help  and  guide  them.  Under  his  stimulating  influence 
his  diocese  is  growing  fast  and  he  manages  its  affairs  with  a  strong  hand  and 
that  kindly  persuasion  which  ever  exerts  an  influence  upon  human  beings  and 
brings  them  around  the  standard  of  a  leader. 

Born  at  Burritts  Rapids,  Ontario,  on  February  9,  1866,  Adam  U.  de 
Pencier  is  a  son  of  P.  Theodore  and  Sarah  de  Pencier.  The  father  was  a  mill 
owner  and  farmer  and  a  grandson  of  another  Theodore  von  Pencier,  an  officer 
in  Baron  of  Riedesel's  Dragoons,  part  of  the  Hessian  contingent  serving 
under  the  British  crown  in  the  American  war  of  independence  under  Burgoyne. 
The  father  was  born  on  the  banks  of  the  Rideau  river,  on  land  given  by  the 
government  for  services  rendered.  Bishop  de  Pencier's  mother's  people  were 
Eastmans  of  Pennsylvania  but  originally  from  Kent,  England,  and  of  United 
Empire  Loyalist  stock.  Both  parents  are  deceased. 

Bishop  de  Pencier  was  educated  in  the  public  and  high  schools  of  Kempt- 
ville,  Ontario,  and  also  had  as  a  private  tutor  the  late  Rev.  Canon  Lowe  of 


ET.  REV.  ADAM  U.  DE  PENCIER 


BRITISH    COLUMBIA  235 

Ottawa,  Ontario.  At  the  entrance  examinations  to  the  Kemptville  high  school  in 
1880  he  won  the  gold  medal,  early  distinguishing  himself  by  his  wide  knowledge 
and  his  purposeful  work.  In  the  expectation  of  devoting  himself  to  teaching 
he  trained  at  the  Ottawa  Normal  School  under  Dr.  MacCabe  and  was  at  one 
time  assistant  to  the  first  principal  in  the  first  county  model  school  at  Richmond, 
Ontario.  He  matriculated  at  Trinity  University,  Toronto,  in  1885  but  did  not 
go  into  residence  until  1893,  in  which  year  he  took  up  the  arts  course.  He 
graduated  as  Bachelor  of  Arts  in  1895.  Under  the  tuition  of  the  late  Canon 
R.  L.  M.  Houston  and  the  late  Archdeacon  Bedford  Jones,  of  Ontario,  he  was 
prepared  for  Holy  Orders  and  ordained  deacon  by  the  late  Archbishop  Lewis  in 
1890  and  priested  in  the  same  year  by  that  dignitary.  After  ordination  he  was 
appointed  incumbent  at  Navan  in  the  diocese  of  Ontario,  remaining  there  from 
1890  to  1893.  I"  l&94  he  went  to  St.  Albans  cathedral  at  Toronto  as  vicar  and 
in  1897  became  incumbent  at  Uxbridge,  Ontario,  so  remaining  from  1898  to  1900. 
He  was  senior  curate  to  Canon  Welsh  at  St.  James  cathedral  in  Toronto  and 
afterward  went  to  St.  Matthew's  at  Brandon,  Manitoba,  as  rector,  succeeding 
the  present  bishop  of  Qu'  Appelle  (Dr.  Harding)  in  1900.  While  in  charge  two 
churches  were  built,  St.  George's  and  St.  Mary's,  and  upon  his  resigning  the 
rectorship  two  seperate  parishes  were  established.  On  leaving  Brandon,  Bishop 
de  Pencier  was  offered  the  rectorship  of  St.  Paul's  at  Vancouver  by  the  late 
Bishop  Dart  through  the  good  services  of  the  late  Archdeacon  Pentreath.  On 
the  death  of  Bishop  Dart,  Bishop  de  Pencier  was  elected  bishop  of  New  West- 
minster at  the  synod  held  in  Holy  Trinity  church  in  June,  1910.  In  1911  the 
University  of  Trinity  College  conferred  on  him  the  degree  of  D.  D.  (honoris 
causa). 

In  1895  Bishop  de  Pencier  married  Nina  Frederick  Wells,  the  only  daughter 
of  Lieutenant  Fred  Wells,  of  the  First  Royals.  The  father  rendered  distin- 
guished service  through  the  Crimean  war.  Bishop  and  Mrs.  de  Pencier  are  the 
parents  of  four  sons  and  two  daughters:  Theodore  Frederick  Wells,  attending 
McGill  University;  John  Dartnell  and  Joseph  Christian,  at  University  School, 
Victoria ;  Nina  Hortense  and  Sarah  Elizabeth,  at  home ;  and  Eric  Andrew  Edwin. 

Bishop  de  Pencier  is  typical  of  the  churchman  of  the  times,  ohe  who  readily 
participates  in  all  the  joys  and  sorrows  of  his  fellow  beings.  It  is  this  strong 
humane  spirit  which  makes  him  the  powerful  influence  in  the  moral  advance- 
ment of  his  province  and  the  strong  factor  in  the  growth  of  his  church.  From 
him  radiates  that  smiling  kindness  which  brings  cheer  to  every  heart.  The  Bishop 
is  a  commanding  figure,  standing  over  six  feet  high,  and  is  familiar  to  every  inhab- 
itant of  New  Westminster.  During  the  coronation  of  their  majesties,  the  king  and 
queen,  Bishop  de  Pencier  received  a  royal  command  to  attend  and  in  company  with 
other  over-seas  bishops  had  the  distinction  of  participating  in  the  historic  event  at 
Westminster  Abbey.  He  is  as  loyal  to  his  country  and  his  king  as  he  is  to  the 
charge  which  has  been  given  into  his  hands  and  all  of  his  actions  are  permeated 
with  that  loyalty  and  guided  by  his  strong  character. 


HENRY   WILFRED   MAYNARD. 

Henry  Wilfred  Maynard,  district  manager  for  the  Canadian  Explosives,  Ltd., 
\v;is  born  at  Rhyl,  Wales,  July  31,  1867,  his  parents  being  Colonel  Edmond 
Gilling  and  Gertrude  (Trevor-Roper)  Maynard.  The  father  was  colonel  of  the 
Eighty-eighth  Connaught  Rangers,  an  Irish  regiment,  which  he  commanded 
through  the  Crimean  war  and  also  in  the  Indian  mutiny. 

The  family  came  to  America  during  the  childhood  days  of  Henry  W.  Maynard 
and  established  their  home  at  San  Jose,  California,  where  he  attended  the  public 
schools.  He  started  in  the  business  world  in  connection  with  the  lumber  trade 
Of  I'uget  Sound,  being  employed  for  a  number  of  years  in  various  capacities  as  a 
representative  of  lumber  interests.  In  1891  he  came  to  Vancouver  to  take  charge 


236  BRITISH    COLUMBIA 

of  the  business  of  the  Hamilton  Powder  Company,  which  in  1911  was  merged  into 
the  Canadian  Explosives,  Ltd.,  Mr.  Maynard  being  retained  as  manager.  The 
steps  in  his  orderly  progression  are  easily  discernible.  He  has  advanced  steadily 
from  one  point  to  another  and  each  point  has  had  a  broader  outlook  and  wider 
opportunities.  His  worth  and  industry  have  constituted  the  rounds  of  the  ladder 
on  which  he  has  climbed  to  his  present  enviable  and  responsible  position.  In  addi- 
tion to  his  connection  with  the  Canadian  Explosives,  Ltd.,  he  owns  considerable 
real  estate  in  Vancouver  and  is  also  a  stockholder  and  one  of  the  directors  of  the 
Vancouver  &  Nanaimo  Coal  Company,  Ltd.,  of  Vancouver. 

On  the  1 5th  of  May,  1894,  in  the  city  in  which  he  makes  his  home,  Mr.  May- 
nard was  married  to  Miss  Emily  Stewart,  a  daughter  of  Donald  and  Margaret 
Stewart,  the  former  now  deceased.  As  is  indicated  by  the  surname,  she  comes 
of  an  old  Scotch  family.  By  this  marriage  have  been  born  three  daughters,  Ger- 
trude Eva,  Margaret  Emily  and  Catherine  Easterby. 

In  politics  Mr.  Maynard  is  a  conservative,  and  his  religious  faith  is  that 
of  the  Presbyterian  church.  He  is  a  member  of  the  Terminal  City  Club  and  is 
thus  connected  with  various  interests  and  activities  which  feature  in  the  life  of 
Vancouver  and  are  forces  in  its  development  and  expansion.  Mr.  Maynard  has 
never  sought  to  figure  prominently  in  any  public  relation,  but  his  life  history 
is  not  without  its  lessons  to  all  who  recognize  the  true  worth  and  value  of 
character. 


JOHN  JAMES  MAcKAY. 

New  Westminster  has  been  signally  favored  in  the  class  of  men  who  have 
occupied  her  public  offices,  in  which  connection  John  James  MacKay  is  well 
known,  being  the  city  treasurer.  He  was  born  at  East  River,  Pictou  county,  Nova 
Scotia,  July  4,  1852,  his  parents  being  Donald  and  Annie  (McFarland')  MacKay, 
who  were  also  natives  of  Pictou  county.  Donald  MacKay's  grandfather,  who 
was  wounded  at  the  capture  of  the  city  of  Quebec,  retired  from  the  army  and  set- 
tled near  New  Glasgow,  Nova  Scotia,  where  he  owned  valuable  coal  lands.  His 
son,  Alexander  MacKay,  married  a  Miss  Eraser  and  took  up  his  abode  on  the 
East  river,  where  his  son,  Donald,  father  of  John  J.  MacKay,  was  born.  Donald 
MacKay  engaged  in  farming  and  stock-raising  for  a  time  and  afterward  removed 
to  vSherbrooke,  Guysborough  county,  where  he  was  connected  with  a  lumber  mill, 
while  afterward  he  engaged  in  quartz  milling  and  gold  amalgamating. 

In  the  public  schools  of  Sherbrooke,  J.  J.  MacKay  pursued  his  early  education 
and  later  attended  Eaton  &  Frazee's  Business  College  in  the  city  of  Halifax,  Nova 
Scotia,  in  1870  and  1871.  His  first  position  was  that  of  clerk  and  bookkeeper  with 
a  shipbuilding,  domestic  and  foreign  shipping,  importing  and  trading  company 
in  the  town  of  Sherbrooke,  with  which  he  remained  for  ten  years,  spending  a  part 
of  the  years  1870  and  1871  in  the  city  of  Halifax  as  a  student  in  the  commercial 
college  but  afterward  returning  to  his  old  employers. 

In  1881  Mr.  MacKay  came  to  British  Columbia  and  engaged  in  the  government 
telegraph  and  postoffice  service.  He  was  also  with  the  Canadian  Pacific  Railway 
for  a  time  and  in  1883  was  appointed  general  agent  and  accountant  of  the  British 
Columbia  Express  Company  at  Yale  while  steamboating  was  operated  to  that 
point.  Afterward  at  Ashcroft  he  became  the  secretary,  treasurer,  auditor  and  one 
of  the  directors  respectively  of  that  company,  but  at  length  sold  all  his  interests 
and  resigned  his  position  in  1898  preparatory  to  removal  to  Vancouver.  In  that 
city  he  became  a  shareholder  and  secretary-treasurer  of  a  manufacturing  confec- 
tionery and  biscuit  company  but  resigned  from  that  position  and  removed  to  New 
Westminster,  British  Columbia,  where  he  purchased  a  book  and  stationery  store 
which  he  conducted  for  a  few  years,  selling  the  business,  however,  in  1909. 

Mr.  MacKay  has  been  more  or  less  active  in  public  life,  performing  service  of  a 
varied  yet  important  character.  He  compiled  the  voters'  lists  in  1879,  was  clerk 


JOHN  J.  MACKAY 


BRITISH    COLUMBIA  239 

of  the  county  court  of  Sherbrooke,  Nova  Scotia,  in  1880  and  was  made  notary 
public  in  British  Columbia  in  1887.  He  was  also  school  trustee  and  secretary  of 
the  school  board  in  Ashcroft,  British  Columbia,  from  the  time  the  school  district 
•was  organized  until  his  removal  from  the  town  in  1898.  Seeing  possibilities  for 
the  development  of  agricultural  interests  through  organized  effort,  he  was  largely 
instrumental  in  instituting  and  organizing  the  Inland  Agricultural  Association  of 
British  Columbia,  which  was  the  first  agricultural  society  in  the  province  east  of 
the  Cascade  mountains.  He  served  as  secretary  and  treasurer  of  that  society  until 
his  removal  from  the  town  in  1898.  In  1910  he  was  appointed  treasurer  and 
accountant  of  the  city  of  New  Westminster,  which  position  he  now  fills,  making  a 
creditable  record  in  office  as  the  custodian  of  the  public  funds.  He  is  very  prompt 
and  systematic  in  the  discharge  of  his  duties  and  his  worth  is  widely  acknowledged 
by  all  who  know  aught  of  public  affairs  in  New  Westminster. 

Mr.  MacKay  is  also  a  member  of  the  Board  of  Trade  of  New  Westminster. 
He  votes  with  the  conservative  party  and  was  government  candidate  in  the  district 
of  Yale  for  provincial  election  in  1898,  but  was  defeated  by  Charles  A.  Temlin,  a 
leader  of  the  opposition,  who  became  premier. 

On  the  2oth  of  August,  1891,  at  Hyde  Park,  Massachusetts,  Mr.  MacKay  was 
united  in  marriage  to  Miss  Rebecca  S.  Elliot,  of  Sherbrooke,  Nova  Scotia,  a 
daughter  of  the  late  Henry  Elliot,  who  was  a  son  of  Lieutenant  Dr.  Henry  F. 
Elliot  of  the  Minto  branch  of  the  Elliots  and  cousin  of  Sir  Henry  G.  Elliot,  K.  C. 
M.  G.,  C.  B.,  who  distinguished  himself  both  in  the  army  and  as  a  British  consul 
and  representative.  He  died  in  South  Africa  in  the  year  1913.  Her  grandfather, 
Lieutenant  Elliot,  referred  to  above,  was  wounded  in  the  battle  of  Waterloo  while 
riding  at  the  head  of  his  company.  Mr.  and  Mrs.  MacKay  became  parents  of 
three  children:  Elliot,  born  in  1893 ;  Jean,  who  was  born  in  1899  and  died  in  1911 ; 
and  Donna,  born  in  1903.  The  parents  are  Presbyterians  and  Mr.  MacKay  is  a 
member  of  the  session  at  St.  Andrew's  church  at  New  Westminster.  He  is  also  a 
member  of  the  board  of  managers  of  Westminster  Hall,  the  Presbyterian  Theo- 
logical College  at  Vancouver.  He  was  a  member  of  Kamloops  Lodge,  I.  O.  O.  F., 
and  a  charter  member  of  Ashcroft  Lodge,  I.  O.  O.  F.,  in  which  he  held  the  office 
of  treasurer.  He  has  labored  diligently  in  both  business  and  official  connections, 
accomplishing  what  he  has  undertaken  and  proving  his  right  to  rank  with  the  rep- 
resentative citizens  of  the  community  in  which  he  makes  his  home. 


WALTER    SQUSTER    ROSE. 

To  have  attained  success  before  the  age  of  thirty  Walter  Souster  Rose  must 
be  a  remarkable  young  man,  and  it  can  be  but  ascribed  to  a  natural  insight  into 
conditions  and  circumstances  which  cannot  be  acquired  but  is  to  a  large  extent 
intuitive.  Although  not  yet  twenty-eight  years  of  age,  Mr.  Rose  is  secretary  of 
the  Edmonds  Development  Company,  Ltd.,  and  managing  director  of  the  British 
North  America  Securities  Corporation,  Ltd.,  and  in  these  connections  represents 
two  companies  which  play  an  important  part  in  the  upbuilding  and  growth  of  the 
province.  Careful  of  his  own  interests  and  considerate  of  those  of  others,  Mr. 
Rose  ever  controls  his  actions  with  a  view  toward  civic  improvement  and  must 
be  truly  counted  as  one  of  the  forces  that  have  made  and  are  making  New 
Westminster  a  town  of  metropolitan  proportions.  A  native  of  England,  he  was 
born  August  3,  1885,  and  is  a  son  of  M.  and  Julia  (Souster)  Rose.  His  birthplace 
is  Burton-on-Trent,  and  there  he  attended  grammar  school.  He  commenced  his 
career  by  becoming  a  member  of  the  banking  profession  as  an  employe  of  Lloyd's 
Bank,  Ltd.,  remaining  with  that  well  known  institution  until  1907.  In  1908  we 
find  him  in  New  Westminster,  British  Columbia,  where  he  established  himself  ^as 
a  broker.  His  experience  with  Lloyd's  and  his  natural  ability  soon  brought  him 
the  fore  and  he  became  an  active  factor  in  semi-financial  and  real-estate  organ- 
ations,  being  instrumental  in  organizing  the  Edmonds  Development  Company, 


240  BRITISH    COLUMBIA 

Ltd.,  and  the  British  North  America  Securities  Corporation,  Ltd.  both  of  which 
institutions  are  holders  of  large  tracts  of  real  estate.  With  the  former  company 
he  served  in  the  capacity  of  secretary  and  of  the  latter  he  is  managing  director, 
doing  as  its  head  much  in  extending  its  useful  scope  of  activity.  Capable,  earnest' 
and  conscientious,  shrewd  and  modern  in  his  tendencies,  he  is  a  business  man 
typical  of  the  Canadian  northwest  and  well  fitted  for  its  exploitation  and  develop- 
ment. He  has  made  his  place  in  New  Westminster  as  one  of  the  foremost  young 
business  men  of  the  town  and  is  as  ready  to  promote  the  general  welfare  as  the 
interests  of  the  two  large  corporations  in  which  he  is  a  stockholder. 

On  September  21,  1910,  at  Edmonds,  British  Columbia,  Mr.  Rose  was  united 
in  marriage  to  Miss  Ethel  Mary  Bradley,  a  member  of  an  old  Devonshire  family, 
while  his  own,  the  Rose  family,  were  of  prominence  in  Devonshire,  England. 
Mr.  and  Mrs.  Rose  have  one  son,  Reginald  Walter. 

Although  not  aspiring  to  public  office,  Mr.  Rose  has  ever  taken  a  decided  stand 
upon  political  questions  and  gives  his  support  steadfastly  to  the  conservative 
party.  He  is  a  member  of  the  Church  of  England  and  interested  in  the  extension 
work  of  that  organization.  In  clubdom  he  is  known  as  a  member  of  the  West- 
minster Club  and  there  associates  with  men  to  whose  hearts  is  dear  the  improve- 
ment of  the  city  not  only  along  material  lines  but  also  as  regards  intellectual  and 
moral  upbuilding.  He  is  president  of  the  Burnaby  Lodge,  Sons  of  England,  and 
as  such  keeps  fresh  the  ties  that  bind  the  colony  to  the  mother  country.  Viewed 
from  every  point,  the  career  of  Mr.  Rose  thus  far  has  been  an  entire  success, 
for  he  has  not  only  attained  financial  independence  but  has  won  honor  and  esteem 
by  his  accomplishments,  and  judging  by  what  he  has  done  thus  far,  it  is  safe  to 
prophesy  that  a  distinguished  career  is  in  store  for  him,  a  career  that  will  not  only 
bring  to  him  wealth  and  fame  but  will  have  a  decided  and  stimulating  influence 
upon  the  further  advancement  of  New  Westminster  and  British  Columbia. 


EVERT  L.  KIN  MAN. 

Evert  L.  Kinman  is  the  president  of  the  Imperial  Timber  &  Trading  Company, 
Ltd.,  of  Vancouver.  For  twenty-two  years  he  has  been  connected  with  lumber  and 
mining  interests  in  this  province,  and  as  the  years  have  passed  on  has  made  con- 
tinuous progress,  while  his  success  has  always  been  an  element  in  the  general  busi- 
ness development  as  well  as  in  individual  prosperity.  He  was  born  in  Novelty, 
Knox  county,  Missouri,  March  9,  18/0,  his  parents  being  Anderson  and  Sarah 
(Hinman)  Kinman,  the  former  a  native  of  Indiana  and  the  latter  of  Illinois.  In 
1859  they  became  residents  of  Missouri,  where  the  father  carried  on  farming 
throughout  the  remainder  of  his  life,  passing  away  in  1892,  while  his  wife  sur- 
vived until  1902.  They  were  the  parents  of  nine  children,  Evert  being  the  only 
one  residing  in  Canada. 

After  mastering  the  branches  of  learning  taught  in  the  public  schools  of  his 
native  county,  Evert  L.  Kinman  there  attended  Oak  Lawn  College,  and  then  think- 
ing to  find  better  and  broader  business  opportunities  on  the  Pacific  coast  he  made 
his  way  from  Missouri  to  the  state  of  Washington  and  was  employed  in  various 
sections  of  the  state.  In  the  summer  of  1892  he  came  to  British  Columbia,  where 
he  engaged  in  prospecting,  mining,  timber  cruising  and  lumbering.  He  spent  one 
year  as  government  road  superintendent  in  the  west  Kootenay  district,  and  he  in- 
troduced the  first  steam  engine  ever  used  in  the  logging  camps  of  the  interior  of 
British  Columbia,  this  being  put  into  use  at  Trout  Lake.  He  located  the  greater 
part  of  all  the  timber  in  the  vicinity  of  Trout  Lake,  which  is  now  owned  by  an 
English  corporation.  He  also  located  the  timber  on  the  Duncan  river,  now  owned 
by  the  Royal  Lumber  Company,  and  he  located  the  present  holdings  of  the  Adams 
River  Lumber  Company.  Mr.  Kinman  and  partners  own  one  hundred  and  thirty 
square  miles,  or  eighty-three  thousand  two  hundred  acres,  of  fine  timber  on 


EVERT  L.  KINMAN 


BRITISH    COLUMBIA  243 

Vancouver  island  and  Columbia  river.  In  the  years  of  his  previous  experience  as 
Mr.  Kinman  saw  opportunity  for  judicious  investment  he  kept  adding  to  his  hold- 
ings, which  are  now  extremely  extensive  and  valuable.  He  organized  the  Imperial 
Timber  &  Trading  Company,  Ltd.,  which  was  formed  in  1905  and  of  which  he  is 
the  president  and  managing  director.  They  operate  on  the  coast  of  British  Co- 
lumbia and  are  engaged  in  the  wholesale  lumber  business  throughout  this  province 
and  the  Dominion.  They  also  export  to  European  markets,  much  of  their  product 
going  to  European  ports  by  way  of  the  Suez  canal.  In  1910  he  organized  a  com- 
pany known  as  the  Omineca  Mines,  Ltd.,  operating  near  Hazelton,  British  Colum- 
bia, on  the  Erie  claim  and  Four  Mile  Mountain.  They  own  silver  and  lead  prop- 
erties which  are  now  being  developed  and  they  are  already  shipping  ore  from 
development  work.  For  more  than  two  decades  Mr.  Kinman  has  been  identified 
with  lumber  and  mining  interests  in  this  province,  spending  the  greater  part  of  the 
time  in  the  interior,  although  during  the  last  seven  years  he  has  remained  in  Van- 
couver and  on  the  coast.  He  has  engaged  in  various  different  lines  of  work,  has 
traveled  over  and  explored  much  of  British  Columbia,  and  there  are  few  living 
men  who  have  seen  more  of  this  province  or  are  more  thoroughly  acquainted  with 
its  natural  resources  and  its  possibilities.  In  1898  he  joined  the  gold  rush  to  the 
north,  going  by  way  of  Stikine  river  and  Dease  lake  to  the  divide  between  the 
Pelly  and  Leaird  rivers,  where  he  spent  one  season. 

In  1898,  in  Missouri,  Mr.  Kinman  was  united  in  marriage  to  Miss  Estelle 
Murphy,  a  native  of  Missouri,  and  they  have  three  children :  Holmes  Anderson, 
Marjorie  Ruth  and  Bill.  While  Mr.  Kinman  usually  exercises  his  right  of  fran- 
chise in  support  of  the  liberal  party,  he  has  never  been  active  in  politics.  He  is  a 
member  of  the  Royal  Vancouver  Yacht  Club,  the  Progress  Club,  the  Press  Club 
and  the  Chamber  of  Mines,  and  is  interested  in  all  the  various  projects  which 
have  to  do  with  tiie  upbuilding  of  the  city  and  this  section  of  the  country.  He 
stands  today  among  the  prominent  and  successful  men  of  Vancouver  by  reason  of 
the  fact  that  he  has  overcome  obstacles  and  difficulties  by  energy  and  enterprise. 
He  early  recognized  the  fact  that  there  is  no  royal  road  to  wealth  and  that  the  path 
of  successful  labor  is  an  upward  one.  He  has  never  failed  to  put  forth  the  effort 
necessary  for  advancement  and  his  initiative,  perseverance  and  sound  judgment, 
as  manifest  in  judicious  investments  and  careful  management,  have  brought  him  to 
a  prominent  position  among  the  lumbermen  of  the  northwest. 


CONWAY  EDWARD  CARTWRIGHT. 

Enjoying  a  large  practice  and  well  earned  reputation  as  a  consulting  civil 
•engineer,  Conway  Edward  Cartwright  is  today  regarded  as  one  of  the  repre- 
sentative residents  of  Vancouver.  He  was  born  in  Toronto,  Ontario,  October  14, 
1864,  his  parents  being  the  Rev.  Conway  Edward  and  Mary  Letitia  Cartwright. 
The  family  was  founded  in  the  new  world  by  the  great-great-grandfather,  who 
sailed  from  Yorkshire,  England,  to  America  in  about  1700  and  settled  in  Albany, 
New  York,  where  he  was  married.  At  the  time  of  the  American  revolution  the 
family  remained  loyal  to  England,  being  among  the  United  Empire  Loyalists  who 
left  the  United  States  and  came  to  Canada,  the  great-grandfather  settling  in  Onta- 
rio. The  Rev.  Conway  Edward  Cartwright,  born  at  Kingston,  Ontario,  was  edu- 
cated in  Trinity  College,  Dublin,  Ireland,  from  which  he  was  graduated  with  the 
degree  of  Bachelor  of  Arts.  He  became  a  minister  of  the  Church  of  England  and 
was  rector  of  a  church  at  Kingston,  Ontario,  until  his  retirement  from  the  ministry 
in  1905,  when  he  came  to  Vancouver,  British  Columbia,  where  both  he  and  his  wife 
are  now  living.  He  married  Miss  Mary  Letitia  Johnson,  a  native  of  Belfast, 
Ireland,  in  which  city  the  wedding  ceremony  was  performed.  They  are  the 

irents  of  four  daughters  and  three  sons.    Two  of  the  daughters,  Mrs.  R.  H.  H. 

Alexander  and  Mrs.  A.  J.  Matheson,  now  reside  in  Vancouver.    One  son,  George 


244  BRITISH    COLUMBIA 

S.,  is  a  lieutenant  colonel  in  the  Royal  Engineers  and  lives  in  England.  Another 
son,  Cosmos,  is  in  the  Bureau  of  Mines  at  Ottawa. 

Conway  Edward  Cartwright,  the  eldest  son,  supplemented  his  early  education 
by  study  in  the  Royal  Military  Academy  at  Kingston,  Ontario,  from  which  he  was 
graduated.  With  the  completion  of  his  collegiate  course  he  turned  his  attention 
to  the  practice  of  civil  engineering  on  the  Pontiac  Pacific  Railway  at  Quebec  in 
1885  and  remained  in  that  connection  until  1888,  when  he  went  to  Norfolk,  Vir- 
ginia, where  he  entered  upon  the  private  practice  of  his  profession,  being  chiefly 
engaged  in  railway  construction  work  in  the  southern  and  central  states  until 
1896.  In  that  year  he  became  assistant  chief  engineer  on  the  New  York  &  Ottawa 
Railway  with  headquarters  at  Cornwall,  Ontario,  and  remained  in  that  position  of 
responsibility  until  1899,  when  he  became  associated  with  the  Canadian  Pacific 
Railroad  and  came  to  Vancouver,  which  city  has  continued  to  be  his  home  to  the 
present  time.  In  1905  he  was  made  division  engineer  of  the  Canadian  Pacific 
Railroad,  having  charge  of  the  Pacific  division,  and  continued  as  such  until  1910, 
when  he  resigned  to  enter  upon  the  private  practice  of  his  profession  as  a  consult- 
ing civil  engineer,  in  which  department  of  labor  he  still  continues.  He  has  been 
very  successful  and  now  has  a  large  practice  of  a  distinctively  representative  char- 
acter. The  steps  in  his  orderly  progression  are  easily  discernible.  Each  change 
has  brought  him  a  broader  outlook  and  wider  opportunities,  and  as  the  years 
have  gone  on  he  has  gained  a  creditable  name  and  place  for  himself  in  profes- 
sional circles.  His  high  standing  is  indicated  in  the  fact  that  he  has  been  admitted 
to  membership  in  the  Canadian  Society  of  Civil  Engineers  and  to  the  American 
Railway  and  Maintenance  Association.  He  is  also  a  member  of  the  board  of  man- 
agement of  the  British  Columbia  Land  Surveyors.  He  is  a  director  of  the  Pacific 
May-Otway  Automatic  Fire  Alarms,  Ltd.,  an  automatic  fire  alarm  system,  which 
is  being  used  extensively  all  over  the  world. 

In  1889  Mr.  Cartwright  was  united  in  marriage  to  Miss  Mary  Elizabeth 
Harvey  and  for  fourteen  years  they  have  been  residents  of  Vancouver.  Mrs. 
Cartwright  is  a  daughter  of  the  late  Major  John  Harvey,  of  the  Royal  Artillery 
of  Wexford,  Ireland.  Mr.  Cartwright's  military  history  covers  service  as  lieu- 
tenant of  the  Halifax  Battalion  in  the  Northwest  rebellion  of  1885.  Patriotism 
has  ever  been  one  of  the  strong  characteristics  of  his  life,  and  in  all  matters  of 
general  moment  he  displays  a  public-spirited  citizenship  that  ever  seeks  the  good 
of  city,  province  and  country.  Appreciative  of  the  social  amenities  of  life,  he  is 
connected  with  the  Vancouver  Club,  in  which  he  has  won  merited  popularity. 


RONALD  CAMPBELL  CAMPBELL-JOHNSTON. 

Ronald  Campbell  Campbell-Johnston,  mining  and  metallurgical  engineer,  with 
offices  in  Vancouver,  has  followed  his  profession  in  various  parts  of  the  world 
and  is  well  known  in  mining  circles  through  his  contributions  to  scientific  journals. 
He  was  born  at  Oban,  Argyleshire,  Scotland,  September  18,  1863,  his  parents  be- 
ing Alexander  R.  and  Frances  (Bury-Palliser)  Campbell- Johnston,  the  former  a 
native  of  Scotland  and  the  latter  of  Ireland.  The  father  was  minister  extraordi- 
nary and  envoy  plenipotentiary  from  Great  Britain  to  China,  being  for  thirty 
years  .connected  with  the  diplomatic  service.  He  took  over  Hong  Kong  from  the 
Chinese  for  the  British  government  and  accomplished  much  else  that  has  found 
important  place  on  the  pages  of  history.  He  died  in  1896,  after  reaching  the  age 
of  eighty  years.  The  Campbell-Johnston  estate  in  Scotland  is  known  as  Carnsal- 
loch  and  is  situated  on  the  Nith  river  in  Dumfriesshire.  It  has  been  in  possession 
of  the  family  since  the  sixteenth  century  and  is  now  occupied  by  the  eldest  son, 
Captain  A.  F.  Campbell- Johnston.  It  is  a  very  extensive  and  beautiful  estate  and 
King  Charles  I  granted  to  the  family  a  charter  for  the  exclusive  right  to  the 
salmon  fisheries  on  the  Nith  river  for  a  distance  of  twenty-five  miles  from  the 
estate  to  the  mouth  of  the  river. 


RONALD  C.  CAMPBELL-JOHNSTON 


BRITISH    COLUMBIA  247 

The  mother  of  R.  C.  Campbell- Johnston  was  a  sister  of  Admiral  Bury-Palliser, 
who  commanded  the  British  fleet  on  this  coast  from  1900  to  1905.  She  was  also 
a  first  cousin  of  Sir  John  Palliser,  who  crossed  Canada  to  the  Pacific  with  Mac- 
Kenzie  in  1838,  and  it  is  in  his  honor  that  the  Palliser  range  of  mountains  has  been 
so  called.  Another  cousin  and  a  brother  of  Sir  John  Palliser  was  Major  Edward 
Palliser,  whose  name  is  inseparably  connected  with  Canadian  history  because  of 
the  prominent  part  which  he  took  in  the  Kiel  rebellion.  He  was  the  man  who  took 
a  canoe  loaded  with  ammunition  to  a  fort — a  task  full  of  hazard — and  successfully 
passed  through  the  enemy's  forces  into  the  safety  of  the  fort.  He  was  a  very 
courageous  and  distinguished  man. 

Ronald  C.  Campbell- Johnston  was  educated  at  Sherbourne  School,  England, 
and  in  the  Royal  School  of  Mines  at  London,  from  which  he  was  graduated  in 
1881.  He  then  arranged  to  serve  his  apprenticeship  as  a  mining  engineer  with 
John  Taylor  &  Sons,  celebrated  representatives  of  the  profession  in  London,  and 
while  in  their  employ  he  spent  much  time  in  charge  of  mines  in  India.  He  served 
his  apprenticeship  as  metallurgical  engineer  under  his  father-in-law,  Alfred  Senior 
Merry,  a  partner  in  the  firm  of  H.  H.  Vivian  &  Company,  who  refined  nickel,  co- 
balt and  copper  ores  at  Swansea,  Wales.  In  1888  he  came  to  the  United  States  in 
the  employ  of  Vivian  &  Company,  in  charge  of  the  zinc  mines  at  Joplin,  Missouri. 
There  he  remained  for  two  years.  He  then  returned  to  Swansea  and  was  assigned 
to  the  nickel  mines  at  Sudbury,  Ontario,  where  he  continued  for  a  year.  At  the 
close  of  1890  he  severed  his  connection  with  the  firm  and  came  to  British  Colum- 
bia, taking  up  his  abode  in  Vancouver.  There  he  opened  an  assay  and  consultation 
office,  which  he  maintained  until  1896,  when  he  went  to  the  Kootenay  and  Boun- 
dary country,  spending  ten  years  in  that  locality,  two  years  of  which  time  he  was 
consulting  engineer  for  Mackenzie  &  Mann,  while  the  remainder  of  the  time  was 
devoted  to  the  general  practice  of  his  profession.  In  1906  he  returned  to  Vancou- 
ver and  again  opened  an  office  as  consulting  engineer.  When  the  Ground  Hog 
anthracite  coal  fields  first  attracted  attention  in  1910  he  began  to  act  for  interests 
there,  but  this  requires  only  a  comparatively  small  part  of  his  time.  His  practice 
covers  a  large  area  and  he  has  clients  on  Vancouver  island,  Queen  Charlotte 
islands  and  all  along  the  British  Columbia  coast  to  the  Portland  canal  and  in  the 
interior  from  the  Similkameen  valley  to  the  Peace  river.  His  work  covers  all  the 
commercial  fuels  and  metals,  including  gold,  silver,  copper,  lead,  iron  and  zinc. 
His  wide  study  and  his  broad,  practical  experience  have  placed  him  in  a  foremost 
position  among  the  mining  and  metallurgical  engineers  of  the  northwest  and  his 
practice  is  extensive  and  important. 

On  the  6th  of  January,  1886,  near  Swansea,  Wales,  Mr.  Campbell- Johnston  was 
married  to  Miss  Amy  Merry,  a  daughter  of  Alfred  Senior  Merry,  a  representative 
of  an  old  Derbyshire  family.  The  family  estate  is  Barton  Hall  and  is  one  of  the 
very  few  estates  that  have  been  held  continuously  by  one  family  since  the  time  of 
William  the  Conqueror.  It  is  situated  at  Dovedale,  Derbyshire,  England,  and  is  a 
most  beautiful  place.  Mrs.  Campbell- Johnston  always  accompanies  her  husband 
in  his  travels.  They  have  traveled  extensively  in  India,  the  .United  States  and 
Canada  and  she  knows  the  province  of  British  Columbia  as  perhaps  few  women 
do.  She  was  the  first  white  woman  who  ever  set  foot  upon  certain  parts  of  the 
Ground  Hog  and  Kootenay  districts.  She  is  well  posted  on  the  history  of  the 
Indians  and  the  legends  of  the  tribes.  In  the  public  museum  is  a  case  bearing  a 
large  collection  of  curios,  Indian  relics  and  costijoies,  the  latter  consisting  prin- 
cipally of  those  of  the  famous  medicine  men  and  witches,  secured  from  the  tribes 
of  the  Upper  Skeena  river,  while  the  relics  came  from  Naas  river,  Vancouver 
and  Queen  Charlotte  islands  and  other  parts  of  the  province.  To  this  collection 
Mr.  Campbell- Johnston  adds  from 'time  to  time  upon  his  return  from  various 
expeditions.  He  also  has  some  very  interesting  curios  from  India.  He  writes  for 
the  scientific  journals  on  matters  pertaining  to  geology,  minerals  and  metallurgy 
and  his  wife  also  displays  most  creditable  literary  merit  as  a  writer  of  travel  stories 
and  also  articles  for  the  magazines  and  local  press  on  woman  suffrage,  in  behalf 
of  which  she  is  a  sincere  worker.  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Campbell- Johnston  have  three 


248  BRITISH    COLUMBIA 

children,  two  sons  and  a  daughter :  Amy  Campbell,  who  is  the  wife  of  J.  R. 
Armytage-Moore,  of  County  Cavan,  Ireland;  Ronald  Alfred,  a  journalist  con- 
nected with  the  Vancouver  World;  and  Alexander  Campbell  Campbell-Johnston, 
now  attending  college. 

In  politics  Mr.  Campbell-Johnston  is  a  liberal  and  takes  a  deep  interest  in  en- 
actments yet  is  not  a  worker  in  party  ranks.  His  professional  services  have  car- 
ried him  into  various  sections  of  the  country  and  no  man  is  able  to  speak  with 
greater  authority  upon  the  northwest,  its  conditions,  its  resources  and  its  possi- 
bilities. His  ideals  of  life  have  ever  been  high  and  he  constantly  works  toward 
them  whether  in  professional  or  other  connections. 


CHARLES  BELL  BUDDLE 

Charles  Bell  Buddie,  a  barrister  who  has  become  recognized  as  a  well  quali- 
fied and  able  member  of  the  Vancouver  bar,  was  born  in  Auckland,  New  Zealand, 
January  25,  1884.  His  parents  were  Charles  Frederick  and  Eliza  (Bell)  Buddie, 
the  former  a  barrister  who  was  engaged  in  practice  in  New  Zealand  for  a  number 
of  years.  The  son  attended  Wellington  College,  Wellington,  New  Zealand,  and 
subsequently  entered  the  University  of  New  Zealand  in  preparation  for  the  prac- 
tice of  law,  completing  his  law  course  in  1909,  at  which  time  the  LL.  B.  degree 
was  conferred  upon  him.  The  following  year  he  arrived  in  Vancouver  and 
entered  upon  active  practice  in  connection  with  the  firm  of  Whiteside  &  Robert- 
son, barristers.  He  was  called  to  the  bar  of  Vancouver  in  1911,  at  which  time 
he  became  a  partner  in  the  firm  of  McAvoy,  Whiteside  &  Robertson.  This  rela- 
tion was  maintained  until  the  fall  of  1911,  when  Mr.  Whiteside  and  Mr.  Buddie 
formed  a  partnership  that  still  exists.  In  politics  Mr.  Buddie  is  a  conservative. 
He  is  a  member  of  the  University  Club. 


FRANCIS  HENRY  CUNNINGHAM. 

Public  office  finds  in  Francis  Henry  Cunningham  a  worthy  incumbent  in  the 
position  of  inspector  of  fisheries.  He  has  been  continuously  connected  with  the 
civil  service  of  Canada  since  August,  1883,  and  in  his  present  position  makes  his 
home  in  New  Westminster.  He  was  born  on  the  3d  of  May,  1865,  at  Topcroft, 
Norfolk,  England,  a  son  of  Henry  and  Sarah  (Kemp)  Cunningham.  His  father 
was  a  progressive  farmer  and  took  a  general  interest  in  the  affairs  of  the  county 
in  which  he  lived,  acting  at  one  time  as  representative  on  the  board  of  workhouse 
guardians. 

The  son  pursued  his  early  education  in  the  grammar  schools  of  Norwich  and 
Banham,  England,  and  when  his  text-books  were  put  aside  began  preparing  for 
the  business  of  an  auctioneer,  being  articled  with  Messrs.  H.  &  J.  Read,  of  Beccles, 
Suffolk,  England.  He  was  but  eighteen  years  of  age  when  he  entered  the  civil 
service  of  Canada  in  August,  1883.  He  filled  the  position  of  accountant,  inspector 
of  hatcheries,  superintendent  of  fish  culture  and  at  the  present  writing,  in  1913,  is 
the  chief  inspector  of  fisheries  for  this  province  under  the  Dominion  government. 
He  is  greatly  interested  in  exhibition  work,  having  been  a  director  of  the  Ottawa 
exhibition,  and  is  at  present  on  the  executive  of  the  Royal  Agricultural  &  Indus- 
trial Society  of  New  Westminster.  He  seej<s  in  these  connections  to  stimulate 
activity  and  improvement  along  the  lines  indicated. 

Mr.  Cunningham  was  connected  with  the  Governor  General  Foot  Guards  as  a 
non-commissioned  officer  and  served  through  the  Northwest  rebellion  of  1885, 
taking  part  in  the  engagement  at  Cut  Knife  Hill.  He  now  holds  the  Canadian 
medal  with  clasp. 


FRANCIS  H.  CUNNINGHAM 


BRITISH    COLUMBIA  251 

Mr.  Cunningham's  fraternal  relations  are  with  the  Masonic  lodge  and  the 
Independent  Order  of  Foresters.  He  is  also  connected  with  the  New  West- 
minster Club  and  his  religious  belief  is  that  of  the  Methodist  church.  His  home 
life,  which  is  pleasant,  had  its  inception  in  his  marriage,  in  September,  1885,  to 
Miss  Florence  Emily  Bradley,  a  daughter  of  Samuel  Bradley,  who  was  a  pioneer 
of  the  county  of  Carleton,  Ontario,  and  was  interested  for  many  years  in  the 
lumber  business.  Their  children  are :  Ethel  Lucy,  now  the  wife  of  C.  E.  Goodall, 
of  Ottawa;  Henry  Clifton;  Hugh  Stone;  Francis  Bradley;  and  Joseph  Elliott. 


JAMES    ALEXANDER    CUNNINGHAM. 

James  Alexander  Cunningham  was  a  resident  of  British  Columbia  at  a  period 
antedating  the  founding  of  Vancouver ;  in  fact,  he  is  one  of  the  native  sons  of  the 
province  and  has  always  remained  within  its  borders.  For  a  considerable  period 
he  has  continued  in  business  in  Vancouver,  being  managing  director  of  the  British 
Columbia  Refining  Company,  in  which  connection  he  controls  important  and 
extensive  interests.  He  was  born  at  New  Westminster,  September  17,  1867,  and  is 
a  son  of  Thomas  and  Emily  (Woodman)  Cunningham,  the  former  a  native  of  the 
north  of  Ireland  and  the  latter  of  St.  Thomas,  Ontario.  The  father  came  from 
the  Emerald  isle  to  the  new  world  in  his  boyhood  days,  and  after  residing  for  some 
time  in  Kingston,  Ontario,  came  to  British  Columbia,  making  the  journey  by  way 
of  the  Isthmus  route  and  up  the  Pacific  coast.  He  went  immediately  to  the 
Cariboo,  where  he  engaged  in  mining  for  a  short  time,  but  soon  afterward  came 
to  New  Westminster,  where  in  1859  he  established  a  general  store.  Gradually, 
however,  he  closed  out  different  lines  and  confined  his  attention  exclusively  to  the 
hardware  trade,  continuing  in  the  business  in  that  city  until  1900,  making  a  record 
of  forty  years  as  a  merchant  in  one  town,  so  that  his  name  is  inseparably  asso- 
ciated with  the  history  of  its  commercial  development.  For  many  years,  how- 
ever, he  made  a  study  of  horticulture,  gaining  expert  knowledge  of  the  scientific 
phases  of  the  business,  added  to  practical  experience  which  he  acquired.  About 
1900  he  was  prevailed  upon  by  the  provincial  government  to  accept  the  position 
of  provincial  horticulturist.  His  love  for  the  work  prompted  him  to  undertake 
this  service,  and  he  is  still  acceptably  filling  the  position.  His  wife,  Mrs.  Emily 
Cunningham,  came  from  St.  Thomas,  Ontario,  to  British  Columbia  by  way  of 
the  Panama  route  in  company  with  her  sister,  the  wife  of  the  Rev.  Edward 
White,  who  was  the  first  Methodist  missionary  in  British  Columbia.  They  came 
on  the  same  ship  with  the  late  Hon.  John  Robson,  ex-premier  of  British  Columbia, 
and  in  the  year  1864  Miss  Woodman  became  the  wife  of  Thomas  Cunningham  in 
New  Westminster.  She  is  well  preserved  and  very  active  at  the  age  of  seventy- 
two  years  and  teaches  a  class  in  the  Methodist  Sunday  school. 

In  the  public  schools  of  his  native  city  James  A.  Cunningham  pursued  his  edu- 
cation and  was  there  a  schoolmate  of  Sir  Richard  McBride,  Judge  F.  W.  Howay 
and  Hon.  W.  W.  B.  Mclnnes.  Later  he  attended  the  Willamette  University  at 
Salem,  Oregon.  He  started  in  the  business  world  in  connection  with  the  hard- 
ware trade  in  New  Westminster  and  for  twenty-three  years  was  manager  of  the 
Cunningham  Hardware  Company.  For  twelve  years  of  that  period  he  also  trav- 
eled throughout  British  Columbia  in  the  interests  of  the  business,  making  a  trip 
each  spring  and  fall.  He  sold  to  all  the  merchants  at  camps  and  trading  posts 
in  the  early  days  when  nearly  all  the  travel  was  by  stage  or  private  conveyance. 
He  always  carried  a  gun,  ready  for  an  emergency,  and  many  times  he  slept  in  the 
open.  It  was  not  an  unusual  thing  to  kill  game  anywhere  along  the  way,  such  was 
the  unsettled  condition  of  the  country.  After  his  retirement  from  active  con- 
nection with  the  hardware  trade  Mr.  Cunningham  was  for  five  years  managing 
director  of  the  Western  Steamboat  Company,  operating  a  line  of  steamers  on  the 
Fraser  river.  He  was  also  half  owner  in  the  Western  Oil  &  Supply 
Company.  His  prominence  as  a  citizen  and  business  man  in  New  West- 

Vol.  HI— 9 


252  BRITISH    COLUMBIA 

minster  was  further  indicated  in  the  fact  that  he  was  president  of  the 
Board  of  Trade  there  in  1908  and  1909.  He  is  still  president  of  the  Vulcan 
Iron  Works  of  New  Westminster  and  is  director  of  the  British  Columbia 
Accident  Insurance  Company.  Since  1910  he  has  been  managing  director 
of  the  British  Columbia  Refining  Company,  to  which  he  now  gives  his 
undivided  attention,  and  under  his  control  the  business  has  increased,  becoming 
an  important  productive  industry.  They  bring  the  crude  oil  from  California  and 
have  a  large  refinery  at  Port  Moody,  refining  fifteen  hundred  barrels  of  oil  per 
day  and  furnishing  much  of  the  fuel  and  refined  oil  that  is  used  in  the  province. 
This  is  the  largest  refinery  in  western  Canada  and  the  only  asphalt  refinery  in 
the  Dominion.  As  is  indicated,  the  business  is  one  of  extensive  proportions,  and 
at  its  head  as  managing  director  is  a  man  capable  of  controlling  important  and 
complex  interests,  his  guidance  of  its  affairs  being  based  upon  a  thorough  under- 
standing of  conditions  and  sound  judgment.  He  is,  furthermore,  connected  with 
various  interests  of  a  public  or  semi-public  character.  He  is  now  a  member  of 
the  Board  of  Trade  of  New  Westminster  and  belongs  also  to  the  Vancouver  and 
Canadian  Manufacturers  Association.  Since  1906  he  has  been  a  justice  of  the 
peace,  and  his  military  service  covers  almost  a  quarter  of  century  as  sergeant  in 
the  Royal  Artillery  from  1885  until  1909. 

On  the  26th  of  April,  1888,  in  New  Westminster,  Mr.  Cunningham  was  mar- 
ried to  Miss  Marion  Lee  De  Beck,  a  daughter  of  Howard  L.  De  Beck,  a  pioneer 
lumber  merchant  of  British  Columbia.  Mrs.  Cunningham  was  born  in  Victoria, 
and  is  therefore  one  of  the  native  daughters  of  the  province.  She  is  a  graduate 
of  the  Ladies'  College  at  Ottawa  and  is  an  accomplished  pianist.  Mr.  and  Mrs. 
Cunningham  have  three  children:  Walter  M.,  who  has  the  distinction  of  being 
the  only  native  son  of  a  native  son  and  a  native  daughter  of  British  Columbia ; 
Evelyn  Lee ;  and  Helen  Muriel. 

Since  age  gave  him  the  right  of  franchise  Mr.  Cunningham  has  taken  an  active 
interest  in  politics  and  is  now  a  member  of  the  Conservative  Club  of  New  West- 
minster. He  is  also  a  member  of  the  New  Westminster  Club,  and  he  belongs  to 
King  Solomon  Lodge,  No.  17,  A.  F.  &  A.  M.,  and  to  the  Royal  Arch  Chapter.  He 
is  likewise  connected  with  the  Hoo  Hoos  and  in  191 1  was  vicegerent  snark.  His 
religious  belief  is  that  of  the  Methodist  church.  All  who  know  Mr.  Cunning- 
ham— and  his  friends  are  many — speak  of  him  in  terms  of  high  regard.  A  life- 
long resident  of  the  province,  he  has  witnessed  much  of  its  development,  his 
memory  going  back  to  the  days  when  the  Pacific  coast  country  was  largely  a 
pioneer  district  and  into  various  regions  civilization  had  not  yet  penetrated. 
There  were  great  sections  of  unclaimed  timber  lands  and  undeveloped  valley 
lands.  Mr.  Cunningham  rejoices  in  what  has  been  accomplished  as  the  years 
have  gone  by  and  has  borne  his  part  in  the  work  of  improvement,  his  labors  being 
a  service  of  signal  usefulness  in  many  ways. 


JAMES  HENRY  VIDAL. 


One  of  the  most  representative,  able  and  successful  men  of  New  Westminster 
is  James  Henry  Vidal,  who  for  twenty-four  years  has  lived  in  the  city,  his  activi- 
ties touching  and  influencing  many  phases  of  municipal  advancement.  He  is 
engaged  in  the  real-estate  business  and  has  built  up  an  important  and  growing 
patronage  along  this  line.  He  was  born  on  the  28th  of  March,  1864,  in  Sarnia, 
Ontario,  the  fourth  son  of  the  late  Senator  Alex  Vidal,  of  that  city. 

James  H.  Vidal  acquired  his  early  education  in  the  public  schools  of  his  native 
community  and  afterward  attended  Upper  Canada  College  in  Toronto.  After  lay- 
ing aside  his  books  he  entered  the  service  of  the  Canadian  Bank  of  Commerce 
and  after  eight  years  and  a  half  resigned  his  position  to  come  west,  arriving  in 
New  Westminster  in  the  spring  of  1889.  He  has  since  that  time  thoroughly  iden- 
tified himself  with  the  interests  of  the  city  and  is  known  as  one  of  the  most  sub- 


JAMES  H.  VIDAL 


BRITISH    COLUMBIA  255 

stantial  and  public-spirited  of  the  early  settlers.  At  first,  in  common  with  a  great 
many  others,  he  engaged  in  a  variety  of  occupations,  participating  in  the  harvest- 
ing of  a  "crop"  of  salmon  during  a  "big  year"  at  the  original  Phoenix  cannery, 
near  Steveston.  He  was  afterward  appointed  to  the  staff  of  the  land  registry 
office,  where  he  worked  with  signal  success  for  over  six  years.  Upon  retiring  from 
government  service  he  entered  a  new  field  of  labor  and  for  ten  years  thereafter 
was  identified  with  the  daily  and  weekly  British  Columbian.  At  the  end  of  that 
time  he  was  appointed  justice  of  the  peace  and  later  turned  his  attention  to  the 
real-estate  business,  joining  a  local  firm  in  whose  interests  he  conducted  successful 
operations  for  five  years,  eventually  going  into  business  for  himself.  He  handles 
a  great  deal  of  valuable  property  and  by  his  sound  judgment,  his  discrimination 
and  his  keen  business  ability  has  made  his  enterprise  profitable  not  only  to  himself 
but  to  his  clients  also. 

During  the  twenty-four  years  he  has  lived  in  New  Westminster  Mr.  Vidal 
has  identified  himself  with  many  of  the  enterprises  affecting  municipal  growth 
and  advancement  and  the  upbuilding  of  the  neighboring  sections.  He  assisted  in 
promoting  the  Fruit  Growers  Association,  the  British  Columbia  Live  Stock  Asso- 
ciation and  the  British  Columbia  Dairymen's  Association,  and  for  over  twenty 
years  has  been  an  active  member  of  the  Royal  Agricultural  and  Industrial  Society 
of  British  Columbia,  of  which  he  has  been  a  director  for  many  years.  Always  a 
devotee  of  outdoor  sports  and  fresh  air  exercise,  he  has  entered  with  enthusiasm 
into  indoor  sports  also  and  has  replaced  the  field  sports  of  his  eastern  days  by  trap 
shooting,  cricket  and  rifle  shooting.  For  three  years  he  was  secretary  of  the  Gun 
Club  and  took  a  leading  part  in  two  of  the  annual  bench  shows  and  was  for  one 
year  a  gymnasium  instructor  in  the  Young  Men's  Christian  Association.  For 
the  last  three  years  he  has  been  captain  of  the  Civilian  Rifle  Association  and  was 
one  of  the  founders  of  the  New  Westminster  Chess  Club.  In  club  circles  and  in 
general  society  he  is  well  known  and  prominent  but  is  not  affiliated  with  any 
secret  organization.  He  is  a  liberal  conservative  in  his  political  beliefs  and  has 
filled  various  offices  in  the  local  association,  being  now  vice  president  for  the  city 
of  New  Westminster.  Thus  far,  however,  he  has  taken  no  active  part  in  municipal 
government,  preferring  to  concentrate  his  attention  upon  his  business  affairs, 
which  are  capably  conducted,  making  him  one  of  the  powerful  elements  in  the 
business  advancement  of  the  community. 

In  October,  1907,  Mr.  Vidal  married  Mrs.  Ralph,  a  native  of  England. 


JOHN    WALSH. 

The  death  of  John  Walsh,  who  was  accidentally  drowned  in  the  Fraser  river 
in  1908,  deprived  New  Westminster  of  one  of  the  most  able  men  in  her  official 
service,  a  man  whose  ability  and  energy  had  carried  him  forward  to  an  important 
position  in  the  profession  of  civil  engineering  and  whose  accomplishments  along 
this  line  had  proved  of  signal  benefit  to  the  city  where  he  made  his  home.  He 
was  born  April  15,  1850,  at  Goodrich,  Ontario,  a  son  of  Morris  and  Mary  Walsh, 

)th  of  whom  have  passed  away. 
John  Walsh  acquired  his  education  in  the  public  schools  of  his  native  com- 

mnity  and   after   laying  aside   his   books   served   an   apprenticeship   at   steam 

igineering,  finally  obtaining  his  permit  to  practice  this  profession.  After  obtain- 
ing his  engineer's  papers  he  was  employed  as  engineer  at  Bell's  Furniture  Factory 
it  Wingham,  Ontario,  remaining  in  the  employ  of  that  concern  for  fifteen  years 
and  gaining  during  that  time  the  respect  and  confidence  of  his  superiors  and  the 
ligh  regard  of  all  who  were  associated  with  him.  Eventually,  thinking  that  the 
west  offered  larger  opportunities  for  progress  in  his  special  field,  he  went  to 
Alberta  and  settled  in  Lacombe,  where  for  one  year  he  engaged  in  farming. 
At  the  end  of  that  time,  however,  he  came  to  British  Columbia  and  here  remained 

respected  and  highly  esteemed  resident  until  his  death.     Soon  after  his  arrival 


256  BRITISH    COLUMBIA 

he  again  underwent  an  examination  in  engineering  and,  after  receiving  his  papers, 
he  entered  the  employ  of  the  city.  He  had  not  time  to  accomplish  all  of  the 
important  work  which  he  had  planned,  his  efforts  being  cut  off  by  an  untimely 
death,  but  during  the  term  of  his  service  he  proved  his  ability,  energy  and  public 
spirit  in  a  conclusive  way,  becoming  well  known  in  professional  and  business 
circles  of  the  city  and  respected  and  esteemed  wherever  he  was  known. 

On  the  ist  of  June,  1880,  Mr.  Walsh  was  united  in  marriage  to  Miss  Sarah 
Ann  Irvin,  a  daughter  of  Robert  and  Lydia  Catherine  Irvin,  the  former  a  prom- 
inent farmer  of  Wingham.  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Walsh  became  the  parents  of  the 
following  children:  Cassie,  Olive  Maude,  Lizzie,  Morris,  William  J.,  Adeline, 
George,  Robert  J.,  Martha  Ann,  Gladys  Helen  and  Edward,  all  of  whom  are  living 
except  Lizzie,  and  George.  The  family  are  devout  members  of  the  Methodist 
church  and  are  well  known  in  religious  and  social  circles  of  New  Westminster. 

Mr.  Walsh  met  his  death  by  drowning,  falling  off  the  Lulu  Island  bridge, 
upon  which  he  was  working,  into  the  Eraser  river.  Owing  to  the  large  amount 
of  wood  which  had  drifted  against  the  piers  of  this  bridge  it  had  been  decided 
to  send  three  men,  all  board  of  works'  employes,  to  set  the  wood  floating  down 
stream.  Mr.  Walsh  and  two  companions  undertook  the  task,  and  in  the  course 
of  the  work  the  accident  occurred  which  resulted  in  his  death.  Assistance  was 
at  once  procured  but  it  was  unavailing,  Mr.  Walsh  dying  in  the  discharge  of  the 
duties  which  he  had  so  ably  performed  during  life.  His  wife  survives  him  and 
resides  in  New  Westminster,  where  she  is  well  known  and  popular,  her  genuine 
personal  worth  and  her  excellent  qualities  of  mind  and  character  having  won  her 
the  regard  and  esteem  of  all  who  come  in  contact  with  her. 


PETER  F.  SHEEHAN. 

It  seems  that  the  lower  ranks  of  life  are  overcrowded  and  that  it  is  a  true, 
although  somewhat  trite,  saying  that  "there  is  always  room  at  the  top."  The  great 
majority  seem  not  to  possess  the  ambition  or  the  ability  to  reach  positions  of  leader- 
ship, but  here  and  there  are  found  men  who  are  willing  to  pay  the  price  of  close 
application,  unflagging  industry  and  unfaltering  perseverance  in  order  to  win 
success.  Such  a  man  is  Peter  F.  Sheehan,  of  Vancouver,  well  known  as  a  prom- 
inent representative  of  timber  interests  in  British  Columbia.  He  was  born  at  East 
Tawas,  Michigan,  on  Saginaw  Bay,  July  25,  1873,  and  is  a  son  of  Timothy  and 
Ellen  (O'Connell)  Sheehan,  the  former  a  native  of  Peterboro,  Ontario,  and  the 
latter  of  London,  Ontario.  They  were  married  in  Saginaw,  Michigan,  and  are 
numbered  among  the  pioneer  residents  of  the  east  Saginaw  district,  having  settled 
there  in  the  '6os.  They  now  reside  at  Bay  City,  Michigan,  which  has  been  their 
home  for  the  past  quarter  of  a  century.  Mr.  Sheehan  is  now  retired,  but  was  for 
many  years  connected  with  the  Michigan  Land  &  Lumber  Company,  and  with  the 
Morgan  Land  &  Lumber  Company,  of  both  of  which  he  was  general  manager. 
He  also  had  numerous  personal  holdings  aside  from  his  financial  connection  with 
those  companies.  Although  Michigan  was  his  place  of  residence  from  1888  until 
1906,  all  of  his  business  operations  were  in  Ontario. 

Peter  F.  Sheehan  pursued  his  education  in  the  St.  James  parochial  school  of 
Bay  City,  Michigan,  and  at  the  age  of  fifteen  years  entered  into  his  father's 
employ  in  the  lumber  business  and  was  connected  with  him  for  sixteen  years, 
gaining  thorough,  comprehensive  and  expert  knowledge  along  the  lines  with  which 
he  is  still  connected.  All  of  his  work  during  that  period  was  in  Ontario,  where  he 
was  inspecting  timber,  and  he  was  in  charge  of  various  operations  for  these  com- 
panies, the  duties  of  which  required  a  thoroughly  experienced  and  capable  man- 
ager. From  1906  until  the  early  part  of  1909  Mr.  Sheehan  was  with  the  Port 
Blakeley  Mill  Company,  of  Port  Blakeley,  Washington,  which,  up  to  the  time  of 
its  destruction  by  fire,  was  the  largest  mill  in  the  world.  The  importance  and 


BRITISH    COLUMBIA  257 

extent  of  his  operations  in  connection  with  various  departments  of  the  timber 
and  lumber  trade  largely  made  him  an  authority  upon  different  phases  of  the 
business.  In  May,  1909,  he  came  to  Vancouver  and  a  few  months  afterwards 
entered  the  employ  of  the  Fraser  River  Lumber  Company,  now  the  Canadian 
Western  Lumber  Company,  and  remained  a  year  and  a  half.  In  1910,  in  connec- 
tion with  John  Duffy,  he  opened  a  timber  office  in  the  Fairfield  building,  which 
they  continued  until  the  completion  of  the  Pacific  building,  where  they  have  since 
occupied  a  well  appointed  suite  of  rooms.  In  1913  they  were  joined  in  business 
by  H.  O.  Dempster,  B.  Sc.,  C.  E.,  B.  C.  L.  S.,  O.  L.  S.,  the  firm  now  being  known 
as  Sheehan,  Duffy  &  Dempster.  The  third  partner  is  an  expert  surveyor,  being 
retained  by  the  provinces  of  British  Columbia  and  Ontario  as  official  surveyor. 
The  company  is  engaged  in  inspecting  and  surveying  timber  and  timber  lands  for 
clients.  They  have  a  large  consultation  practice  among  persons  wishing  to  buy 
or  sell  and  who  before  entering  into  negotiations  for  disposing  of  or  purchasing 
property  wish  to  have  expert  advice  and  reliable  statistics.  Among  their  clients 
are  some  of  the  largest  firms  on  the  Pacific  coast.  This  is  the  only  organized 
company  in  the  province  conducting  a  business  of  this  nature,  and  there  opinions 
and  reports  are  considered  as  authority.  Both  Mr.  Sheehan  and  Mr.  Duffy  have 
made  a  life  work  of  the  timber  an.d  lumber  business,  having  had  many  years 
experience  in  this  line,  and  as  Mr.  Dempster  has  won  an  enviable  record  as  a 
surveyor  it  can  be  readily  understood  that  the  company  is  well  fitted  for  the 
business  in  which  it  is  engaged. 

Mr.  Sheehan  is  independent  in  politics.  He  is  a  member  of  St.  Patrick's 
Catholic  church  and  of  the  Knights  of  Columbus.  Owing  to  the  importance  and 
extent  of  his  business,,  his  time  and  attention  are  chiefly  concentrated  thereon, 
yet  all  who  meet  him  find  him  a  courteous,  friendly  gentleman,  kindly  and  affable 
in  manner  and,  as  someone  has  expressed  it,  "with  a  heart  and  mind  as  big  as  he 
is."  Substantial  and  commendable  traits  of  character,  as  well  as  business  discern- 
ment and  capable  management  have  been  important  elements  in  his  success. 


JOHN    HALES    SWEET. 

One  of  the  barristers  in  Vancouver  and  one  of  the  most  progressive  and 
public-spirited  men  in  the  city  is  John  Hales  Sweet,  practicing  at  the  bar  as  a 
member  of  the  firm  of  Bond  &  Sweet.     He  was  born  in  Dalhousie,  New  Bruns- 
wick, on  the  1 3th  of  October,  1878,  and  is  a  son  of  Rev.  John  Hales  Sweet  and 
Mrs.  Sweet,  who  was  in  her  maidenhood  Miss  Eva  Janet  Vial.    The  father  was 
)rn  in  London,  England,  and  was  educated  for  the  ministry  at  St.  Augustin's 
"heological  College  at  Canterbury,  from  which  he  was  graduated  in  1870.    Imme- 
liately  afterward  he  came  to  Canada,  taking  up  his  ministerial  work  at  Stone- 
im,  Quebec,  whence  he  went  to  New  Carlisle  and  then  to  Paspebiac.     He  was 
iter  stationed  at  Dalhousie,  New  Brunswick,  until  1880,  in  which  year  he  was 
;nt  to  Newcastle,  that  province,  where  he  remained  until  1895.     From  New- 
istle  he  went  to  Victoria,  British  Columbia,  and  there  became  rector  of  St. 
fames   parish,  in  which  capacity  he  still  continues,  doing  a  great  deal  of  earnest, 
>ncentrated  and  beneficial  work. 

In  the  acquirement  of  an  education  John  Hales   Sweet  attended   Harkin's 
academy  at  Newcastle,  New  Brunswick,  and  afterward  entered  the  University  of 
lew  Brunswick,  at  Fredericton,  from  which  he  was  graduated  with  the  degree  of 
5.  A.  in  1899.    Immediately  afterward  he  joined  his  father  at  Victoria  and  took  up 
the  study  of  law  with  the  firm  of  Bodwell  &  Duff,  being  called  to  the  bar  of  this 
province  in  1902.    He  began  the  active  practice  of  his  profession  in  Victoria,  where 
he  remained  until  1904,  when  he  came  to  Vancouver,  forming  a  partnership  with 
Lambert  Bond  under  the  firm  name  of  Bond  &  Sweet,  a  connection  which  he 
still  retains. 


258  BRITISH    COLUMBIA 

During  his  residence  in  Victoria,  Mr.  Sweet  was  lieutenant  in  the  Fifth  Regi- 
ment, Canadian  Artillery,  and  in  Vancouver  he  aided  in  organizing  the  United 
Service  Club,  although  he  has  since  resigned  his  membership.  He  belongs  to 
the  Western  and  Canadian  Clubs  and  is  a  member  of  the  Anglican  church.  He  is 
a  conservative  in  his  political  beliefs  and  has  been  active  in  the  work  of  the  local 
party  organization. 

WILLIAM  JOHN  KERR. 

William  John  Kerr  is  essentially  a  British  Columbian,  one  of  the  type  that  has 
in  it  that  crystallized  spirit  of  the  west  which  has  been  such  a  potent  factor  in 
the  rapid  and  stable  development  of  this  great  province.  Endowed  with  a  mag- 
netic personality,  untiring  energy,  sound  judgment,  a  quick  grasp  of  business  af- 
fairs and  an  accurate  judgment  of  men,  Mr.  Kerr  possesses  all  the  qualifications 
necessary  to  conduct  any  legitimate  enterprise  to  a  successful  issue.  He  has  be- 
come one  of  the  foremost  real-estate  men  of  the  province  and  is  equally  well 
known  in  commercial  circles.  In  both  connections  he  has  manifested  a  spirit  of 
enterprise  and  initiative  that  has  long  since  led  him  to  pass  beyond  the  ranks  of 
the  many  and  stand  among  the  successful  few.  Born  in  Heathcote,  Ontario,  on 
May  24,  1877,  to  Robert  and  Mary  Kerr  (nee  Waudby),  W.  J.  Kerr  is  descended 
from  the  early  settlers  of  Ontario,  his  paternal  and  maternal  grandparents  being 
the  pioneers  of  Boulton,  near  Toronto. 

Son  of  a  farmer,  and  himself  a  close  student  of  nature,  Mr.  Kerr  in  his  early 
years  had  exceptional  opportunities  for  acquiring  that  practical  knowledge  of 
agriculture  that  was  to  stand  him  in  such  good  stead  later  in  life,  when  he  had  be- 
come the  directing  head  of  a  large  real-estate  concern  on  the  Pacific  coast.  But, 
like  many  other  sons  of  the  soil,  he  was  not  content  to  remain  on  the  farm,  and 
when  yet  in  his  early  teens  he  set  out  to  see  the  world  and  seek  his  fortune. 

Calgary  was  the  first  city  to  attract  him.  This  was  in  1892,  when  the  Foot- 
hills city  was  still  in  its  infancy  and  retained  much  of  its  wild-west  ways.  From 
Calgary  young  Kerr  went  north  to  Edmonton,  and  then  spending  a  short  time  in 
the  different  towns  in  the  interior,  he  gradually  made  his  way  to  Vancouver,  arriv- 
ing there  in  1897,  on  his  twentieth  birthday. 

At  that  time  Vancouver  was  thronged  with  men  bound  to  the  recently  dis- 
covered gold  fields  of  the  Klondike.  Stories  of  great  fortunes  made — and  lost — 
in  a  day  were  on  every  tongue.  The  lure  of  the  north  proved  irresistible,  and 
from  1898  to  1902  Mr.  Kerr  mushed  and  mined  in  the  frozen  northland.  Fortune 
failed  to  reward  him,  however,  and  he  returned  to  the  coast  richer  only  in  ex- 
perience and  knowledge. 

From  1902  to  1905  Mr.  Kerr  engaged  in  various  commercial  enterprises  in 
Vancouver,  Everett  (Wash.),  Chilliwack  and  other  cities.  In  the  spring  of  1905 
he  opened  a  real-estate  and  auctioneer's  office  in  New  Westminster,  conducting 
the  two  vocations  for  the  next  couple  of  years. 

Real-estate,  however,  soon  required  his  entire  attention,  and  he  laid  aside  the 
auctioneer's  hammer.  He  early  foresaw  the  great  demand  that  was  assured  for 
small  fruit  and  poultry  farms  in  the  Fraser  valley  and  was  one  of  the  first  to  sub- 
divide large  tracts  of  cleared  land  into  five-acre  parcels,  'selling  this  on  long  term 
payments.  His  success  in  successfully  placing  industrious  settlers  on  the  land  has 
been  almost  phenomenal  and  can  be  better  appreciated  when  one  realizes  that  he 
has  had  over  one  hundred  and  fifty  employes  on  his  pay  roll  at  one  time.  His 
branch  offices  are  to  be  found  in  Vancouver,  Coquitlam,  Calgary  and  Winnipeg, 
while  in  eighteen  other  cities  leading  firms  act  as  his  representatives. 

Mr.  Kerr  has  the  reputation  of  being  the  heaviest  individual  advertiser  in 
western  Canada,  and  he  himself  attributes  much  of  his  business  success  to  a  gen- 
erous use  of  printer's  ink.  Early  in  1913  Mr.  Kerr  conceived  the  idea  of  estab- 
lishing a  chain  of  cash  grocery  stores  in  western  Canada,  and  promoted  a  com- 


WILLIAM   J.   KKRR 


BRITISH    COLUMBIA  261 

pany  for  the  purpose  of  operating  such  stores  in  Winnipeg,  Brandon,  Regma, 
Moose  Jaw,  Medicine  Hat,  Calgary,  Edmonton,  Nelson,  Revelstoke,  Kamloops, 
Vernon,  New  Westminster,  Vancouver,  Victoria  and  Nanaimo.  The  Dominion 
Stores,  Limited,  as  the  company  is  known,  is  capitalized  at  a  million  dollars.  Mr. 
Kerr  is  one  of  the  heaviest  investors  in  this  enterprise. 

Outside  of  his  business  activities  Mr.  Kerr  is  best  known  for  his  interest  in 
the  good  roads  movement.  He  was  largely  instrumental  in  forming  the  Cana- 
dian Highways  Association  in  1911  and  was  elected  its  first  president,  an  honor 
which  was  again  conferred  on  him  at  the  second  convention,  held  in  Winnipeg 
in  1912.  As  the  active  head  of  this  organization,  which  had  for  its  patron  His 
Royal  Highness  the  Duke  of  Connaught,  governor-general  of  Canada,  and  a  mem- 
bership extending  from  coast  to  coast,  Mr.  Kerr  is  in  a  position  to  greatly  help 
the  popular  good  roads  movement,  and  he  has  not  failed  to  do  this.  Largely  due 
to  his  assistance,  Canada  was  for  the  first  time  crossed  by  automobile  in  1912, 
the  trip  being  under  the  auspices  of  the  association  of  which  he  is  president. 

Prior  to  the  formation  of  the  Canadian  Highways  Association,  Mr.  Kerr  was 
for  some  years  one  of  the  vice  presidents  of  the  Pacific  Highway  Association,  an 
American-British  Columbia  organization  with  headquarters  in  Seattle.  He  has 
also  held  the  presidency  of  the  New  Westminster  Automobile  Club,  having  been 
active  in  its  formation  and  always  one  of  its  stanchest  supporters.  Prpgressive 
movements  have  always  found  in  him  a  strong  supporter,  and  both  the  New 
Westminster  Board  of  Trade  and  the  New  Westminster  Progressive  Association 
count  him  as  one  of  their  foremost  members. 

Mr.  Kerr  has  never  taken  a  prominent  part  in  the  work  of  any  secret  society, 
although  he  is  a  member  of  the  Elks.  He  is  also  a  member  of  the  Westminster 
Club.  His  marriage  to  Gertrude  Medley,  daughter  of  Mr.  and  Mrs.  William 
Medley,  of  New  Westminster,  took  place  in  that  city  on  October  5,  1905.  He  has 
no  children.  Such  in  brief  is  the  life  history  of  Mr.  Kerr,  whose  business  on  every 
occasion  balances  up  with  the  principles  of  truth  and  honor,  while  his  devotion  to 
the  public  good  is  a  recognized  feature  in  his  career.  He  is  the  strong  center  of 
the  community  in  which  he  moves.  He  is  forceful  and  resourceful  in  real-estate 
and  mercantile  circles,  and  at  the  same  time  his  breadth  of  view  not  only  saw 
possibilities  for  his  own  advancement  but  for  the  development  of  the  province 
and  his  lofty  patriotism  has  prompted  him  to  utilize  the  latter  as  quickly  and  as 
effectively  as  the  former. 


WILLIAM    N.   O'NEIL. 

William  N.  O'Neil  has  built  up  a  business  in  builders'  supplies  that  o'ertops  all 
other  enterprises  of  its  character  in  Vancouver.  The  secret  of  his  success  is  not 
hard  to  find:  it  lies  in  his  energy,  determination,  watchfulness  and  reliability — 
qualities  which  any  might  cultivate  and  which  never  fail  to  win  advancement  and 
deserved  success.  Mr.  O'Neil  is  a  native  of  Brampton,  Ontario,  born  July  23, 
1874,  his  parents  being  John  M.  and  Jane  Elizabeth  (Long)  O'Neil,  the  former  a 
native  of  Ireland  and  the  latter  of  Ontario.  The  father  made  farming  his  life 
work,  and  both  he  and  his  wife  remained  residents  of  Ontario  until  their  life's 
labors  were  ended  in  death. 

In  the  public  schools  of  his  native  province  William  N.  O'Neil  pursued  his 
education,  but  his  opportunities  were  somewhat  limited,  owing  to  the  fact  that 
he  was  early  thrown  upon  his  own  resources,  having  made  his  way  in  the  world 
unaided  from  the  age  of  fourteen  years.  Whatever  success  he  has  achieved  and 
enjoyed  is  the  direct  result  of  his  perseverance  and  capability.  He  continued 
a  resident  of  Toronto  until  the  spring  of  1898,  when  he  came  to  British  Columbia, 
where  he  established  his  present  business  in  the  same  year.  For  fifteen  years 
he  has  now  been  a  dealer  in  builders'  supplies  of  this  city.  He  became  manufac- 
turers' agent  for  a  number  of  articles,  and  from  that  beginning-  gradually  built 


262  BRITISH    COLUMBIA 

up  the  business  until  in  January,  1912,  it  was  incorporated  under  the  name  of 
William  N.  O'Neil  &  Company,  Ltd.,  of  which  he  is  president  and  manager. 
Associated  with  him  in  the  business  are  H.  J.  Wade,  J.  A.  Goode  and  W.  J.  Risk. 
They  also  have  a  subsidiary  company  in  Victoria  and  they  handle  a  full  line  of 
building  materials,  including  hardwood  flooring,  paints,  oils,  grates,  mantels,  tile, 
glazed  brick,  terra  cotta,  etc.,  having  the  finest  assortment  and  display  of  these 
materials  in  the  province  and  probably  in  western  Canada.  The  business  has 
steadily  grown  along  well  defined  lines  in  keeping  with  the  progressive  spirit  of 
commerce,  and  Mr.  O'Neil's  capable  management,  keen  discernment  and  ability 
to  wisely  use  every  opportunity  have  brought  him  his  success. 

On  the  5th  of  July,  1902,  in  Vancouver,  Mr.  O'Neil  was  united  in  marriage 
to  Miss  B.  V.  Riach,  of  Hamilton,  Ontario,  and  they  have  one  child,  Kathleen. 
Mr.  and  Mrs.  O'Neil  are  members  of  the  Chalmers  Presbyterian  church,  and  the 
former  holds  membership  in  the  Commercial,  Progress  and  Vancouver  Auto- 
mobile Clubs.  He  is  also  connected  with  the  Board  of  Trade  and  is  in  hearty 
sympathy  with  its  projects  for  the  improvement  of  the  city.  His  interests  are 
broad  and  varied.  He  looks  at  life  from  the  standpoint  of  a  liberal-minded  man, 
who  takes  cognizance  of  conditions  and  possibilities  and  works  toward  improve- 
ment along  all  the  lines  of  material,  intellectual  and  moral  advancement,  keeping 
ever  in  view  the  points  of  municipal  welfare. 


JOSEPH  WILSON  McCALLUM. 

Joseph  Wilson  McCallum  is  a  representative  business  man  of  New  West- 
minster and  during  the  last  twenty-eight  years  his  work  has  been  effective  in  the 
attainment  of  great  results  in  the  development  of  British  Columbia.  He  has 
resided  in  this  province  since  1883  and  his  energy  and  ability  as  an  organizer  and 
director  have  since  been  in  evidence,  ever  constituting  an  element  in  the  progress 
and  welfare  of  the  northwest.  Mr.  McCallum  is  a  native  of  Nova  Scotia  and 
was  born  July  4,  1854.  He  represents  one  of  the  old  Canadian  families.  His 
parents  were  William  and  Martha  McCallum,  both  of  whom  were  born,  reared, 
educated  and  spent  their  entire  lives  in  Nova  Scotia. 

In  the  acquirement  of  his  early  education  Joseph  W.  McCallum  attended 
the  grammar  schools  of  his  native  city,  and  afterward  prepared  for  a  business 
career  by  taking  a  course  as  a  general  accountant.  At  the  age  of  twenty  he  went 
to  Boston,  Massachusetts,  where  he  engaged  in  the  express  and  drayage  busi- 
ness until  July,  1883,  when  he  was  caught  by  the  lure  of  the  west  and  came  to 
New  Westminster,  British  Columbia.  In  those  days  employment  was  not  of  a 
very  diversified  kind  nor  was  it  possible  for  the  ambitious  young  man  to  wait  for 
a  choice  of  work.  Mr.  McCallum  took  anything  that  offered  that  would  yield 
him  an  honest  living.  He  engaged  as  a  driver  with  H.  Elliot,  one  of  the  pioneers 
of  New  Westminster,  but,  anxious  to  advance,  he  was  awake  to  all  opportunities 
and  utilized  every  means  at  hand  to  promote  his  progress  in  a  business  way.  For 
a  time  he  tried  blacksmithing  under  Walter  Blackie,  and  in  1885 -he  secufed  a 
farm  in  Surrey  which  he  cultivated  and  improved  until  1896.  He  was  then 
attracted  by  the  upper  country  and  with  many  others  entered  upon  the  quest  for 
gold  in  the  mining  regions  of  the  north.  He  prospected  in  the  Kootenay  and 
Boundary  districts  for  six  years  when,  the  fascination  of  the  gold  fields  losing  its 
charm,  he  went  to  Salmon  Arm,  where  he  embarked  in  the  real-estate  business. 
After  locating  there  he  opened  a  general  store  and  as  his  sterling  qualities  became 
known  and  recognized  he  found  his  business  increasing  to  such  proportions  that 
it  was  impossible  to  give  to  the  different  departments  all  the  attention  they 
required,  so  that  he  disposed  of  a  portion  of  the  business.  In  1908  he  sold  out 
altogether  in  Salmon  Arm  and  again  located  on  the  coast.  He  afterward  removed 
to  Abbottsford  and  has  divided  his  time  and  attention  between  Abbottsford  and 
New  Westminster  to  the  present  day.  He  has  a  factory  in  the  east  end  of  the 


JOSEPH  W.  McCALLUM 


BRITISH    COLUMBIA  265 

latter  city  where  he  is  now  engaged  in  making  cement  blocks  and  plastic  floor- 
ing. This  has  become  one  of  the  important  industries  of  the  city  and  in  its  suc- 
cessful control  Mr.  McCallum  is  proving  his  worth  as  a  business  man.  He  has 
been  closely  identified  with  the  development  of  the  Surrey  district.  Public- 
spirited  and  enterprising,  he  has  ever  endeavored  to  advance  the  interests  of 
this  part  of  the  country  and  his  labors  are  effective  and  far-reaching. 

In  1876  occurred  the  marriage  of  Mr.  McCallum  and  Miss  Elizabeth  McDon- 
ald, of  Nova  Scotia,  and  unto  them  have  been  born  four  children :  John,  of  Van- 
couver; Mrs.  Annie  Edson,  of  Vancouver;  Martha,  of  Spokane,  Washington; 
and  Alexander,  of  New  Westminster.  Politically  Mr.  McCallum  is  of  that  inde- 
pendent class  who  give  their  allegiance  to  the  party  or  to  the  measure  which  in 
their  estimation  will  best  promote  the  welfare,  upbuilding  and  progress  of  coun- 
try or  district.  Although  no  longer  a  young  man  he  still  continues  his  interest  in 
athletics,  is  devoted  to  outdoor  sports  and  is  particularly  fond  of  lacrosse,  of 
horse  racing,  boating  and  hunting.  Through  his  activities,  well  directed  and 
honorable,  he  has  gained  the  respect  and  confidence  of  the  citizens  of  every 
community  in  which  he  has  resided. 

Aside  from  business  Mr.  McCallum  has  figured  to  some  extent  in  public 
affairs.  He  served  for  one  term  as  reeve  of  Salmon  Arm  and  three  years  as 
councilman  in  Surrey.  He  is  and  has  been  prominent  in  agricultural  circles  and 
for  several  years  was  a  director  of  the  Westminster  Agricultural  Society.  The 
cause  of  education  has  ever  found  in  him  a  friend  and  while  in  Surrey  he  acted 
as  a  school  trustee.  He  is  an  Odd  Fellow  and  that  he  is  interested  in  the  moral 
progress  of  the  community  is  indicated  by  his  membership  in  the  Young  Men's 
Christian  Association,  in  the  work  of  which  he  takes  an  active  and  helpful  part. 


GEORGE  W.   GILLEY. 

No  word  of  praise  or  eulogy,  no  sentence  of  criticism  can  alter  the  life 
record  of  one  who  has  gone,  but  the  story  truly  told  contains  a  lesson  that  others 
may  learn  and  profit  by.  If  it  be  the  story  of  an  honest  man  whose  natural  gifts 
were  used  for  the  betterment  of  his  home  community,  or  in  a  yet  wider  sphere,  for 
the  benefit  of  his  fellowmen,  it  may  serve  to  encourage  and  inspire  others,  indi- 
cating the  possibilities  that  lie  before  the  individual  and  demonstrating  what  may 
be  accomplished  through  personal  effort  and  ambition  intelligently  directed.  Such 
a  career  was  that  of  George  W.  Gilley  of  New  Westminster  and  for  many  years 
one  of  its  foremost  citzens.  He  aided  in  building  up  this  city  and  contributed  to 
its  importance,  traveling  a  path  of  usefulness  and  honor.  His  start  in  life  was 
but  humble,  so  that  without  any  special  advantages  to  aid  him  at  the  outset  of 
his  career,  he  worked  his  way  upward  by  the  sheer  force  of  his  character  and  a 
natural  ability,  despite  obstacles  and  serious  hindrances.  Born  in  St.  Andrews, 
•New  Brunswick,  on  April  2,  1852,  George  W.  Gilley  was  a  son  of  George  and 
Mary  Gilley,  both  of  St.  Andrews,  where  they  passed  away.  George  Gilley  was  a 
wharf  builder  and  ship  carpenter  and  well  and  favorably  known  in  his  home 
community.  His  son,  our  subject,  was  reared  there,  but  his  education  was  very 
slight.  In  fact  he  received  only  a  few  months  of  schooling  in  all.  However,  he 
was  a  young  man  of  extraordinary  intellect  and  quick  perception  and  learned 
much  by  self-study  and  from  life's  experiences.  When  he  was  only  twenty-one 
years  of  age  he  already  had  charge  of  a  large  force  of  bridge  builders,  and  from 
this  early  age  was  prominent  in  contracting  and  bridge  and  wharf  building.  His 
powers  of  mental  calculation  were  wonderful  and  he  was  able  to  solve  the  most 
complex  problems  in  his  head  and  used  to  employ  that  method  in  giving  figures  on 
the  largest  contracts,  one  of  which  aggregated  to  a  total  of  sixty  thousand  dollars. 
His  absolute  reliability  is  shown  by  the  fact  that  the  difference  between  him  and 
competing  bidders  was  but  one  hundred  and  fifty  dollars  on  this  large  work. 


266  BRITISH    COLUMBIA 

In  May,  1878,  Mr.  Gilley  came  to  British  Columbia,  locating  at  Jericho,  in 
which  city  he  accepted  employment  with  Jerry  Rogers,  doing  carpenter  work. 
Later  he  became  captain  of  the  steam  tug  Maggie,  towing  logs  for  the  Hastings 
mill,  and  after  the  death  of  Mr.  Rogers  in  1879  continued  as  captain  of  the  tug 
in  the  employ  of  the  Hastings  mill  people  for  about  a  year.  After  that  period 
he  came  to  New  Westminster  and  successfully  engaged  in  pile  driving  and 
wharf  building,  having  contracts  for  most  of  the  wharfs  on  the  Fraser  river  in 
those  early  days.  Gradually  his  business  connections  extended  and  he  success- 
fully followed  his  occupation  until  his  death,  which  occurred  on  the  4th  of 
November,  1904.  Not  only  was  he  a  witness  of  the  transformation  that  took 
place  in  New  Westminster  but  an  active  and  cooperatant  factor  in  promoting 
its  advancement  and  his  work  was  a  serviceable  force  in  the  upbuilding  of 
the  city. 

On  August  27,  1873,  Mr.  Gilley  was  united  in  marriage,  at  St.  George,  New 
Brunswick,  to  Miss  Susan  McCormick,  a  native  of  St.  George  and  a  daughter 
of  Joseph  McCormick,  the  latter  born  in  the  north  of  Ireland,  and  Matilda 
(Davis)  McCormick,  a  native  of  the  north  of  England.  The  mother  died  in 
New  Brunswick  in  January,  1887,  but  the  father  is  still  living  there  at  the 
advanced  age  of  eighty-seven  years,  highly  esteemed  and  respected.  He  is  an  old 
veteran  of  the  Fenian  raid.  To  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Gilley  no  children  were  born,  but 
they  adopted  a  daughter,  Eva  B.,  whom  they  reared  to  young  womanhood  and 
who  is  an  inseparable  companion  of  her  mother. 

Mr.  Gilley  was  a  genial,  whole-souled  man,  whose  purse  was  always  open  to 
the  needy,  and  all  who  come  in  contact  with  him  were  his  friends  and  admirers. 
He  was  always  foremost  in  any  movement  for  the  progress  and  advancement  of 
New  Westminster,  glad  to  bear  his  share,  when  called  upon,  to  further  any 
worthy  enterprise.  He  was  a  member  of  the  blue  lodge  of  Masons  and  the 
Independent  Order  of  Odd  Fellows.  Mrs.  Gilley  is  a  member  of  the  Rebekahs, 
and  both  she  and  Miss  Eva  are  members  of  St.  Paul's  Reformed  Episcopal 
church,  in  the  work  of  which  they  take  an  active  and  helpful  interest.  A  man 
of  character  and  achievement,  the  memory  of  Mr.  Gilley  is  reverently  cherished 
not  only  by  his  immediate  family  but  by  many  friends  who  gave  him  their  full 
confidence  on  account  of  his  honorable  and  manly  qualities. 


ERNEST  EBBAGE. 

Ernest  Ebbage,  president  of  Orr  &  Ebbage,  Limited,  was  born  in  Acton,  On- 
tario, April  20,  1876,  his  parents  being  Thomas  and  Anne  (Overton)  Ebbage, 
the  former  a  native  of  Ontario  and  the  latter  of  England.  His  father  was  for 
many  years  engaged  in  the  lumber  business  in  Acton,  where  both  he  and  his  wife 
still  reside,  and  there  the  son  pursued  his  education,  being  a  schoolmate  of  Lewis 
D.  Orr,  who  is  now  his  partner.  At  the  age  of  fourteen  years  he  started  out  in* 
the  business  world  as  an  employe  in  the  office  of  the  Acton  Free  Press,  in  which 
he  learned  the  printing  trade.  In  1897  he  went  to  Butte,  Montana,  and  remained 
in  that  city  and  in  the  interior  of  the  state,  where  he  was  engaged  in  newspaper 
work,  until  1905.  He  then  turned  his  attention  to  the  real-estate  business  in 
Butte,  making  his  initial  effort  in  the  field  in  which  he  is  now  meeting  with  sub- 
stantial success.  He  continued  in  the  business  there  until  1907,  when  he  crossed 
the  border  and  again  became  a  Canadian  resident,  locating  in  Calgary  and  after- 
ward at  Kelowna,  where  he  spent  one  year.  Early  in  1909  he  came  to  Vancouver, 
where  he  has  since  been  engaged  in  the  real-estate  business,  and  in  1912  he  opened 
an  office  in  North  Vancouver.  On  the  ist  of  January,  1913,  he  formed  a  partner- 
ship with  his  schoolmate  and  boyhood  friend,  Lewis  D.  Orr,  under  the  present 
firm  style  of  Orr  &  Ebbage,  Limited,  with  offices  at  No.  508  Dunsmuir  street,  while 
his  North  Vancouver  office  now  serves  as  a  branch  establishment  for  the  company. 
The  friendship  formed  between  the  two  partners  in  their  childhood  days  has 


ERNEST  EBBAGE 


BRITISH    COLUMBIA  269 

grown  and  strengthened  as  the  years  have  passed  by.  They  were  born  within 
eight  miles  of  each  other,  attended  the  Acton  public  school  together,  and  from 
that  time  have  been  the  warmest  of  friends.  They  left  Ontario  about  the  same 
time,  Mr.  Orr  going  to  New  York  city  and  Mr.  Ebbage  to  Montana.  After  being 
apart  for  many  years  and  having  no  idea  as  to  the  whereabouts  of  each  other, 
they  met  one  day,  after  each  had  been  in  Vancouver  but  a  short  time,  in  Mclntyre's 
cafe.  That  was  in  April,  1909.  Both  became  interested  in  the  real-estate  business 
in  this  city  and  decided  to  join  their  interests.  The  present  partnership  was 
formed,  as  previously  stated,  in  January,  1913.  They  now  have  a  large  clientage 
and  the  business  is  growing  so  that  they  have  won  a  place  among  the  leading 
real-estate  men  of  the  city. 

In  Butte,  Montana,  Mr.  Ebbage  was  married  to  Miss  Pearle  L.  Eaton,  of  Des 
Moines,  Iowa,  a  daughter  of  Harrison  A.  Eaton,  a  lumber  merchant  and  pioneer 
of  that  city.  The  three  children  of  this  marriage  are  Elizabeth,  Ernestine  and 
Raymund.  Mr.  Ebbage  is  a  member  of  the  Terminal  City  Club,  British  Columbia 
Golf  and  Country  Club,  and  during  his  residence  in  Vancouver  has  won  a  wide 
circle  of  friends.  Both  partners  are  enterprising  young  business  men,  watchful 
of  opportunity,  active  and  determined  in  meeting  and  overcoming  obstacles,  and 
with  resolute  spirit  working  their  way  steadily  upward  to  success. 


EDWARD  JULIUS  FALCH. 

Edward  Julius  Falch  occupies  an  important  position  in  New  Westminster  as 
proprietor  of  the  Royal  City  Hotel,  which  establishment  he  has  conducted  for 
about  fourteen  years.  After  an  interesting  career,  in  many  respects  stranger  than 
fiction,  he  settled  in  New  Westminster  and  has  here  attained  a  success  which 
ranks  him  with  the  substantial  men  of  his  community.  His  material  attainments 
are  the  more  commendable  as  they  have  been  achieved  entirely  through  his  own 
efforts  and  in  such  a  way  as  to  cast  not  the  slightest  shadow  of  wrong  upon  his 
record.  He  was  born  in  Norway  on  January  27,  1872,  a  son  of  Edward  and  Julia 
(Neerland)  Falch,  natives  of  the  Norse  kingdom,  where  the  father  died  in  1889 
and  the  mother  still  makes  her  home. 

Edward  J.  Falch  remained  in  his  native  country  until  he  had  passed  his  four- 
teenth birthday,  acquiring  his  education  largely  under  private  instruction  from  his 
father,  who  was  a  man  of  learning  and  who  during  his  lifetime  held  a  number  of 
important  government  posts.  In  1886  Edward  J.  Falch  set  out  for  himself  with 
the  desire  to  see  the  world  and  to  find  his  opportunity.  Leaving  Norway,  he  went 
to  South  Shields-on-Tyne,  England,  whence  he  shipped  before  the  mast  as  a  sea- 
man on  a  coast-going  vessel  plying  along  the  English  and  French  coast  and 
through  the  Mediterranean  to  the  Holy  Land.  On  that  occasion  he  visited  Jeru- 
salem. He  subsequently  sailed  to  Glasgow,  thence  to  Liverpool  and  from  there 
to  Ireland.  About  1888  he  shipped  aboard  the  sailing  vessel  Albion  at  Liverpool 
for  Portland,  the  voyage  consuming  one  hundred  and  seventy-two  days.  Landing 
Portland,  he  left  the  ship  and  proceeded  to  Tillamook  bay,  where  he  was  em- 
ployed for  some  time  at  pile  driving,  but  later  returned  to  Portland.  There  he 
remained  but  a  short  time,  however,  then  making  his  way  northward  to  Seattle, 
coming  a  fortnight  later  to  British  Columbia.  Finding  employment  in  Vancouver 
at  cutting  shingles,  he  was  so  engaged  in  1890  in  a  location  which  is  now  the  end 
of  Hastings  street.  At  that  time  he  cut  a  cedar  tree  on  East  Hastings  which 
measured  eleven  feet  across  and  it  took  him  four  days  to  bring  down  the  tree. 
It  furnished  twenty-eight  cords  of  shingle  bolts,  which  statement  will  give  an  idea 
of  the  enormous  size  of  the  forest  trees.  That  winter  he  spent  in  the  timber  land 
and  in  the  following  spring  went  to  Steveston,  purchasing  an  outfit  for  salmon 
fishing,  but  typhoid  fever  overtook  him  and  prevented  the  conclusion  of  his  affairs. 
He  was  ill  during  the  greater  part  of  the  summer.  What  money  he  had  saved  was 
used  for  medical  attention  and  when  he  was  ready  to  engage  in  work  again  his 


270  BRITISH    COLUMBIA 

funds  were  reduced  to  a  minimum.  However,  he  held  to  his  purpose  and  en- 
gaged in  fishing,  continuing  in  that  business  successfully  for  ten  years,  or  until 
the  Japanese  became  so  numerous  that  the  business  turned  out  to  be  unprofitable. 
During  this  time  Mr.  Falch  sold  one  spring's  catch  for  more  than  four  thousand 
dollars,  receiving  between  one  and  one-quarter  and  one  and  one-half  cents  per 
pound.  He  also  caught  many  large  sturgeon,  one  of  which  tipped  the  scales  at  the 
remarkable  weight  of  eight  hundred  and  sixty-four  pounds.  In  1901  Mr.  Falch 
came  to  New  Westminster  and,  perceiving  an  opportunity  to  establish  an  up-to- 
date  hotel,  built  the  present  Royal  City  Hotel,  which  he  has  made  one  of  the  most 
popular  of  the  city.  It  is  modern  and  equipped  with  all  the  conveniences  of  the 
day,  its  clientage  being  representative  and  of  a  high  class.  Mr.  Falch  is  a  born 
host,  a  genial  entertainer  and  never  fails  to  give  the  closest  attention  to  even  the 
smallest  detail  of  his  business  to  assure  his  guests  of  the  greatest  comforts. 

In  1903  Mr.  Falch  was  united  in  marriage  to  Miss  Maud  Batt,  by  whom  he 
had  two  children.  His  wife  and  children  have  since  passed  away.  In  May,  1908, 
he  married  Miss  Annie  Lawrence,  of  Dundee,  Scotland,  and  to  them  were  born 
two  daughters,  Edna  Annie  Hendricka  and  Margaret  Julia.  Fraternally  Mr. 
Falch  is  connected  with  the  Eagles.  He  is  an  enthusiastic  sportsman  and  said  to 
be  the  best  informed  man  in  British  Columbia  as  regards  waterways  and  the 
haunts  of  game.  Every  year  in  November  he  spends  the  entire  month  in  hunting 
and  fishing,  taking  with  him  from  six  to  twelve  friends  who  are  his  guests  on  the 
trip.  His  hunting  scow  is  fitted  with  all  conveniences  and  it  is  needless  to  say  that 
he  makes  these  trips  memorable  to  those  who  are  his  guests.  Everything  that  can 
contribute  to  their  well-being  is  provided  and  he  always  hires  one  of  the  best  cooks 
obtainable  to  prepare  the  meals  of  the  party.  For  weeks  tramps  are  made  to  the 
wildest  parts  of  the  mountain  fastnesses  and  many  times  they  travel  with  their 
packs  on  their  backs  and  guns  in  hand,  passing  through  the  finest  and  most  won- 
derful scenery  in  the  world.  Although  public-spirited  and  progressive,  Mr.  Falch 
has  never  cared  to  actively  participate  in  the  public  life  of  his  city,  although  he 
takes  a  deep  interest  in  all  worthy  enterprises  affecting  the  welfare  of  the  public. 
By  his  activities  he  has  largely  promoted  growth  and  expansion  and,  while  he  has 
attained  personal  prosperity,  has  been  a  serviceable  factor  in  bringing  about  the 
prosperous  conditions  that  now  prevail  in  New  Westminster. 


JAMES  BEVERIDGE. 

Prominent  among  the  enterprising,  progressive  and  representative  business 
men  of  Vancouver  is  James  Beveridge,  who  is  conducting  an  extensive,  growing 
and  profitable  business  as  an  importer  of  teas,  coffees  and  spices  under  the  name 
of  William  Braid  &  Company.  Step  by  step  he  has  worked  his  way  upward  in 
commercial  circles,  being  dependent  upon  his  own  resources  from  the  age  of 
sixteen  years  and  achieving  his  success  by  reason  of  close  application,  capable 
management  and  honorable  dealing.  Today  the  business  is  one  of  notable  mag- 
nitude, having  been  carefully  developed  along  progressive  lines,  its  growth  being 
due  also  to  the  fine  quality  of  the  goods  carried. 

Mr.  Beveridge  was  born  in  Murton,  Northumberland,  England,  December  8, 
1856,  a  son  of  William  and  Hannah  (Hogg)  Beveridge,  the  former  a  farmer  of 
Northumberland.  Until  sixteen  years  of  age  James  Beveridge  remained  upon 
his  father's  farm  and  during  that  period  acquired  his  education  in  Davidson's 
parish  school  at  Thornton.  He  then  went  to  Newcastle-on-Tyne,  where  he 
made  his  initial  step  in  the  business  world  in  connection  with  the  grocery  trade. 
After  serving  his  apprenticeship  in  an  establishment  of  that  character  he  con- 
tinued as  an  employe  in  the  retail  trade  until  he  became  traveling  salesman  for 
the  importing  house  of  James  Gall  &  Company,  of  Glasgow,  with  whom  he 
remained  until  1891,  when  he  resigned  and  went  to  San  Francisco,  California. 
He  then  became  traveling  salesman  for  the  importing  and  manufacturing  firm 


JAMES   BEVERIDGE 


BRITISH    COLUMBIA  273 

of  A.  Schilling  &  Company  of  that  city  but  after  two  years  came  to  British 
Columbia  in  1894  as  traveling  representative  for  the  same  firm  with  headquarters 
in  Victoria,  covering  the  territory  of  British  Columbia.  He  remained  with  the 
firm  of  A.  Schilling  &  Company  until  1895,  when  they  wished  him  to  return  to  the 
United  States,  but  preferring  to  reside  on  this  side  of  the  border  he  resigned  his 
position.  In  that  year  he  became  associated  with  the  wholesale  tea,  colfee  and 
spice  house  of  William  Braid  &  Company,  of  Vancouver,  acting  as  their  travel- 
ing representative  in  British  Columbia  for  a  decade  or  until  1904,  when  he 
became  a  partner  in  the  business.  After  that  time  he  only  went  upon  the  road 
for  an  occasional  trip.  As  a  commercial  salesman  he  was  one  of  the  best  and 
most  successful  in  the  business,  was  thoroughly  acquainted  with  the  trade,  and 
his  energy,  enterprise  and  diligence,  combined  with  an  agreeable  manner  and 
geniality,  made  him  popular  with  those  with  whom  he  had  dealings  and  con- 
tributed much  to  the  success  of  the  house  which  he  represented.  After  pur- 
chasing an  interest  in  the  firm  of  William  Braid  &  Company  he  bent  his  energies 
to  administrative  direction  and  executive  control  of  the  business  in  Vancouver, 
introduced  enterprising  methods,  kept  in  touch  with  the  trend  of  commercial 
activity  and  by  careful  management  developed  the  trade  to  large  proportions. 
In  January,  1912,  he  purchased  the  interests  of  Mr.  William  Braid  in  the  busi- 
ness and  is  now  sole  proprietor.  Since  starting  out  on  his  own  account  he  has 
made  continuous  progress,  never  fearing  to  venture  where  favoring  opportunity 
led  the  way  and  making  the  most  of  each  advantage  as  it  has  arisen.  The  under- 
taking of  which  he  is  now  sole  proprietor  is  one  of  the  largest  and  most  promi- 
nent in  this  line  in  western  Canada.  Its  territory  covers  the  provinces  of  British 
Columbia,  Alberta  and  Saskatchewan  and  Yukon  territory,  and  its  importation 
and  sales  have  reached  mammoth  proportions.  Mr.  Beveridge  is  himself  an 
expert  in  judging  teas  and  coffees.  The  special  brands  of  the  house  are  Braid's 
Best  tea,  Braid's  Best  coffee  and  Big  Four  coffee.  An  extensive  business  in  the 
manufacture  of  extracts  is  also  carried  on,  all  of  the  products  being  scientifically 
and  carefully  prepared,  the  latest  improved  processes,  methods  and  machinery 
being  used.  The  genuine  bourbon  vanilla  bean  is  imported  and  their  vanilla 
extract  is  percolated  in  barrels,  it  requiring  from  three  to  five  months  to  mature. 
The  lemon  extract  is  also  carefully  filtered  and  all  of  the  processes  used  are  of 
the  most  improved  and  thoroughly  modern  kind.  The  building  occupied  by  the 
business  is  six  stories  in  height  and  contains  over  fifty  thousand  square  feet  in 
floor  space.  They  carry  the  largest  stock  of  coffee  in  Canada  and  keep  in  stock 
a  sufficient  amount  to  make  fifty  million  cups  of  coffee.  Their  annual  trade 
amounts  to  eleven  hundred  tons  of  coffee  and  their  roasting  capacity  is  one 
thousand  pounds  every  half  an  hour.  This  indicates,  at  least  in  part,  something 
of  the  nature  and  extent  of  the  business  which  under  the  careful  direction  and 
guidance  of  Mr.  Beveridge  has  been  built  up  to  its  present  mammoth  and  grati- 
fying proportions,  showing  Mr.  Beveridge  to  be  a  man  of  splendid  business 
ability.  He  certainly  deserves  much  credit  for  what  he  has  accomplished  and 
his  example  should  serve  to  inspire  and  stimulate  others  to  follow  the  same  hon- 
orable course  that  he  has  pursued. 

In  1884  Mr.  Beveridge  was  united  in  marriage  to  Miss  Elizabeth  Agnes  Lis- 
ter, a  daughter  of  George  L.  Lister,  a  carpenter  and  building  contractor  of  Dur- 
ham county,  England.  Their  children  are  George  Lister,  William  Wentworth, 
Helen  Maud,  John  Sydney  and  Minnie.  Mr.  Beveridge  holds  membership  in 
the  Ancient  Order  of  United  Workmen.  He  is  also  a  member  of  the  Vancouver 
Board  of  Trade  and  cooperates  heartily  in  its  various  projects  for  the  growth 
and  development  of  the 'city.  In  fact  he  has  taken  an  active  and  helpful  part  in 
many  movements  for  the  benefit  of  Vancouver  and  British  Columbia  and  his 
public-spirited  citizenship  is  never  called  into  question.  He  votes  with  the  liberal 
party  but  has  never  been  very  active  in  politics,  preferring  that  his  labors  should 
be  directed  along  other  lines.  He  is  a  man  of  broad  humanitarian  principles  and 
his  spirit  of  benevolence  has  found  tangible  evidence  many  times.  He  is  chair- 
man of  the  board  of  managers  of  Westminster  Hall  and  at  one  time  was  presi- 


274  BRITISH    COLUMBIA 

dent  of  the  Sailors  and  Loggers  Society.  He  was  also  the  first  president  of  the 
Young  Men's  Christian  Association.  He  is  a  devout  member  and  elder. of  the 
Kitsalano  Presbyterian  church  and  president  of  the  Presbyterian  brotherhood, 
while  he  is  also  a  member  of  the  Presbytery  and  Synod  of  British  Columbia. 
No  good  work  done  in  the  name  of  charity  or  religion  seeks  his  aid  in  vain. 
His  philanthropy  and  his  Christianity  are  as  large  a  part  of  his  daily  life  as  is  his 
business.  He  stands  today  as  a  representative  of  the  merchant  to  whom  com- 
mercial interests  are  but  one  phase  of  life  and  do  not  exclude  his  active  partici- 
pation in  and  support  of  the  other  vital  interests  which  go  to  make  up  human 
existence. 


DAVID  GIBB. 

David  Gibb,  now  living  retired,  was  for  an  extended  period  accounted  one  of 
the  most  prominent  contractors  of  Vancouver  and  British  Columbia.  Early  in 
his  career  he  recognized  the  eternal  truth  that  industry  wins  and  industry  became 
the  beacon  light  of  his  life.  He  was  born  May  15,  1852,  in  Auchinleck,  Ayrshire, 
near  to  the  birthplace  of  the  poet  Burns.  His  parents  were  John  and  Agnes 
Gibb,  the  former  a  contractor  of  Scotland,  and  both  parents  died  in  the  land  of 
hills  and  heather. 

In  the  common  schools  David  Gibb  pursued  his  education,  but  at  an  early 
age  put  aside  his  text-books  because  of  the  necessity  of  providing  for  his  own 
support.  He  started  out  in  business  life  as  a  laborer  on  a  farm  in  Scotland, 
but  was  afterward  apprenticed  to  the  stone-cutting  trade  and  subsequently 
became  a  journeyman  in  that  line  of  labor.  At  length  in  1872  he  left  Scotland 
for  the  United  States  and  became  a  resident  of  Chicago  soon  after  the  great  fire 
which  swept  away  much  of  that  city.  He  was  then  about  twenty  years  of  age. 
He  remained  for  nearly  a  year  in  Chicago,  working  at  his  trade,  after  which  he 
returned  to  his  native  land  and  was  married  in  Scotland  to  Miss  Sarah  Mathieson, 
a  daughter  of  William  and  Sarah  Mathieson,  the  former  a  contractor  of  New 
Cumnock,  Scotland.  The  marriage  was  celebrated  on  the  2/th  of  December,  1872. 

After  the  failure  of  the  Glasgow  Bank  Mr.  Gibb  returned  to  the  United  States 
and  worked  at  his  trade  in  New  York.  In  1885,  attracted  by  the  lure  of  the  north- 
west, he  made  his  way  to  Lethbridge,  Alberta,  Canada,  where  he  began  contract- 
ing on  his  own  account,  erecting  several  of  the  business  blocks  there.  Still  the 
call  of  the  west  sounded  in  his  ears  and  resuming  his  journey  he  traveled  to  the 
coast,  arriving  in  Vancouver  in  1888.  From  the  beginning  of  his  residence  here 
he  has  occupied  a  prominent  position  among  the  leading  contractors  in  Vancouver. 
His  first  work  here  was  for  A.  G.  Ferguson.  Among  the  notable  buildings  for 
which  he  cut  the  stone  are  the  old  post  office,  the  Northern  Crown  Bank,  the 
high  school,  several  of  the  grade  schools,  the  Henry  Birks  building,  the  St.  John's 
church  and  the  Dunsmuir  Hotel.  In  fact  he  has  been  contractor  for  a  large 
percentage  of  the  public  buildings  of  the  city,  and  he  is  now  the  owner  and  pro- 
prietor of  the  Dunsmuir  Hotel.  He  did  not  court  success  in  vain;  on  the  contrary 
fortune  smiled  upon  him  and  he  won  a  place  among  the  prosperous  and  highly 
respected  business  men  of  the  city. 

About  1908  Mr.  Gibb  was  called  upon  to  mourn  the  loss  of  his  first  wife. 
Unto  them  had  been  born  three  daughters  and  a  son :  Sarah,  now  the  wife  of  L. 
Benham,  of  Seattle;  Agnes,  the  wife  of  N.  C.  Wheeling,  of  Vancouver;  Jennie, 
the  wife  of  N.  C.  Kydd,  of  Vancouver;  and  John  W.,  who  married  Miss  Cruick- 
shanks,  of  Vancouver.  For  his  second  wife  Mr.  Gibb  chose  Miss  Lilly  Megrath, 
a  daughter  of  John  and  Elizabeth  Megrath,  the  former  a  contractor  of  Seattle. 
There  is  one  child  of  this  marriage,  Mary  Elizabeth.  The  family  residence, 
which  is  an  attractive  one,  is  at  No.  305  Eleventh  avenue,  West.  The  family 
attend  the  Presbyterian  church  and  in  politics  Mr.  Gibb  is  a  liberal.  He  finds 
pleasure  and  recreation  in  motoring,  and  the  business  position  to  which  he  has 


DAVID  GIBB 


BRITISH    COLUMBIA  277 

attained  now  leaves  him  more  leisure  for  those  things  which  are  a  matter  of 
interest  and  enjoyment  to  him.  Diligence  and  determination  gained  him  a  promi- 
nence in  building  and  financial  circles,  and  while  he  was  promoting  his  individual 
interests  he  also  contributed  in  large  measure  to  the  progress  and  prosperity  of 
Vancouver  and  this  part  of  the  province,  manifesting  at  all  times  a  public-spirited 
citizenship. 

JOSEPH    FREDERICK   NOBLE. 

Joseph  Frederick  Noble  is  a  member  of  the  firm  of  Mather  &  Noble,  Ltd., 
conducting  business  as  general  financial  agents  and  real-estate  and  stock  brokers. 
With  a  nature  that  could  never  be  content  with  mediocrity,  he  has  ever  fared 
forth,  never  neglecting  opportunities  and  utilizing  the  advantages  which  have 
been  his  for  the  achievement  of  honorable  success  and  the  attainment  of  prom- 
inence in  his  chosen  field.  He  has  lived  in  Vancouver  since  1903,  and  is  of 
Canadian  birth,  the  place  of  his  nativity  being  Brampton,  Ontario,  and  the  date 
March  18,  1879.  H*3  parents  were  Thomas  and  Janet  (Aitkman)  Noble.  He 
passed  through  consecutive  grades  in  the  grammar  schools  of  Brampton,  attended 
the  high  school  there,  and  later  took  up  the  profession  of  teaching,  which  he  fol- 
lowed for  three  years.  He  then  engaged  in  the  advertising  business  in  Toronto, 
and  in  1903  arrived  in  Vancouver,  where  he  continued  in  the  same  field  of 
activity  under  the  name  of  the  Noble  Advertising  Agency,  Ltd.  In  this  con- 
nection he  conducted  an  extensive  business.  In  1907,  in  association  with  R.  A. 
Mather,  he  formed  the  firm  of  Mather  &  Noble,  Ltd.,  of  which  he  became  vice 
president,  and  so  continues  to  the  present  time.  In  1909  he  disposed  of  his  adver- 
tising business  to  devote  his  entire  attention  to  the  interests  of  the  present 
company.  They  are  general  financial  agents  and  real-estate  and  stock  brokers,, 
and  their  standing  in  this  field  is  among  the  most  prominent.  Knowledge  of 
every  phase  of  the  business,  knowledge  that  is  comprehensive  and  exact,  forms 
the  basis  of  their  success,  and  added  thereto  is  notable  energy,  diligence  and 
perseverance.  At  various  times  and  including  the  present  Mr.  Noble  has  been 
connected  with  other  financial  and  commercial  enterprises. 

In  1903  occurred  the  marriage  of  Mr.  Noble  and  Miss  Annie  Maude  Large,  a 
daughter  of  A.  Large,  who  for  thirty-seven  years  was  postmaster  at  Poole, 
Ontario.  They  have  one  child,  a  son.  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Noble  hold  membership 
in  the  Methodist  church  and  he  exercises  the  right  of  franchise'  in  support  of 
men  and  measures  of  the  conservative  party. 


JOHN   DEASE   BELL. 

John  Dease  Bell  represents  the  firm  of  Pemberton  &  Son  as  manager  of  the 
Vancouver  branch  of  their  business.  The  company  is  well  known  as  general 
financial  agents,  specializing  in  first  mortgage  loans,  and  in  this  connection  Mr. 
Bell  has  become  well  known  in  the  financial  circles  of  his  adopted  city.  He  is  of 
Canadian  birth,  a  native  of  Sault  Ste.  Marie,  Ontario,  born  December  8,  1877. 
The  name  Dease  was  given  him  in  honor  of  Peter  Warren  Dease,  the  Arctic 
explorer,  who  was  his  great-grandfather.  His  parents  were  Peter  Warren  Went- 
worth  and  Ellen  Sarah  (Dupont)  Bell.  The  father  was  for  forty-seven  years 
in  the  employ  of  the  Hudson's  Bay  Company,  entering  its  service  as  a  boy  with 
Lord  Strathcona,  at  which  time  they  were  stationed  at  Ungava  Bay  on  the 
Labrador  coast.  Gradually  he  advanced  in  that  connection  until  he  became 
chief  factor  and  inspector,  thus  becoming  one  of  the  prominent  representatives 
of  the  company. 


278  BRITISH    COLUMBIA 

John  D.  Bell  was  educated  at  Trinity  College  School  at  Port  Hope,  Ontario, 
a  preparatory  school,  and  when  he  made  his  initial  step  in  the  business  world 
became  an  employe  of  the  Canadian  Bank  of  Commerce,  remaining  with  that 
institution  for  about  fifteen  years.  He  was  employed  by  them  at  different 
places  and  in  various  capacities,  remaining  with  the  bank  until  February,  1908, 
when  he  took  charge  of  the  Vancouver  branch  for  the  firm  of  Pemberton  &  Son, 
and  still  remains  in  this  connection.  While  the  firm  conducts  business  as  general 
financial  agents,  they  have  specialized  in  first  mortage  loans.  His  activities  in 
this  direction  have  made  Mr.  Bell  well  known  in  the  business  circles  of  the  city 
and  his  contemporaries  and  colleagues  have  found  him  resourceful,  energetic, 
capable  and  enterprising.  He  is  also  widely  known  as  president  of  the  Ardley 
Land  Company,  Limited,  of  Vancouver. 

On  the  i8th  of  September,  1905,  at  Dawson  City,  Yukon,  Mr.  Bell  was 
united  in  marriage  to  Miss  Elsie  MacFarlane,  a  daughter  of  Roderick  and  Mary 
MacFarlane.  Her  father  was  with  the  Hudson's  Bay  Company  for  more  than 
forty  years  and  is  the  author  of  a  most  interesting  volume,  entitled  "Through 
the  Mackenzie  Basin."  In  his  politcal  connections  Mr.  Bell  is  a  conservative, 
while  his  social  relations  are  with  the  Western  Club  of  Vancouver.  He  is  well 
known  in  the  city,  where  he  has  gained  an  extensive  circle  of  warm  friends. 


CHARLES  ROBERT  DRAYTON. 

Charles  Robert  Drayton,  recognized  as  one  of  the  foremost  authorities  on  val- 
ues in  British  Columbia,  there  being  no  better  informed  man  on  the  subject  in  the 
province,  is  managing  director  of  the  Vancouver  Financial  Corporation,  Ltd.,  of 
which  he  is  also  one  of  the  founders.  He  was  born  in  Barbados,  West  Indies, 
July  10,  1872,  a  son  of  Philip  Henry  Drayton,  K.  C.,  and  Margaret  (Covernton) 
Drayton.  The  father  was  an  officer  of  the  English  army  but  resigned  his  com- 
mission in  1874  and  came  to  Canada,  settling  in  Toronto,  where  he  took  up  the 
practice  of  law  and  so  continues  to  the  present  time.  He  is  a  king's  counsel,  is  very 
prominent  in  the  profession  and  is  official  arbitrator  for  the  city  of  Toronto.  H.  L. 
Drayton,  K.  C.,  a  brother  of  C.  R.  Drayton,  is  the  present  chairman  of  the  Gov- 
ernment Railway  Managing  Board. 

Charles  R.  Drayton  supplemented  his  preliminary  education,  acquired  in  pri- 
vate schools  of  England,  by  study  in  the  Upper  Canada  College  at  Toronto,  and 
later  entered  the  employ  of  what  afterward  became  the  Canadian  Permanent  Loan 
Company  of  Toronto  in  the  capacity  of  office  boy.  His  rise  with  that  corporation 
was  rapid.  He  was  advanced  through  intermediate  positions  until  he  eventually 
became  western  inspector  and  so  continued  for  twenty  years,  his  position  being 
one  of  large  responsibility  and  importance.  This  work  carried  him  into  all  parts 
of  western  Canada  and  familiarized  him  with  values  in  all  sections  of  the  country. 
The  work  involved  rough  and  arduous  experiences  at  times,  as  in  the  early  days 
transportation  was  primative.  While  the  main  lines  of  the  railroad  had  been  built 
the  work  necessitated  driving  in  a  buggy  almost  every  foot  of  the  country  from 
Toronto  to  the  Pacific  coast.  His  duties  at  length  brought  him  to  Vancouver  in 
1904,  since  which  time  he  has  been  a  resident  of  this  city.  He  continued  with  the 
Canadian  Permanent  Loan  Company  until  1908,  when  desiring  that  his  labors 
should  more  directly  benefit  himself  he  resigned  his  position  and  joined  E.  J. 
Enthoven  in  organizing  the  Vancouver  Financial  Corporation,  Ltd.,  of  which  he 
became  managing  director  and  so  continues.  This  has  become  one  of  the  strong 
moneyed  institutions  of  the  province,  and  its  unassailable  reputation  and  large 
business  interests  are  the  direct  result  of  the  enterprise,  business  management  and 
well  formulated  plans  of  Mr.  Drayton  and  his  partner.  The  beginning  of  the 
business  was  small.  A  little  room  was  secured  and  the  company  started  to  estab- 
lish a  clientage.  Their  worth  as  factors  in  financial  circles  soon  became  recognized, 
the  number  of  their  clients  increased,  and  today  a  large  volume  of  business  is 


CHARLES  R.  DRAYTON 


BRITISH    COLUMBIA  281 

transacted  in  well  appointed  offices  in  the  London  building.  The  officers  of  the 
company  are:  H.  Abbott,  chairman;  C.  R.  Drayton,  managing  director;  and  E.  J. 
Enthoven,  secretary-treasurer.  Only  five  years  have  passed  since  the  organization 
of  the  Vancouver  Financial  Corporation,  Ltd.,  yet  it  is  capitalized  today  for  two 
hundred  and  ten  thousand  dollars  and  has  a  reserve  of  two  hundred  thousand 
dollars.  Their  connections  in  Scotland  are  extensive  and  they  are  represented 
by  agents  in  both  Glasgow  and  Edinburgh.  They  conduct  a  general  financial 
brokerage  business  and  have  invested  large  sums  for  clients.  They  never  enter 
upon  unwarranted  risks,  their  progressiveness  being  tempered  by  a  safe  conserva- 
tism, yet  their  progress  is  never  blocked  by  undue  fear  or  faltering.  The  company 
also  manages  several  large  business  and  office  buildings  in  Vancouver  and  con- 
ducts an  extensive  fire  and  casualty  insurance  business,  being  general  agents  for 
the  General  Fire  Insurance  Company  of  Perth,  Scotland;  the  Aetna  Insurance 
Company,  of  Hartford,  Connecticut ;  the  General  Accident  Insurance  Company, 
of  Toronto;  and  the  Canadian  Casualty  Boiler  Insurance  Company.  A  valuable 
asset  in  the  management  and  control  of  the  business  has  been  Mr.  Drayton's 
broad  and  accurate  knowledge  of  values,  acquired  in  his  long  experience  as  in- 
spector of  the  Canadian  Permanent  Loan  Company.  Through  this  knowledge 
the  money  of  clients  has  been  wisely  and  safely  invested  and  benefit  has  accrued 
to  clients  and  their  financial  agents.  Mr.  Drayton  is  recognized  as  one  of  the 
foremost  authorities  on  values  in  British  Columbia,  there  being  no  better  in- 
formed man  in  that  line  in  the  province.  He  makes  this  his  especial  feature  of 
the  business  and  is  now  valuator  for  six  leading  life  insurance  companies  of  Can- 
ada and  is  often  called  upon  to  act  for  the  city  of  Vancouver  on  arbitrations  in 
valuations.  Mr.  Drayton  also  has  other  financial  interests,  being  a  director  of  W. 
M.  Harrison  &  Company,  Ltd.,  operating  a  chain  of  drug  stores  in  Vancouver, 
and  chairman  of  the  Utrecht  Canadian  Investment  Company,  Ltd.,  of  Vancouver. 
In  politics  Mr.  Drayton  is  independent.  He  belongs  to  the  Vancouver  Club 
and  to  the  Anglican  church,  and  is  interested  in  other  important  features  of  life 
working  for  the  bettering  of  the  individual  or  the  community.  On  the  i8th  of 
June,  1900,  at  Toronto,  he  married  Lydia  Howland,  a  daughter  of  the  late  H.  S. 
Howland,  president  of  the  Imperial  Bank  of  Canada,  and  their  children  are  Henry 
Howland  and  Charles  Hampden.  While  Mr.  Drayton  has  attained  a  most  enviable 
position  in  financial  circles,  the  course  that  he  has  pursued  is  one  which  will  bear 
close  investigation  and  scrutiny.  There  are  no  esoteric  chapters  in  his  life  his- 
tory. Diligence,  determination  and  sound  judgment  have  been  the  salient  factors 
in  his  career,  making  his  an  honored  name  in  financial  circles. 


WILLIAM   JUKES   MARSHALL. 

William  Jukes  Marshall,  senior  partner  in  the  firm  of  Marshall,  Plummer  & 
Company,  civil  engineers  and  contractors,  entered  into  this  relation  in  1911,  and 
in  the  intervening  period  of  two  years  has  built  up  a  business  of  large  and 
gratifying  proportions.  He  was  born  at  St.  Catharines,  Ontario,  February  28, 
1880,  and  is  a  son  of  Paul  Harry  and  Susan  Ann  (Jukes)  Marshall.  In  the 
maternal  line  he  comes  of  a  United  Empire  Loyalist  family  prominent  in 
Canadian  history.  In  1891  the  parents  removed  westward  to  British  Columbia, 
settling  in  Victoria,  where  William  J.  Marshall  pursued  his  education  for  a  time 
in  public  schools  and  also  attended  school  at  Nanaimo.  When  his  text-books  were 
put  aside  he  came  to  Vancouver  and  was  afterward  employed  in  various  capacities 
until  1908,  when  he  became  connected  with  the  contracting  business  as  an  employe 
of  T.  R.  Nickson  &  Company,  with  whom  he  continued  until  1911,  when  he 
entered  into  partnership  with  A.  A.  Plummer  under  the  style  of  Marshall, 
Plummer  &  Company.  This  firm  is  today  a  prominent  one,  having  a  large 
clientage  in  both  civil  engineering  and  contracting.  Thorough  training  and 
broad  experience  have  qualified  these  men  for  the  conduct  of  the  important 

Vol.  Ill—Id 


282  BRITISH    COLUMBIA 

interests  entrusted  to  them  and  in  which  connection  they  are  winning  substantial 
success.  They  are  now  clearing  up  one  hundred  and  thirty  acres  for  the 
provincial  government  just  outside  of  the  city  limits  and  are  at  present  dyking 
Nicomen  island  in  the  Fraser  river,  about  a  ninety  thousand  dollar  job.  They 
have  done  macadamizing  at  Port  Grey  and  steam  shovel  excavation  work  and 
concrete  work  for  schools  and  other  public  buildings. 

On  the  loth  of  October,  1911,  in  Vancouver,  Mr.  Marshall  was  united  in 
marriage  to  Miss  Sarah  Davis,  a  daughter  of  the  Rev.  John  Hardwick  and 
Florence  Davis.  Her  father  was  connected  with  several  parishes  in  England, 
and  in  the  early  days  of  the  settlement  of  the  northwest  made  his  way  to 
Victoria,  where  he  officiated  at  the  Victoria  cathedral.  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Marshall 
are  also  of  the  Anglican  faith.  The  former  was  at  one  time  identified  with  the 
Independent  Order  of  Odd  Fellows,  but  is  not  affiliated  therewith  at  this 
writing.  His  political  allegiance  is  given  to  the  conservative  party,  and  as  a 
member  of  the  Vancouver  Board  of  Trade  he  cooperates  in  many  of  its  plans 
and  projects  for  the  public  good. 


CHARLES  HUBERT  WATSON. 

Musical  circles  of  New  Westminster  and  indeed  all'  circles  in  a  city  where 
ability  is  respected  and  integrity  honored  suffered  a  distinct  loss  in  the  death  of 
Charles  Hubert  Watson,  for  three  years  leader  of  the  city  band  and  organist  and 
choirmaster  of  St.  Andrew's  Presbyterian  church.  At  the  time  of  his  death,  which 
occurred  at  Honolulu  during  the  Spanish-American  war,  he  was  the  director  of  the 
First  Regiment  band,  and  also  band  master  of  the  Thirteenth  Minnesota  Volun- 
teers, an  organization  which  he  founded  and  which  his  well  timed  and  indefatig- 
able labor  placed  among  the  leading  organizations  of  its  kind  in  the  United  States 
army. 

Mr.  Watson  was  born  in  New  Brunswick,  September  22,  1864,  and  was  a  son 
of  Rev.  A.  A.  and  Jane  Caroline  Watson,  the  former  of  whom  has  passed  away, 
the  latter  now  residing  in  Minneapolis.  Mr.  Watson  spent  his  childhood  and 
acquired  his  education  in  his  native  city  and  during  practically  his  entire  active 
life  was  prominent  in  musical  circles  there,  although  he  resided  in  New  West- 
minster for  a  number  of  years.  Those  years  won  for  him  the  confidence  and 
high  regard  of  all  who  came  within  the  close  circle  of  his  friendship  and  a  place 
of  distinction  and  honor  as  a  musician.  He  was  band  master  of  the  City  Band 
for  three  years,  during  which  time  it  earned  a  professional  reputation  as  a  well 
managed,  well  directed  and  thoroughly  proficient  musical  organization,  and  he 
was  also  organist  and  choirmaster  of  St.  Andrew's  Presbyterian  church.  In 
musical  circles  generally  he  was  prominent  and  popular  and  he  gained  a  wide- 
spread reputation  as  an  able  teacher,  many  of  his  former  pupils  being  today  accom- 
plished musicians.  About  the  year  1894  Mr.  Watson  returned  to  Minneapolis 
and  there  became  quickly  prominent  in  musical  circles,  his  ability  and  energy 
carrying  him  forward  into  important  relations  with  the  musical  life  of  the  com- 
munity. Here  he  organized  the  First  Regiment  Band  and  was  its  director  for 
many  years,  leading  some  of  the  best  musicians  in  western  America.  During  this 
time  also  he  organized  and  became  the  leader  of  Watson's  Orchestra  and  was  for 
one  year  in  charge  of  the  orchestra  of  the  Bijou  Theatre.  His  administrative 
ability  directed  into  musical  channels  brought  him  prominence  and  distinction  as  a 
leader  but  it  was  fully  equaled  by  his  ability  as  a  musician,  for  he  possessed  talent 
that  seemed  destined  to  carry  him  far,  both  as  a  player  and  as  a  composer.  Prac- 
tically every  musical  instrument  was  at  his  command  although  the  violin  and  pipe 
organ  were  his  favorites,  and  his  musical  execution,  which  was  of  a  high  order, 
was  nevertheless  equaled  by  his  talent  as  a  composer.  He  arranged  many  of  the 
numbers  played  by  his  organizations  and  when  he  later  engaged  in  the  musical 
publishing  business  he  exploited  the  Thelma  March  which  enjoyed  a  wide  popu- 


CHARLES   H.   WATSON 


BRITISH    COLUMBIA  285 

larity.  His  most  notable  work  was  in  the  gathering  of  large  miltiary  bands  for 
special  grand  street  work  and  his  executive  and  organizing  ability  was  very  evi- 
dent during  the  Elks'  parade  held  in  Minneapolis  in  1897,  tne  largest  pageant  of 
its  kind  ever  seen  in  that  city. 

When  the  Spanish-American  war  broke  out  and  the  Minneapolis  Battalion 
was  drafted  for  the  expedition  to  Manila,  Mr.  Watson  linked  his  fortunes  with 
those  of  his  regiment  and  proceeded  with  it  to  San  Francisco,  where  the  army 
was  encamped  awaiting  the  arrival  of  the  transports.  Here  his  conspicuous  serv- 
ices were  again  officially  recognized  and  he  was  promoted  to  be  brigade  band- 
master. There  was  some  sickness  in  the  camp  at  that  time  and  it  is  supposed  that 
during  this  period  Mr.  Watson  contracted  typhoid  fever  which  only  developed 
after  the  troops  had  sailed  for  the  Philippines.  Upon  their  arrival  at  Honolulu 
he  was  so  ill  that  it  was  impossible  to  take  him  to  the  end  of  the  journey  and 
he  was  accordingly  left  on  the  island  under  the  charge  of  competent  nurses.  His 
health  did  not  improve,  however,  and  on  July  20,  1898,  death  claimed  him,  cut- 
ting short  a  promising  career. 

Mr.  Watson  married  on  April  16,  1890.  Miss  Margaret  Eva  Campbell,  a 
daughter  of  John  and  Mary  Campbell,  and  they  became  the  parents  of  two  chil- 
dren, Marguerite  Elizabeth  and  Campbell  Hubert  Allan.  The  family  now  reside 
at  No.  427  Fourth  street,  New  Westminster,  and  are  well  known  in  social  circles 
of  that  city. 

Mr.  Watson  had  many  friends  in  New  Westminster  and  in  other  parts  of  this 
province,  all  of  whom  deeply  mourned  the  sudden  termination  of  an  active,  suc- 
cessful and  unusually  promising  career.  Mr.  Watson  has  also  been  sadly  missed 
in  musical  circles  of  Minneapolis,  where  his  work  and  enthusiasm  had  given  a 
new  impetus  to  musical  advancement  and  where  his  contributions  to  musical 
development  were  timely  and  notable. 


JOHN  McLFOD. 

Many  are  drawn  into  real-estate  circles  because  of  the  rapid  and  substantial 
growth  of  Vancouver,  and  indeed  this  is  an  excellent  field  for  activity  along 
that  line.  Not  all  realize,  however,  that  industry,  perseverance,  capability  and 
initiative  are  just  as  important  to  the  real-estate  dealer  as  to  the  merchant  or 
manufacturer.  Mr.  McLeod,  however,  has  employed  the  qualities  mentioned 
and  since  1909  has  been  conducting  a  successful  and  growing  business  as 
president  and  managing  director  of  the  John  McLeod  Company,  Ltd.  He  was 
born  in  Glengarry,  Ontario,  August  13,  1870,  a  son  of  Murdock  and  Bella 
(Stewart)  McLeod,  well  known  farming  people  of  that  neighborhood.  In  the 
public  schools  of  Glengarry  county  the  son  acquired  his  education,  and  taking 
up  the  study  of  telegraphy  became  an  operator  for  the  Grand  Trunk  Railway  at 
Bright,  Ontario,  where  he  remained  for  four  years.  He  afterward  spent 
several  years  as  a  relieving  operator,  and  in  1897  came  to  Vancouver,  where 
he  was  employed  for  a  time  in  the  building  trade.  In  1905  he  started  in  the 
real-estate  business,  with  which  he  has  now  been  associated  for  eight  years. 
The  present  John  McLeod  Company,  Ltd.,  was  organized  in  1909  and  Mr. 
McLeod  has  since  been  in  control  of  its  affairs  as  president  and  managing  director. 
He  has  made  a  close  study  of  the  property  upon  the  market,  has  displayed  sound 
judgment  in  anticipating  the  possible  rise  or  diminution  of  values,  and  has  so 
conducted  his  affairs  as  to  win  substantial  return. 

On  the  25th  of  March,  1910,  at  Seattle,  Washington,  Mr.  McLeod  was 
married  to  Miss  Margaret  Williamson  McAdie,  of  Nanaimo,  British  Columbia,  a 
daughter  of  Henry  and  Margaret  McAdie.  Her  parents  were  pioneers  of  this 
province,  coming  here  on  their  wedding  journey  and  settling  in  Nanaimo,  where 
they  have  since  resided. 


286  BRITISH    COLUMBIA 

Mr.  McLeod  is  a  supporter  of  the  liberal  party  but  is  not  active  in  politics. 
He  is  prominent  in  Masonic  circles,  holding  membership  in  Acacia  Lodge, 
F.  &  A.  M.,  of  Vancouver ;  in  the  Royal  Arch  Chapter,  Preceptory  and  in  Gizeh 
Temple  of  the  Mystic  Shrine.  He  also  belongs  to  the  Terminal  City  Club,  and  the 
rules  and  principles  which  govern  his  conduct  are  largely  found  in  the  teachings 
of  the  Presbyterian  church,  of  which  he  is  a  member. 


HARRY   JOHN    PAINTER. 

Harry  John  Painter  is  assessment  commissioner  of  Vancouver  and  has  for 
many  years  been  active  in  civic  affairs.  Moreover,  he  is  one  of  the  pioneers  of 
British  Columbia,  having  taken  up  his  abode  in  Vancouver  in  the  year  in  which  its 
present  name  was  adopted.  He  was  born  in  Hanley,  Staffordshire,  England, 
June  14,  1856,  and  is  a  son  of  Frederick  Charles  and  Emily  (Marriner)  Painter. 
The  father  was  for  many  years  connected  with  the  pottery  business  in  England, 
having  for  a  long  period  been  traveling  representative  for  W.  T.  Copeland  & 
Sons,  of  Stoke-on-Trent,  while  later  he  was  connected  with  the  Coalport  China 
Works  in  Shropshire,  England,  for  many  years.  His  travels  in  connection  with 
business  took  him  all  over  Great  Britain  and  Ireland,  and  in  the  years  of  his 
service  on  the  road  he  became  widely  known,  being  a  familiar  figure  in  many 
cities  and  having  legions  of  friends  wherever  he  went.  He  possessed  the  genial, 
social  qualities  which  win  high  regard,  and  all  who  knew  him  spoke  of  him  in 
terms  of  great  respect. 

Harry  John  Painter  was  educated  in  the  schools  of  Bridgeworth,  Shropshire, 
England,  after  which  he  entered  the  employ  of  the  firm  of  I.  &  T.  Dimmock  & 
Company,  a  large  timber  and  lumber  concern.  He  became  a  timber  valuator  for 
that  house  and  the  work  took  him  to  various  sections  of  Great  Britain.  He 
severed  that  connection  in  February,  1881,  and  in  April  of  the  same  year  he  came 
to  Canada,  going  first  to  Winnipeg,  which  was  then  the  western  terminus  of  the 
Canadian  Pacific  Railway.  He  remained  in  Winnipeg  for  a  year,  variously 
employed,  and  in  that  time  was  looking  out  for  a  permanent  location.  He  also 
attended  night  school  at  Winnipeg,  entering  a  business  college,  in  which  he 
acquitted  himself  with  honors.  In  the  spring  of  1882  he  made  his  way  to  the 
Northwest  Territory  and  settled  at  Broadview,  Assiniboia,  where  he  engaged  in 
farming.  He  was  also  land  agent  for  the  Canadian  Pacific  Railway  and  likewise 
served  as  first  postmaster  of  Broadview,  while  in  connection  with  a  partner  he 
conducted  a  general  store.  During  that  time  he  served  on  the  jury  in  the  trial  of 
the  case  of  the  Queen  versus  Louis  Riel,  who  was  arrested  for  high  treason, 
having  been  the  instigator  and  the  leader  of  the  famous  Riel  rebellion.  He  was 
the  first  member  of  the  jury  sworn  at  that  trial,  which  took  place  at  Regina, 
Assiniboia,  in  1885. 

In  November,  1886,  Mr.  Painter  arrived  in  British  Columbia,  settling  at 
Vancouver,  where  he  became  connected  with  the  building  department  of  the 
Canadian  Pacific  Railroad,  and  so  remained  until  March,  1888.  He  was  after- 
ward with  the  land  department  of  the  road  until  October,  1899,  when  he  went  into 
business  on  his  own  account  as  a  real-estate  and  general  financial  broker  in  Van- 
couver, becoming  senior  partner  of  the  firm  of  Painter  &  Turton.  He  was  thus 
engaged  until  1903,  when,  having  been  appointed  to  the  provincial  assessment 
office  of  British  Columbia,  he  retired  from  the  real-estate  business  to  give  his 
undivided  attention  to  his  new  duties,  which  he  assumed  on  the  1st  of  January, 
1903.  He  continued  in  that  position  until  March,  1907,  when  he  was  appointed 
assessment  commissioner  of  the  city  of  Vancouver,  and  so  remains  to  the  present 
time.  His  long  continuance  in  these  offices  speaks  in  incontrovertible  terms  of  his 
ability  and  fidelity.  In  politics  Mr.  Painter  has  always  been  known  as  a  stalwart 
conservative.  He  has  taken  an  active  part  in  civic  affairs  in  Vancouver,  and 


BRITISH    COLUMBIA  287 

for  three  consecutive  terms — 1896,  1897  and  1898 — was  alderman  of  the  city,  and 
was  again  elected  for  the  year  1901. 

While  residing  in  England  Mr.  Painter  served  for  a  number  of  years  with 
the  Queen's  Own  Staffordshire  Rangers,  being  sergeant  of  that  command  when  he 
retired  from  the  service  preparatory  to  coming  to  Canada  in  1881.  He  was 
highly  complimented  when  he  passed  the  examination  for  sergeant,  the  examining 
board  stating  that  few,  if  any,  in  any  branch  of  the  service  showed  as  thorough  a 
knowledge  of  military  affairs,  tactics,  etc. 

On  the  29th  of  August,  1883,  at  Whitewood,  Assiniboia,  Mr.  Painter  was 
united  in  marriage  to  Miss  Annie  M.  Petchell,  of  Aldborough,  England,  a 
daughter  of  Edward  Petchell,  an  extensive  farmer  of  Yorkshire,  England,  who, 
after  crossing  the  Atlantic  to  Canada  in  1883,  began  farming  at  Broadview,  where 
he  remained  until  1894,  when  he  came  to  British  Columbia  to  live  with  his 
daughter  until  his  death,  which  occurred  in  1907. 

Unto  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Painter  were  born  eight  children,  seven  sons  and  a 
daughter,  all  of  whom  are  living  with  the  exception  of  the  second  son,  Frederick 
Charles,  who  passed  away  in  November,  1912.  He  was  a  fine  young  man  in  per- 
son, in  talents  and  in  character,  was  an  athlete  of  ability,  possessed  a  legion  of 
friends,  and  his  death  was  a  sad  blow  to  his  parents.  The  living  children  are: 
Emily,  a  teacher  at  Alexandra  Orphanage  School  at  Vancouver ;  Edward  Petchell, 
a  naval  architect  of  Vancouver ;  Harry  John,  a  railway  mail  clerk  and  a  member 
of  the  Vancouver  Athletic  Club  lacross  team,  the  champion  amateur  lacrosse  team 
of  the  world ;  Robert,  a  mechanical  engineer  in  the  employ  of  the  Vancouver 
Engineering  Works;  Cornelius  Stamford,  now  attending  the  Vancouver  Business 
Institute ;  Joe,  an  employe  of  the  British  Columbia  Telephone  Company ;  and 
Frank  Midforth,  at  school  in  Vancouver.  The  family  attend  the  Anglican  church, 
in  which  Mr.  Painter  holds  membership.  He  is  also  connected  with  the  Ancient 
Order  of  United  Workmen.  He  is  perhaps  best  known  through  his  official  con- 
nections, but  in  every  relation  of  life  has  commanded  the  warm  regard  of  those 
with  whom  he  has  been  associated.  His  public  record  is  most  commendable,  and 
in  all  his  service  he  has  been  actuated  by  a  loyalty  to  the  general  welfare  that 
none  questions. 


LEON  JOHNSON  LADNER. 

Among  the  younger  and  more  prominent  members  of  the  bar  of  Vancouver, 
British  Columbia,  is  Leon  Johnson  Ladner,  who  in  two  years  has  built  up  an  im- 
portant private  practice  which  connects  him  with  some  of  the  foremost  interests  of 
the  city.  A  native  of  this  province,  he  was  born  on  November  29,  1884,  and  is  a 
son  of  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Thomas  E.  Ladner,  of  whom  more  extended  mention  is  made 
in  another  part  of  this  work.  He  received  his  education  in  the  public  and  high 
schools  of  New  Westminster  and  the  University  of  Toronto,  from  which  he  grad- 
uated with  the  degree  of  B.  A.  and  with  honors  in  political  science  in  1907.  Two 
years  later  he  took  the  degree  of  LL.  B.  from  the  same  university  and  then  studied 
law  under  Sir  Charles  Hibbert  Tupper,  K.  C.  Mr.  Ladner  was  called  to  the  bar  of 
British  Columbia  in  July,  1910,  after  which  he  spent  one  year  abroad,  traveling 
throughout  various  parts  of  Europe,  during  which  time  he  supplemented  his  course 
in  economics  by  gathering  data  on  various  forms  of  taxation  and  government. 
Returning  to  Vancouver  in  the  fall  of  1911  he  engaged  in  practice  alone  for  a 
short  time  and  then  entered  into  a  partnership  with  W.  A.  Cantelon,  under  the 
firm  name  of  Ladner  &  Cantelon.  They  engage  in  general  practice  and  have 
become  recognized  as  young  men  of  more  than  ordinary  ability,  gifted  with  a  right 
understanding  of  the  law  and  able  and  thorough  in  their  preparation  of  any  cause 
entrusted  to  their  care.  Mr.  Ladner  is  also  connected  with  his  brother-in-law, 
Lantzius,  formerly  a  manufacturer  of  northern  France,  in  the  wholesale  im- 


288  BRITISH    COLUMBIA 

porting  business  with  offices  in  the  Fairfield  building.  Moreover,  he  is  a  director 
in  the  Ladner  Investment  &  Trust  Company,  Ltd. 

In  the  beautiful  city  of  Nice,  France,  on  his  first  European  tour,  Mr.  Ladner 
met  Miss  Jeanne  Lantzius,  a  resident  of  Lille,  who  was  spending  the  winter  on 
the  Riviera.  In  April,  1912,  Mr.  Ladner  returned  to  France  for  the  young  lady 
and  they  were  married  in  Brussels,  Belgium.  Mrs.  Ladner  is  a  daughter  of  Emile 
and  Helene  Lantzius,  both  natives  of  France,  her  father  being  a  well  known  manu- 
facturer of  Lille. 

In  his  political  affiliations  Mr.  Ladner  is  a  conservative  and  has  always  taken 
an  active  interest  in  the  welfare  of  his  party.  He  is  a  public  speaker  and  is  often 
called  upon  to  defend  the  cause  during  campaigns.  However,  he  is  not  an  office 
seeker.  He  is  a  member  of  the  Native  Sons  of  British  Columbia.  Progressive 
and  aggressive,  Mr.  Lander  is  typical  of  the  west,  all  of  his  actions  being  per- 
meated with  energy  and  ambition.  He  is  genial,  pleasant-mannered  and  open- 
hearted,  and  readily  supports  any  enterprise  instituted  to  promote  advancement 
along  material  or  intellectual  lines.  As  a  lawyer  he  has  already  attained  a  good 
position,  being  capable,  honest  and  conscientious.  Mr.  Ladner  has  every  occasion 
to  exhibit  the  faculties  which  a  lawyer  should  possess — skill,  ability  and  force  in 
the  presentation  of  a  case.  He  is  a  good  judge  of  human  nature  and  character 
and  last,  but  not  least,  possesses  untiring  industry. 


CHARLES  EDWARD  DOHERTY,  M.  D. 

Specialization  in  the  present  age  has  promoted  knowledge  to  a  point  largely 
approaching  perfection.  In  all  of  the  professions  there  are  men  who  are  giving 
their  attention  to  certain  departments  thereof  with  the  result  that  they  attain 
skill  and  efficiency  which  could  never  be  acquired  were  they  to  continue  in  the 
general  professional  lines.  In  this  connection  mention  should  be  made  of  Charles 
Edward  Doherty,  today  eminent  in  a  field  of  practice  in  the  treatment  of  mental 
.and  nervous  diseases.  In  1905  he  became  medical  superintendent  of  the  Provin- 
cial Hospital  for  the  Insane  at  Coquitlam.  Since  called  to  this  position  he  has 
introduced  many  new  and  novel  methods  for  the  care  of  the  mentally  deranged 
which  are  proving  of  notable  worth  in  the  restoration  of  normal  conditions,  while 
Dr.  Doherty  has  become  widely  recognized  as  a  most  serviceable  factor  in  the 
•world's  work. 

A  native  of  Peel  county,  Ontario,  he  was  born  November  28,  1873,  of  the 
marriage  of  William  F.  and  Mary  Anne  Doherty.  The  father  was  a  pioneer 
settler  of  Peel  county  and  became  one  of  the  most  successful  farmers  there.  He 
was  particularly  noted  as  a  raiser  and  exporter  of  stock  and  at  the  time  of  his 
•death  in  1907  was  one  of  the  largest  property  holders  in  Peel  county.  His  wife 
survived  him  for  several  years,  passing  away  in  January,  1913. 

In  the  public  schools  of  Peel  county  Dr.  Doherty  mastered  the  elementary 
branches  of  learning  and  later  attended  the  Toronto  Collegiate  Institute,  Trinity 
University  and  Trinity  Medical  College.  From  the  university,  in  1899,  he  received 
the  degrees  of  M.  D.  and  C.  M.,  and  from  the  medical  college  that  of  F.  T.  M.  C. 
Throughout  the  years  of  his  active  connection  with  the  profession  he  has  been 
engaged  in  hospital  practice.  Following  his  graduation  he  was  appointed  medical 
superintendent  of  the  Kootenay  Lake  General  Hospital  in  1899  and  there  re- 
mained until  1902,  when  he  was  appointed  assistant  medical  superintendent  of  the 
Provincial  Hospital  for  the  Insane  at  Coquitlam,  acting  in  that  capacity  for  three 
years  or  until  1905,  when  he  became  medical  superintendent.  Speaking  of  a 
recent  visit  to  the  institution,  Dr.  Wesbrook,  president  of  the  new  provincial 
university,  said:  "I  was  delighted  with  all  I  saw;"  and  after  eulogizing  certain 
features  of  the  institution  as  conducted  under  Dr.  Doherty's  supervision,  he 
pointed  out  that  the  agricultural  work  carried  on  at  the  hospital  farm  will  render 
it  a  valuable  adjunct  to  the  university  when  the  classes  in  practical  agriculture 


DR.  CHARLES  E.  DOHERTY 


BRITISH    COLUMBIA  291 

are  opened.  In  speaking  of  the  system  of  classification  of  patients  introduced 
by  Dr.  Doherty,  President  Wesbrook  said  that  it  was  ahead  of  anything  on  the 
American  continent  and  that  the  institution  promised  to  give  results  in  the  treat- 
ment of  the  mentally  afflicted  that  would  surprise  the  world. 

In  1905  Dr.  Doherty  was  married  to  Miss  Elweena  Martin,  a  native  of  Brit- 
ish Columbia  and  a  daughter  of  S.  B.  Martin,  one  of  the  provincial  pioneers. 
They  have  three  children,  two  sons  and  a  daughter.  Dr.  Doherty  has  never  dissi- 
pated his  energies  over  various  fields  of  labor  but  has  ever  concentrated  his 
efforts  upon  his  profession  and  today  occupies  a  notable  place  among  the  emi- 
nent specialists  on  mental  diseases  in  the  country.  His  broad  study  has  made 
him  familiar  with  the  methods  followed  in  leading  Canadian  and  American  insti- 
tutions and  also  abroad,  and  practical  knowledge  and  experience  have  enabled 
him  to  institute  new  plans  the  beneficial  results  of  which  have  been  directly  observ- 
able. Humanity  and  science  constitute  the  basis  for  his  labors  in  this  connec- 
tion, and  when  we  judge  of  the  individual  according  to  the  standards  of  a  mod- 
ern philosopher  who  has  said :  "Not  the  good  that  comes  to  us,  but  the  good  that 
comes  to  the  world  through  us,  is  the  measure  of  our  success,"  then  the  life  work 
of  Dr.  Doherty  may  be  said  to  be  most  successful. 


JAMES  EDWARD  McMULLEN. 

James  Edward  McMullen,  solicitor  for  the  Canadian  Pacific  Railroad  at  Van- 
couver, was  born  in  Woodstock,  Ontario,  June  20,  1872,  his  parents  being  the 
Rev.  W.  T.  and  Susanna  (Gilbert)  McMullen,  who  were  representatives  of 
Ontario  pioneer  families.  The  son  was  a  pupil  in  the  public  and  high  schools 
of  Woodstock  and  afterward  entered  Osgoode  Hall  at  Toronto,  Ontario,  from 
which  he  was  graduated  with  the  class  of  1896.  Having  carefully  prepared  for 
the  practice  of  law,  he  was  called  to  the  Ontario  bar  in  that  year  and  opened  a 
law  office  at  Gait,  Ontario,  where  he  remained  until  1898.  He  then  joined  the 
staff  of  the  legal  department  of  the  Canadian  Pacific  Railway  at  Montreal,  and 
remained  there  until  1906,  when  he  came  to  Vancouver  to  take  charge  of  that 
company's  legal  business  in  British  Columbia. 

At  Toronto,  Ontario,  on  the  3d  of  January,  1906,  Mr.  McMullen  married 
Miss  Naomi  Temple,  a  daughter  of  Edmund  B.  Temple.  Mr.  Temple  was  govern- 
ment engineer  for  a  number  of  years  at  Toronto  Harbor  and  later  had  charge  of 
the  harbors  at  Fort  William  and  Port  Arthur,  Ontario.  Unto  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Mc- 
Mullen have  been  born  two  sons  and  a  daughter,  Edmund  Temple,  Naomi  Temple 
and  James  Temple.  Mr.  McMullen  is  a  Presbyterian.  In  politics  he  is  a  liberal. 
He  is  a  member  of  the  Vancouver  Club  of  Vancouver  and  the  Union  Club  of 
Victoria. 


ROBERT  MACKAY  FRIPP. 

Robert  Mackay  Fripp,  architect,  whose  reputation  and  renown  are  based  upon 
his  artistic  nature,  thorough  training  and  well  developed  powers,  was  born  in 
Clifton,  England,  December  16,  1858,  his  parents  being  George  Arthur  and  Mary 
Fripp.  George  Arthur  Fripp,  R.  W.  S.,  was  at  one  time  court  painter  to  Prince 
Albert  and  Queen  Victoria. 

Robert  M.  Fripp  was  educated  at  Belsize  Manor,  a  private  school,  and  under 
private  tutorship.  In  1874  he  began  the  study  of  architecture  in  London  and  ten 
years  later  entered  upon  the  active  practice  of  his  profession  in  Auckland,  New 
Zealand,  where  he  remained  for  about  four  years.  In  1888  he  came  to  Vancouver, 
where  he  has  since  practiced  his  profession,  but  prior  to  that  time  he  had  traveled 
to  a  considerable  extent,  studying  widely  in  connection  with  his  business.  Be- 


292  BRITISH    COLUMBIA 

ginning  in  1878  he  spent  about  a  year  in  travel  in  South  Africa,  another  year  in 
eastern  Asia,  the  third  year  in  Europe,  and  from  1881  until  1884  he  was  in  Tas- 
mania and  Australia.  He  then  began  practice  in  Auckland,  New  Zealand,  remain- 
ing there  from  1884  to  1888,  when  he  came  to  the  northwest.  Since  that  time  he 
has  lectured  to  some  extent  at  Chautauquas,  art  clubs,  arts  and  crafts  societies  and 
before  other  organizations,  delivering  a  course  of  lectures  on  art  and  archaeology 
and  architectural  ornament.  His  wide  reading,  his  broad  experience  and  his  deep 
research  have  enabled  him  to  speak  not  only  entertainingly  but  also  with  authority 
upon  questions  relating  to  architecture  in  any  of  its  various  phases  or  with  refer- 
ence to  its  history.  He  was  again  in  New  Zealand  from  1896  until  1898  and  in  the 
latter  year  returned  to  British  Columbia.  From  1901  until  1908  he  was  in 
England  and  California  and  was  made  a  certificated  architect  (L.  A.  C.)  in  1906. 
In  1908  he  returned  to  Vancouver,  where  he  has  since  engaged  in  practice,  and  in 
1910  he  was  made  a  fellow  of  the  Royal  Society  of  Arts.  He  became  also  a  fellow 
of  the  Royal  Institute  of  British  Architects  in  1901  but  afterward  resigned.  He 
is  the  author  of  essays  on  Arts  and  Crafts,  the  Maori  Art  and  others,  and  his  writ- 
ings are  of  deep  interest  to  all  who  have  had  technical  training  along  those  lines 
or  who  have  an  artistic  sense  that  finds  gratification  in  carrying  on  investigation 
of  that  character. 

On  the  27th  of  February,  1887,  at  Auckland,  New  Zealand,  Mr.  Fripp  was 
united  in  marriage  to  M,iss  Christina  Nichol,  a  daughter  of  John  W.  and  Annie 
Nichol.  Her  father,  late  of  Jesmond,  near  Newcastle,  England,  was  a  representa- 
tive of  an  old  English  family.  Unto  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Fripp  have  been  born  four 
children,  George  Mackay,  Clifford  Russell,  Alice  and  Dorothea. 

Mr.  Fripp  was  for  several  years  a  member  of  the  First  Berkshire  Volunteers. 
In  South  Africa  he  joined  the  mounted  infantry,  with  which  he  was  connected  for 
eighteen  months,  and  he  was  also  a  member  of  the  New  Zealand  Garrison  Artillery 
and  later  of  the  New  Zealand  Mounted  Infantry.  While  in  that  country  he 
became  a  member  of  New  Zealand  Lodge,  F.  &  A.  M.,  and  his  religious  faith  is 
that  of  the  Anglican  church.  That  he  is  interested  in  municipal  affairs  and  in  those 
things  which  are  a  matter  of  civic  virtue  and  civic  pride  is  indicated  in  the  fact 
that  he  is  a  member  of  the  Vancouver  City  Beautiful  Association  and  a  vice 
president  of  the  Arts,  Historical  and  Scientific  Association;  also  a  member  of 
the  board  of  the  Canadian  Club,  and  more  strictly  along  professional  lines  he  is 
connected  with  the  Pylon  Architectural  Club  of  Vancouver  and  the  Canadian 
Handicrafts  Guild  of  Vancouver,  being  president  of  the  former  and  vice  president 
of  the  latter.  Actuated  at  all  times  by  a  spirit  of  progress,  he  could  never  con- 
tent himself  with  mediocrity  along  professional  lines  and  has  gained  that  broad 
knowledge  and  well  merited  reputation  which  come  through  wide  study  and  highly 
developed  powers. 


THOMAS  JOSEPH  ARMSTRONG. 

The  fact  that  Thomas  Joseph  Armstrong  has  held  the  important  office  of 
sheriff  of  Westminster  county  for  twenty  years  speaks  for  itself  and  stands  as 
evidence  of  his  ability,  faithfulness  to  duty  and  his  sense  of  honor  as  a  public 
servant.  A  native  of  New  Westminster,  he  has  made  a  record  which  is  a  credit 
to  himself  and  reflects  honor  upon  his  community.  His  public  career  began  in 
1886,  when  he  became  deputy  to  his  distinguished  father,  who  was  then  sheriff, 
and  he  has  since  continued  in  the  public  service.  He  is  one  of  the  most  popular 
officials  in  Westminster  county  and  enjoys  the  confidence  and  good- will  of  all 
who  know  him.  Born  in  1864,  he  is  a  son  of  the  Hon.  William  J.  and  Honor  C. 
(Ladner)  Armstrong,  an  extended  biography  of  whom  appears  in  another  part 
of  this  work. 

Thomas  J.  Armstrong  acquired  his  education  in  the  common  and  high 
schools  of  New  Westminster,  continuing  his  studies  to  his  eighteenth  year,  in 


THOMAS   J.  ARMSTRONG 


BRITISH    COLUMBIA  295 

which  he  became  a  clerk  in  a  book  and  stationery  store  in  his  .native  city.  He 
subsequently  removed  to  San  Francisco,  California,  where  he  learned  the  drug 
business  and  upon  his  return,  to  British  Columbia,  in  1885,  engaged  in  that  line 
in  partnership  with  F.  H.  Coulter  in  New  Westminster,  but  in  the  following  year 
disposed  of  his  interests  to  D.  S.  Curtis  and  in  May,  1886,  began  his  public 
career.  At  that  time  he  became  deputy  to  his  father,  who  was  then  sheriff  of 
Westminster  county,  and  continued  as  such  until  September  17,  1892,  on  which 
date  he  was  appointed  acting  sheriff.  When  the  act  of  parliament  dividing 
Westminster  and  Vancouver  counties  went  into  effect  on  October  27,  1892,  he 
received  the  appointment  of  acting  sheriff,  of  the  latter  county  as  well,  serving' for 
both  counties  until  July  25,  1893,  on  which  date  he  was  commissioned  sheriff  of 
Westminster  county,  in  which  office  he  has  since  so  ably  served.  The  work 
he  has  done  for  the  past  twenty  years  in  his  official  capacity  deserves  the 
highest  commendation,  and  through  his  efforts  he  has  largely  succeeded  in 
stamping  out  lawlessness  and  controlling  the  criminal  element.  In  August,  1901, 
Mr.  Armstrong  was  also  appointed  issuer  of  marriage  licenses,  which  is  still 
part  of  his  official  duties. 

In  1888  Thomas  J.  Armstrong  was  united  in  marriage  to  Miss  Annie  Kerr, 
a  native  of  Ingersoll,  Ontario,  and  a  daughter  of  Daniel  Kerr,  a  pioneer  carriage 
manufacturer  of  that  city.  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Armstrong  are  the  parents  of  one 
daughter,  Nora  Marguerite.  Prominent  in  fraternal  circles,  Mr.  Armstrong 
served  as  deputy  grand  master  of  the  Masonic  grand  lodge  of  British  Columbia 
and  in  June,  1905,  was  elected  grand  master  of  the  grand  lodge  of  the  province, 
the  election  being  held  in  New  Westminster.  He  also  is  a  member  of  the  West- 
minster Club.  Faithful  to  his  duties  and  loyal  to  his  country,  Mr.  Armstrong 
gives  a  leading  example  of  what  constitutes  right-minded  citizenship  and  receives 
the  confidence  and  good-will  of  all  with  whom  he  comes  in  contact  in  an 
official  or  social  way. 

CHARLES   H.   CARNWATH. 

Charles  H.  Carnwath,  organizer  and  managing  director  of  the  False  Creek 
Lumber  Company,  has  been  connected  with  the  business  since  1906  and  in  its 
conduct  has  proven  his  worth  and  executive  force.  Vancouver  has  thus  come  to 
recognize  him  as  an  energetic  and  self-made  man,  for  he  owes  his  progress  en- 
tirely to  his  own  labors.  He  was  born  in  Riverside,  Albert  county,  New  Bruns- 
wick, in  1867,  his  parents  being  James  and  Rosa  (Kyle)  Carnwath,  both  of  whom 
were  natives  of  Ireland,  in  which  country  they  were  reared  and  married.  Soon 
afterward  they  crossed  the  Atlantic  to  New  Brunswick  and  settled  at  Riverside, 
where  for  a  few  years  the  father  engaged  in  teaching  in  the  public  schools.  Later 
he  became  a  general  merchant  in  that  town  and  there  they  spent  the  remainder 
of  their  lives. 

Charles  H.  Carnwath  attended  public  and  normal  schools  at  Riverside  and  was 
also  a  teacher  in  the  country  schools  for  one  year.  But  the  west  with  its  widen- 
ing possibilities  attracted  him  and  in  1888  he  came  to  Vancouver  which  was  still 
but  a  village  at  that  time.  He  was  first  employed  in  connection  with  the  Leamy 
&  Kyle  mill,  in  the  early  days  known  as  the  Red  mill.  This  was  the  second  mill 
built  on  False  Creek.  He  worked  there  for  seven  and  one-half  years  in  the 
capacity  of  shipper  and  afterward  became  connected  with  the  Royal  City  mill, 
which  was  the  first  built  on  the  creek.  He  represented  that  business  as  shipper 
for  one  year  and  later  engaged  as  shipper  in  the  Robertson  &  Hackett  mill,  with 
which  he  was  connected  for  five  years.  On  the  expiration  of  that  period  he  re- 
turned to  the  Leamy  &  Kyle  mill.  In  the  meantime  the  business  had  been  reor- 
ganized under  the  name  of  the  Vancouver  Lumber  Company  and  Mr.  Carnwath 
continued  there  as  shipper  until  1906,  when,  ambitious  to  engage  in  business  on  his 
own  account,  he  utilized  his  earnings  in  the  establishment  of  a  business  of  his  own, 


296  BRITISH    COLUMBIA 

organizing  the  False  Creek  Lumber  Company,  of  which  he  is  the  managing  direc- 
tor. They  mill  all  kinds  of  native  lumber,  with  an  output  of  seventy  thousand 
feet  of  finished  lumber  per  day,  and  the  magnitude  of  the  enterprise  is  furthermore 
indicated  in  the  fact  that  they  employ  on  an  average  of  one  hundred  and  thirty 
men  and  ship  to  all  parts  of  Canada  west  of  the  maritime  provinces.  The  business 
has,  been  developed  largely  through  the  enterprise  and  capability  of  Mr.  Carnwath, 
who  is  familiar  with  all  branches  of  the  lumber  industry  and  whose  sound  judg- 
ment and  unfaltering  activity  have  constituted  the  basis  of  this  successful 
undertaking. 

In  Vancouver,  on  the  2$d  of  May,  1895,  Mr.  Carnwath  was  married  to  Miss 
Phoebe  Stewart,  a  daughter  of  D.  M.  Stewart,  a  well  known  pioneer  of  Vancouver. 
They  have  three  children,  Irene  Hamilton,  Charlotte  Feme  and  Velma  Stewart 
Mr.  Carnwath  votes  with  the  liberal  party.  He  and  his  wife  are  members  of  the 
Mount  Pleasant  Presbyterian  church,  in  the  work  of  which  they  are  actively  and 
helpfully  interested.  Mr.  Carnwath  deserves  much  credit  for  what  he  has  accom- 
plished in  a  business  way  and  his  example  should  serve  as  a  source  of  inspiration 
and  encouragement  to  young  men  who  start  out  as  he  did,  practically  empty- 
handed,  but  to  whom  the  path  of  opportunity  is  ever  open. 


FRANCIS  WILLIAM  ROUNSEFELL. 

The  history  of  a  country  is  no  longer  the  record  of  wars  and  conquests  but 
of  business  activity  and  enterprise,  the  conquest  being  no  longer  that  of  man 
over  man  but  of  mind  over  matter.  Francis  William  Rounsefell  is  one  who 
through  his  intelligently  directed  efforts  has  worked  his  way  continuously 
upward  and  is  now  managing  director  of  Ceperley,  Rounsefell  &  Company, 
Limited,  insurance,  loaning  and  financial  agents.  He  was  born  in  Wolf- 
ville,  Nova  Scotia,  February  19,  1868,  and  is  a  son  of  John  and  Margaret 
(DeWolf )  Rounsefell.  The  father,  a  native  of  Cornwall,  England,  is  now  living 
at  Chilliwack,  British  Columbia.  The  mother  was  descended  from  United 
Empire  Loyalist  stock  and  belonged  to  the  DeWolf  family  in  whose  honor  the 
town  of  Wolfville,  Nova  Scotia,  was  named. 

Francis  W.  Rounsefell  pursued  his  education  in  the  schools  of  England  and 
since  1882  has  been  identified  with  the  west,  having  in  that  year  removed  to 
Brandon,  Manitoba,  where  he  entered  the  employ  of  the  Merchants  Bank,  with 
which  he  continued  for  a  number  of  years.  In  February,  1888,  he  came  to 
Vancouver  and  was  employed  for  a  few  years  by  the  firm  of  Ross  &  Ceperley, 
with  whom  he  continued  after  the  incorporation  of  their  insurance  and  loan 
business  under  the  name  of  the  Vancouver  Loan  Trust  Savings  &  Guarantee 
Company,  Limited.  The  concern  was  later  changed  to  Ceperley,  Loewen  & 
Campbell,  Limited,  and  Mr.  Rounsefell,  becoming  financially  interested  in  the 
business,  was  elected  secretary.  When  the  present  corporation  of  Ceperley, 
Rousefell  &  Company,  Limited,  was  formed  he  was  elected  managing  director, 
which  position  he  still  fills.  In  1910  Mr.  Ceperley,  retired  from  active  participa- 
tion in  the  business  but  is  still  president.  Active  control  and  management  largely 
devolve  upon  Mr.  Rounsefell,  who  is  a  prominent  representative  of  financial  and 
insurance  interests  here,  the  firm  controlling  an  extensive  business,  their  clientage 
having  increased  year  by  year  since  the  organization  of  the  original  company. 
Mr.  Rounsefell  is  also  a  director  of  the  Vancouver  Milling  &  Grain  Company, 
Limited,  and  is  connected  with  the  directorate  of  a  number  of  mining  com- 
panies. His  attention,  however,  is  chiefly  given  to  the  interests  of  Ceperley, 
Rounsefell  &  Company,  Limited,  today  the  leading  concern  in  the  fire  insurance 
field  in  the  province,  their  business  o'ertopping  that  of  all  others.  They  also 
handle  real  estate  and  as  financial  agents  conduct  a  large  loaning  business, 
although  insurance  is  the  principal  feature.  They  are  the  general  agents  of  the 
Phoenix  of  London  and  of  the  Liverpool  &  London  &  Globe  Insurance  Company. 


FEANCIS  W.  ROUNSEFELL 


299 

On  the  3  ist  of  January,  1898,  in  Vancouver,  British  Columbia,  Mr.  Rounsefell 
was  married  to  Miss  Elizabeth  DeWolf  Vaughan,  a  daughter  of  Simon  and  Sarah 
Vaughan,  connected  with  the  well  known  firm  of  shipowners  in  Liverpool.  Mr. 
and  Mrs.  Rounsefell  have  two  children,  Eric  DeWolf  and  Marjorie  Vaughan. 
The  parents  hold  membership  in  Christ  church,  Anglican.  Mr.  Rounsefell  gives 
his  political  allegiance  to  the  conservative  party,  and  something  of  the  nature  of 
his  interests  and  recreation  is  indicated  in  the  fact  that  he  holds  membership  in 
the  Vancouver,  Country  and  Shaughnessy  Heights  Golf  Clubs  and  is  a  director 
and  vice  president  of  the  Vancouver  Horse  Show  Association.  The  steps  in  his 
orderly  progression  are  easily  discernible,  his  advancement  being  made  because 
of  his  recognition  and  utilization  of  opportunities,  his  laudable  ambition  and  his 
undaunted  enterprise. 

HENRY  SIGLER. 

For  twenty-one  years  Henry  Sigler  has  been  a  resident  of  the  northwest,  and 
since  1909  has  maintained  his  home  in  Vancouver,  where  he  is  well  known  as  the 
president  of  the  Alberta  Financial  Corporation,  Ltd.,  financial  agents  and  dealers 
in  real  estate.  He  was  born  in  Roumania,  on  the  i2th  of  October,  1867.  When  a 
young  man  of  twenty-one  years  he  crossed  the  Atlantic  to  the  United  States, 
landing  in  New  York  City  in  1888.  The  following  year  he  made  his  way  to 
eastern  Canada  and  after  three  years  spent  in  that  section  of  the  country  came  to 
the  northwest  in  1892.  He  embarked  in  general  merchandising  at  Edmonton, 
Alberta,  in  1895  an<^  there  remained  in  trade  until  1909,  or  for  a  period  of  four- 
teen years.  He  then  came  to  Vancouver  and  in  1911  was  instrumental  in  organiz- 
ing and  incorporating  the  Alberta  Financial  Corporation,  Ltd.,  of  which  he  was 
elected  president. 

On  the  22d  of  September,  1898,  in  Montreal,  Quebec,  Mr.  Sigler  was  united 
in  marriage  to  Miss  Fannie  Lehrer.  They  have  become  the  parents  of  two  sons, 
David  and  Maurice.  Mr.  Sigler  was  a  member  of  Edmonton  Lodge,  A.  F.  &  A.  M., 
which  he  joined  in  1898,  and,  following  his  removal  to  Vancouver,  he  transferred 
his  membership  to  Melrose  Lodge  in  1912.  He  belongs  to  the  Progress  Club  and, 
like  his  associates  in  that  organization,  is  much  interested  in  all  that  pertains 
to  the  welfare  and  upbuilding  of  the  city,  the  exploitation  of  its  resources  and  its 
substantial  development.  He  has  never  had  occasion  to  regret  his  determination  to 
seek  a  home  in  the  new  world,  for  here  he  has  found  the  opportunities  which  he 
sought  and  which  are  always  open  to  ambitious,  energetic  young  men,  and  in  their 
improvement  he  has  made  continuous  advancement  along  business  lines. 


OSCAR  BRUCE  ALLAN. 

Among  the  enterprises  which  make  Vancouver  one  of  the  attractive  commercial 
centers  on  the  Pacific  coast  is  the  jewelry  establishment  owned  and  managed  by 
Oscar  Bruce  Allan,  who  has  a  splendidly  appointed  store,  in  which  he  carries  a 
large  stock  and  in  which  he  employs  thirty-six  people.  He  keeps  in  close  touch 
with  the  progress  of  the  times  in  all  of  his  business  affairs  and  his  store  sets  the 
standard  which  many  others  follow.  Mr.  Allan  is  a  native  of  Guelph,  Ontario, 
born  July  22,  1877,  and  his  parents  are  John  and  Eliza  Allan.  The  family  is  one 
of  the  oldest  of  Guelph,  having  been  established  there  in  1833.  Representatives 
of  the  name  were  the  first  millers  and  the  first  distillers  of  that  place  and  the  old 
home  was  the  first  house  built  in  Guelph — a  log  structure  that  is  still  standing. 
It  was  built  by  the  Upper  Canada  Company  for  their  resident  engineer  and  when 
Mr.  Allan's  grandfather,  William  Allan,  succeeded  to  that  position  he  also  became 
the  occupant  of  the  house.  After  years  spent  in  the  employ  of  the  company  he 


300  BRITISH    COLUMBIA 

retired  and  erected  flour  mills,  which  for  a  number  of  years  he  owned  and  suc- 
cessfully operated.  The  log  house  built  by  the  Upper  Canada  Company  was  later 
used  by  the  Canadian  Pacific  Railroad  as  a  depot  until  about  two  years  ago.  The 
lime  used  in  building  the  foundation  of  the  house  was  carried  on  the  backs  of 
men,  a  sack  at  a  time,  over  a  distance  of  forty-eight  miles  from  Toronto.  The 
Allan  family  shared  in  all  of  the  hardships  and  privations  incident  to  pioneer  life 
and  were  active  in  the  development  of  Ontario,  where  they  were  among  the  first 
settlers. 

Oscar  Bruce  Allan  pursued  his  education  in  the  public  schools  of  Guelph  and 
after  putting  aside  his  text-books  turned  his  attention  to  the  jewelry  trade  there 
serving  a  five-year  apprenticeship  and  remaining  in  the  business  at  that  point  until 
1897,  when  he  came  to  Vancouver,  where  he  worked  in  a  jewelry  store  for  some 
time.  In  19/34  he  established  his  present  business.  He  now  has  a  large  establish- 
ment, employing  about  thirty-six  people.  His  stock  is  extensive  and  complete, 
including  goods  of  both  domestic  and  foreign  manufacture,  and  the  attractive 
arrangement  of  the  store,  the  well  known  reliability  of  his  business  methods  and 
his  unfaltering  energy  have  brought  to  him  a  substantial  measure  of  success.  Pos- 
sibly his  is  one  of  the  largest  individual  jewelry  stores  in  Canada.  As  he  has  pros- 
pered in  his  undertakings  he  has  also  invested  to  some  extent  in  Vancouver  realty 
but  concentrates  his  efforts  upon  his  mercantile  interests  and  is  widely  acknowl- 
edged to  be  the  leading  jeweler  of  Vancouver. 

On  the  23d  of  September,  1901,  in  Vancouver,  Mr.  Allan  was  united  in  mar- 
riage to  Miss  Ellen  Masters,  a  daughter  of  Thomas  and  Ellen  Masters,  who  came 
to  this  city  shortly  after  the  fire  of  1886.  Both  are  still  residing  here.  Mr.  Allan 
is  a  member  of  Southern  Cross  Lodge,  A.  F.  &  A.  M.,  of  Vancouver,  and  belongs 
also  to  the  Terminal  City  Club  and  to  Christ  church.  It  will  thus  be  seen  that 
business  does  not  monopolize  his  time  to  the  exclusion  of  other  interests  but  that 
his  life  is  well  balanced  in  its  activities.  Men  have  come  to  know  that  he  is  to  be 
relied  upon  as  a  citizen  as  well  as  a  business  man  and  as  a  friend  as  well  as  a 
factor  in  public  life,  and  it  would  be  difficult  to  find  one  who  has  more  genuine 
friends  in  Vancouver  than  Oscar  Bruce  Allan. 


JOHN  DAVID  ROSS. 

Commercial  and  industrial  enterprises  are  the  foundations  upon  which  are 
builded  a  city's  development,  prosperity  and  greatness.  Among  those  who  have 
contributed  to  the  result  accomplished  in  Vancouver,  i§  John  David  Ross,  a  show 
case  manufacturer,  who  has  a  large  and  well  equipped  plant  and  annually  places 
upon  the  market  an  extensive  output.  He  is  today  regarded  as  one  of  the  fore- 
most representatives  of  industrial  interests  in  Vancouver.  He  was  born  in 
Glengarry,  Ontario,  December  19,  1863,  and  is  a  son  of  David  and  Emily  (Socier) 
Ross,  the  former  a  native  of  Scotland  and  the  latter  of  Ontario.  They  resided  in 
Glengarry  until  1891,  when  they  came  to  British  Columbia.  The  father  passed 
away  in  Kamloops  and  the  mother  in  Vancouver. 

John  David  Ross,  spending  his  youthful  days  under  the  parental  roof,  was  a 
pupil  in  the  public  schools  of  Glengarry  and  while  yet  a  boy  in  his  teens  learned 
the  carpenter's  trade  with  his  father,  who  was  a  contractor.  At  a  very  early  age 
he  began  contracting  on  his  own  account  and  when  a  youth  of  sixteen  had  four- 
teen carpenters  in  his  employ— a  remarkable  record  for  one  of  his  years.  He 
continued  in  that  business  there  until  1886,  when  he  came  to  British  Columbia 
and  worked  on  stations  for  the  Canadian  Pacific  Railway  between  Donald  and 
Kamloops  for  a  short  time.  Locating  in  Kamloops,  he  there  engaged  in  the 
contracting  business  as  a  member  of  the  firm  of  McGilhvray  &  Ross,  but  after 
a  year  this  partnership  was  dissolved.  ,Mr.  Ross  remained  alone  in  the  con- 
tracting business  for  six  years  at  Kamloops,  .after  which  he  came  to  Vancouver 
in  1893  and  began  contracting  in  a  small  way;  but  owing  to  the  fact  that  very 


JOHN  D;  ROSS 


303 

little  building  was  being  done  here  at  that  time,  he  soon  gave  up  the  work  and  for 
a  period  was  employed  in  a  sash  and  door  factory.  In  1900,  however,  he  began 
the  manufacture  of  show  cases,  erecting  a  work  bench  in  one  room  of  his  home. 
He  had  to  borrow  ten  dollars  to  buy  oak  for  the  first  two  cases  which  he  built. 
He  soon  gained  a  start,  however,  and  afterward  built  a  little  shop,  fourteen  by 
twenty-eight  feet,  on  the  rear  of  his  lot  at  No.  43  Eighth  avenue,  Mount  Pleasant. 
About  a  year  later  he  tore  down  this  shop  and  built  another,  twenty-two  by 
forty-eight  feet,  on  the  same  site,  put  in  a  few  machines  and  employed  four  men. 
He  remained  there  for  two  years  and  then  removed  to  Dufferin  street,  adjoining 
the  location  of  his  present  plant.  There  he  erected  a  frame  building  covering 
two  lots  and,  enlarging  and  improving  his  plant,  furnished  employment  to 
twenty  men.  In  1909  he  sold  a  third  interest  in  the  business  to  J.  O.  Perry  and 
they  erected  their  present  quarters,  now  occupying  a  spacious  brick  building  at 
No.  291  Dufferin  street.  This  building  is  three-story  and  basement,  one  hun- 
dred by  one  hundred  feet,  and  is  equipped  with  the  most  modern  machinery  to 
facilitate  the  work  in  their  line.  They  employ  from  forty  to  fifty  men  and 
manufacture  all  kinds  of  show  cases,  bank,  store  and  office  fixtures  and  have  a 
complete  beveling  and  silvering  plant  for  all  kinds  of  mirrors.  Their  output 
amounts  in  value  to  about  one  hundred  thousand  dollars  per  year  and  their  goods 
are  sent  to  all  parts  of  the  province.  In  July,  1912,  Mr.  Ross  purchased  his 
partner's  interest  and  is  now  sole  proprietor  of  this  business,  which  has  grown 
steadily  in  volume  and  importance  until  it  is  now  one  of  the  foremost  manufactur- 
ing enterprises  of  Vancouver.  Its  development  has  been  along  substantial  lines 
and  the  secret  of  success  is  found  in  the  energy,  determination  and  straight- 
forward business  methods  of  the  proprietor.  He  has  always  maintained  high 
business  standards  in  the  character  of  material  used,  in  the  quality  of  workman- 
ship and  in  the  treatment  accorded  patrons,  and  as  the  years  have  gone  by  the 
success  of  this  enterprise  has  grown  until  Mr.  Ross  is  today  numbered  among 
the  leading  manufacturers  of  Vancouver. 

On  the  3d  of  April,  1890,  in  Kamloops,  British  Columbia,  Mr.  Ross  was 
married  to  Miss  Agnes  Brown,  a  native  of  Mount  Forest,  Grey  county,  Ontario, 
then  residing  in  Kamloops.  Unto  them  have  been  born  seven  children,  as  fol- 
lows: Stanley  David,  Winifred  Margaret,  Carmen  Edwin,  Allan,  Russell,  Loren 
and  Emily. 

In  politics  Mr.  Ross  is  a  conservative  and  while  interested  in  vital  questions 
of  good  government,  he  is  not  an  active  worker  in  party  ranks,  his  time  and 
attention  being  fully  occupied  with  his  business  interests,  which  for  many  years 
have  been  of  constantly  growing  importance.  He  may  truly  be  called  a  self- 
made  man,  for  whatever  success  he  has  achieved  is  attributable  to  his  own  labors 
and  his  well  defined  and  carefully  executed  plans.  His  record  shows  what  may 
be  accomplished  when  determination  and  energy  lead  the  way  and  proves  that 
success  and  an  honorable  name  may  be  won  simultaneously. 


PERCY  FRAZIER. 

The  course  of  years  may  bring  the  depletion  of  natural  resources,  yet  those 
of  British  Columbia  seem  almost  inexhaustible.  She  has  rich  mineral  districts, 
splendid  forests  and  broad  prairie  lands  and  the  entire  northwest  furnishes  splen- 
did opportunity  for  the  investor.  Mr.  Frazier  is  active  in  controlling  and  directing 
interests  along  those  lines  as  a  dealer  in  timber  lands  and  real-estate,  fire  and 
marine  insurance  and  as  financial  agent.  Within  the  past  decade  there  has  come 
to  the  northwest  a  great  band  of  American  citizens — men  of  enterprise  who  have 
recognized  the  opportunities  of  this  section  and  are  utilizing  them  not  only  for 
their  own  benefit  but  also  in  the  upbuilding  and  improvement  of  the  district.  To 
this  class  belongs  Percy  Frazier,  who  was  born  in  Joliet,  Illinois,  June  n,  1884, 
a  son  of  Richard  and  Mary  Jane  Frazier,  who  were  among  the  early  pioneers  of 


304  BRITISH    COLUMBIA 

that  state.  The  son,  spending  his  youthful  days  under  the  parental  roof,  was  a 
student  in  the  public  schools  of  Joliet  until  1894,  when  the  family  removed  to  the 
northwest,  settling  at  Vancouver,  where  he  again  attended  public  schools.  He 
started  in  the  business  world  in  1899  as  an  employe  of  a  local  grocery  concern, 
with  which  he  remained  for  a  few  years  and  then  resigned  to  enter  the  employ 
of  Swift  &  Company,  wholesale  dealers  in  meats  and  provisions.  Following  his 
marriage  in  1907  he  became  interested  with  his  father-in-law  in  some  timber 
lands,  although  still  in  the  employ  of  Swift  &  Company.  Two  years  later  he 
resigned  his  position  with  that  corporation  and  entered  into  a  partnership  with  his 
father-in-law  in  the  lumber  business  under  the  firm  name  of  Frazier  &  McNair. 
This  partnership  was  dissolved  in  1910  and  Mr.  Frazier  continued  the  business  on 
his  own  account  under  the  firm  style  of  P.  Frazier  &  Company  until  May  i,  1913, 
when  he  organized  the  Union  Finance  Company,  Limited,  which  absorbed  both 
P.  Frazier  &  Company  and  the  British  Underwriters,  Limited,  and  of  which  Mr. 
Frazier  became  president  and  so  continues  to  the  present  time.  The  Union  Finance 
Company,  Limited,  is  a  close  corporation  with  a  capital  of  twenty-five  thousand 
dollars  and  doing  a  general  insurance  and  financial  brokerage  business.  They  are 
general  agents  in  British  Columbia  for  the  Los  Angeles  Fire  Insurace  Company  of 
Los  Angeles,  California ;  the  Franklin  Fire  Insurance  Company  of  Philadelphia ; 
the  Western  Union  Fire  Insurance  Company  of  Vancouver,  British  Columbia ;  the 
German  Commercial  Accident  Insurance  Company  of  Philadelphia ;  and  the  Mis- 
souri Fidelity  &  Casualty  Company  of  Springfield,  Missouri.  Though  the  com- 
pany is  young,  by  their  absorption  of  the  two  aforementioned  companies  they  are 
already  doing  a  large  business  and  their  prospects  for  the  future  are  of  the 
brightest. 

Mr.  Frazier  is  largely  conversant  with  values  and  with  opportunities  for  invest- 
ment in  timber  lands  and  other  real  estate  and  has  controlled  important  activities 
along  those  lines.  Previous  to  the  formation  of  the  Union  Finance  Company, 
Limited,  he  also  conducted  a  successful  fire  and  marine  insurance  and  general 
financial  brokerage  business  which  is  now  a  part  of  the  above  mentioned  company 
and  to  which  Mr.  Frazier  gives  his  personal  attention. 

On  the  21  st  day  of  August,  1907,  in  Vancouver,  Mr.  Frazier  was  united  in 
marriage  to  Miss  Margaret  L.  McNair,  a  daughter  of  David  and  Mary  Jane  Mc- 
Nair. They  have  one  son,  Percy,  Jr.  Mr.  Frazier  is  a  member  of  the  Presby- 
terian church  and  he  belongs  to  Southern  Cross  Lodge,  A.  F.  &  A.  M. ;  Pacific 
Chapter,  R.  A.  M. ;  and  Columbia  Preceptory,  A.  &  A.  S.  R.  The  nature  of  his 
recreation  is  indicated  in  the  fact  that  he  holds  membership  in  the  American  Club, 
of  which  he  was  one  of  the  organizers  and  is  at  present  a  director.  He  is  also 
a  member  of  the  Vancouver  Automobile  Club  and  the  Vancouver  Gun  Club.  He 
is  wide  awake,  alert  and  energetic,  attacking  everything  that  he  undertakes  with  a 
contagious  enthusiasm,  and  in  all  his  business  affairs  he  has  followed  constructive 
methods,  his  path  never  being  strewn  with  the  wreck  of  other's  failures.  He  rec- 
ognizes the  fact  that  there  is  room  and  opportunity  for  all  and  he  has  won  a 
liberal  clientage  by  proving  his  business  worth  and  his  enterprise. 


CAPTAIN  JOSEPH  MAYERS. 

Captain  Joseph  Mayers,  one  of  the  leading  coal  dealers  of  New  Westmintser 
and  one  of  the  city's  foremost  residents  and  public-spirited  citizens,  is  a  worthy 
native  son  of  British  Columbia,  his  birth  having  occurred  at  New  Westminster 
on  the  4th  of  August,  1870.  His  parents  were  Christian  and  Mary  Mayers,  the 
former  a  native  of  Germany  and  the  latter  of  British  Columbia.  Christian  May- 
ers was  one  of  the  pioneer  settlers  of  New  Westminster,  having  come  to  this 
province  from  his  native  country  as  a  young  man.  He  was  among  the  first  to 
make  his  way  to  the  Cariboo  country  in  search  of  gold  in  1858.  Subsequently 
he  located  in  Active  Pass  and  later  removed  to  New  Westminster.  While  his 


JOSEPH  MAYERS 


BRITISH    COLUMBIA  307 

son  Joseph  was  still  a  child  he  took  up  his  abode  at  Hastings  (now  Vancouver), 
on  the  site  of  which  stood  nothing  but  a  sawmill.  Later  he  returned  to  New 
Westminster  and  was  here  engaged  in  the  tugboat  and  towing  business  until 
called  to  his  ^  final  rest  on  March  22,  1891.  During  his  active  business  •  career 
he  had  been  connected  with  steamboat  interests  and  gained  a  wide  acquaintance 
and  enviable  reputation  in  that  connection. 

Joseph  Mayers  began  his  education  at  Hastings  (now  Vancouver)  and  com- 
pleted his  studies  in  the  public  schools  of  New  Westminster.  As  a  boy  he  had 
spent  a  great  deal  of  time  on  his  father's  boat  and  at  the  early  age  of  fifteen 
years  was  made  captain  of  a  tugboat  belonging  to  Alex  Ewen,  a  pioneer  in  the  fish 
canning  industry.  Subsequently  he  served  as  captain  of  the  boats  of  the  Brunette 
Saw  Mills  Company  and  later  acted  as  captain  of  the  boats  of  the  Royal  City 
Mills.  In  1898  he  left  the  employ  of  that  concern,  built  a  tugboat  in  associa- 
tion with  N.  R.  Preston  and  embarked  in  the  towing  business.  In  1901  Messrs. 
Mayers  and  Preston  organized  the  Westminster  Towing  &  Fishing  Company, 
now  operating  four  tugs.  Mr.  Mayers  was  made  president  of  the  company  and 
served  in  that  capacity  for  six  years,  on  the  expiration  of  which  period  he 
resigned  in  favor  of  Mr.  Preston,  who  is  now  the  chief  executive  officer,  our 
subject  being  a  member  of  the  board  of  directors.  In  1907,  in  association  with 
Mr.  Preston,  he  embarked  in  the  coal  business  and  two  years  later  purchased  his 
partner's  interest  therein  and  also  in  the  tugboat  which  they  had  built,  having 
since  conducted  both  enterprises  independently.  Success  has  attended  his  efforts 
in  these  connections  and  he  has  gained  a  well  merited  reputation  as  one  of  New 
Westminster's  leading  coal  dealers  and  prominent  citizens. 

On  the  8th  of  August,  1895,  Captain  Mayers  was  united  in  marriage  to  Miss 
Margaret  Taylor,  a  daughter  of  James  Taylor,  who  was  one  of  the  pioneers  of 
British  Columbia,  coming  from  Scotland  to  this  province  for  the  Hudson's  Bay 
Company.  Captain  and  Mrs.  Mayers  have  five  children,  namely :  J.  C.  Francis, 
Margaret  Catherine,  Joseph  G.,  Howard  C.  and  Edward  Wallace,  all  at  home. 

Captain  Mayers  is  a  liberal  in  his  political  views  and  is  one  of  the  pilot  com- 
missioners under  the  Dominion  government.  He  belongs  to  the  Native  Sons  of 
British  Columbia  and  the  Westminster  Club  and  in  fraternal  circles  is  well  known 
as  a  member  of  Fraser  Lodge,  No.  3,  Ancient  Order  of  United  Workmen,  and 
New  Westminster  Lodge,  No.  854,  Loyal  Order  of  Moose.  He  attends  the  serv- 
ices and  contributes  to  the  support  of  the  Church  of  England,  to  which  his  wife 
belongs.  They  are  well  known  and  highly  esteemed  throughout  the  province, 
the  circle  of  their  friends  being  almost  coextensive  with  the  circle  of  their 
acquaintances. 

JOHN  SPURGEON  STEEVES. 

In  a  rapidly  growing  city  there  is  splendid  opportunity  for  a  real-estate  man 
and  he  who  can  see  and  utilize  advantages  as  they  arise  has  excellent  chance  to 
win  success.  Mr.  Steeves  is  numbered  among  those  who  are  devoting  their  ener- 
gies to  real-estate  dealing  and  in  this  connection  has  negotiated  a  number  of  im- 
portant realty  transfers.  He  was  born  in  Kings  county,  New  Brunswick,  Septem- 
ber 26,  1878,  a  son  of  Gideon  and  Rebecca  (Brown)  Steeves,  representatives  of  a 
United  Empire  Loyalist  family  that  was  originally  founded  in  Massachusetts,  but 
on  the  proclamation  of  American  independence,  remaining  loyal  to  the  crown, 
came  to  Canada. 

In  the  public  schools  of  New  Brunswick,  John  Spurgeon  Steeves  pursued 
his  education,  and  after  putting  aside  his  text-books  turned  his  attention  to  agri- 
cultural pursuits.  He  continued  to  follow  farming  in  New  Brunswick  until  April, 
1907,  and  in  the  following  August  came  to  Vancouver  and  entered  the  real-estate 
field,  in  which  he  has  since  operated.  For  about  three  months  he  was  in  partner- 
ship with  E.  A.  Duke  under  the  firm  style  of  Duke  &  Steeves  in  1910,  but  since 


308  BRITISH    COLUMBIA 

the  dissolution  of  that  partnership  Mr.  Steeves  has  been  alone.  His  investments 
are  principally  in  local  real  estate  and  he  has  become  the  owner  of  valuable  prop- 
erty here.  He  is  thoroughly  conversant  with  the  real  estate  that  is  upon  the 
market,  is  an  expert  in  the  valuation  of  property,  and  has  negotiated  many  im- 
portant transfers  which  have  been  satisfactory  alike  to  him  and  to  his  clients. 

Mr.  Steeves  was  a  member  of  the  Eighth  Hussars  Light  Cavalry.  His  political 
faith  is  that  of  the  liberal  party  and  his  religious  belief  that  of  the  Baptist  church. 
He  holds  membership  with  the  Orange  order  and  with  the  Modern  Woodmen  of 
America.  He  is  interested  in  all  the  questions  and  problems  of  the  day  that  have 
to  do  with  the  upbuilding  of  the  city  or  with  the  welfare  of  the  province,  and  his 
influence  can  always  be  counted  upon  as  a  factor  on  the  side  of  public  progress. 


JOHN  HOWE  CARLISLE. 

It  is  only  when  a  crisis  arises  calling  forth  the  strenuous  effort  of  a  well  organ- 
ized fire  department  that  the  majority  of  people  stop  to  think  of  how  important 
is  the  service  rendered  by  the  fire  fighters  of  a  community  and  how  necessary  it 
is  to  have  at  their  head  a  man  capable,  cool  and  resourceful.  Such  a  man  Van- 
couver has  found  in  John  Howe  Carlisle,  who  since  1888  has  been  chief  of  the 
regular  department  and  held  the  same  position  with  the  volunteer  force  from 
December,  1886.  He  was  born  November  4,  1858,  in  Albert  county,  New  Bruns- 
wick, and  pursued  a  public-school  education  while  spending  his  youthful  days  in 
the  home  of  his  parents,  Theodore  and  Jane  Carlisle.  After  leaving  school  he 
removed  westward  and  for  three  months  was  a  resident  of  Idaho.  He  then 
went  to  Seattle,  Washington,  where  he  remained  for  two  years,  and  in  March, 
1886,  he  arrived  in  Vancouver,  where  he  has  since  made  his  home.  In  Decem- 
ber of  the  same  year  he  was  appointed  to  the  position  of  chief  of  the  Vancouver 
fire  department,  which  was  then  a  volunteer  organization,  and  in  1888,  when 
this  was  changed  to  a  paid  department,  he  was  chosen  chief  and  has  continued 
in  the  position  to  the  present  time,  or  for  a  period  of  a  quarter  of  a  century, 
and  is  now  the  oldest  fire  chief  in  point  of  service  in  Canada.  When  chief  of 
the  volunteers  Mr.  Carlisle  was  engaged  in  the  trucking  business,  but  upon  the 
organization  of  the  fire  force  as  a  city  department  he  gave  up  his  activities  along 
that  line.  The  first  fire  department  was  founded  in  Vancouver  in  May,  1886, 
but  had  no  equipment  when  the  town  burned.  After  becoming  chief  of  the 
regular  force  Mr.  Carlisle  set  himself  immediately  to  the  task  of  perfecting  a 
splendid  organization  with  excellent  equipment  in  the  way  of  fire-fighting  appa- 
ratus, and  the  men  under  him  are  most  loyal,  recognizing  in  him  one  who  is  cap- 
able of  directing  their  labors  to  the  best  advantage  when  emergency  demands. 
Vancouver  may  be  said  to  be  the  first  place  on  this  continent  to  have  adopted 
the  automobile  system  at  a  time  when  in  other  places  squad  wagons  only  were 
used.  Visitors  from  all  over,  including  the  United  States,  came  here  to  see  the 
new  system  in  operation.  Continually  the  equipment  was  improved,  and  in  1908 
the  equipment  for  the  fire  department  was  two  hose  wagons  and  a  chemical 
engine  of  automobile  type,  and  these  innovations  proved  so  satisfactory  that  the 
city  has  since  enlarged  its  equipment  to  its  present  size,  some  of  the  engines 
having  as  high  a  speed  as  sixty  miles  per  hour.  The  present  equipment  is  com- 
posed of  eighteen  pieces,  including  hose  wagons,  chemical  engines,  aerial  trucks 
and  one  self-propelling  steam  fire  engine.  The  aerial  trucks  reach  eighty-five  feet 
and  to  each  are  assigned  eight  men,  but  as  low  as  two  men  can  handle  one  of  the 
trucks.  Mr.  Carlisle  has  done  everything  in  his  power  to  make  this  splendid  equip- 
ment effective  and  on  numerous  occasions  has  proven  his  extraordinary  ability  in 
handling  dangerous  situations.  He  is  cool  and  collected  in  times  of  excitement, 
never  losing  sight  of  what  might  be  termed  the  strategic  point  in  winning  a 
victory  over  the  destructive  element. 


JOHN  H.  CARLISLE 


BRITISH    COLUMBIA  311 

On  the  1 5th  of  March,  1887,  in  Seattle,  Washington,  Mr.  Carlisle  was  united 
in  marriage  to  Miss  Laura  McRae,  a  daughter  of  Alexander  and  Elinor  McRae. 
Their  children  are  Dora,  Frank,  Ethel,  Kenneth,  Walter,  Ella,  Verona,  Jack 
and  Florence.  The  eldest  daughter  is  the  wife  of  A.  S.  McDonald,  of  Vancouver, 
and  the  others  are  all  yet  at  home. 

Chief  Carlisle  is  a  member  of  Acacia  Lodge,  No.  22,  A.  F.  &  A.  M.,  of 
Vancouver,  and  also  belongs  to  the  Loyal  Order  of  Orange.  He  gives  evidence 
of  his  interest  in  the  material  expansion  of  the  city  by  his  membership  in  the 
Commercial  Club.  A  man  of  vigorous  physique  and  one  who  realizes  the  im- 
portance of  a  healthy  body  as  a  habitat  for  a  healthy  mind,  he  is  a  lover  of  the 
out-of-doors  and  finds  recreation  from  his  arduous  duties  in  outdoor  sports, 
such  as  hunting  and  fishing.  His  value  as  a  public  officer  and  as  the  head  of 
one  of  the  most  important  departments  of  the  city  government,  engaged  in  the 
prevention  of  destruction  to  property  and  disaster  to  human  life,  is  readily 
recognized  and  his  fitness  for  his  position  is  of  value  as  a  public  asset. 


ROBERT  WETMORE  HANNINGTON. 

One  of  the  most  able  barristers  in  Vancouver  and  one  of  the  most  public-spir- 
ited and  progressive  men  in  the  city  is  Robert  Wetmore  Hannington,  practicing  at 
the  bar  of  British  Columbia  as  a  member  of  the  firm  of  Harris,  Bull,  Hannington  & 
•  Mason.  He  was  born  in  Dorchester,  New  Brunswick,  May  22,  1868,  and  is  a  son 
of  Hon.  Daniel  L.  and  Emily  M.  (Wetmore)  Hannington,  the  former  late  premier 
of  New  Brunswick  and  senior  judge  of  the  supreme  court  of  that  province. 

Robert  W.  Hannington  acquired  his  early  education  in  the  grammar  schools 
of  Dorchester  and  afterward  entered  the  University  of  New  Brunswick,  from 
which  he  was  graduated  in  1888  with  the  degree  of  B.  A.  Having  determined  upon 
a  legal  career,  after  three  years  study  in  the  office  of  his  father,  he  became  a 
student  at  Dalhousie  University  in  Halifax,  Nova  Scotia,  attending  in  1891  and 
1892,  and  in  the  latter  year  was  called  to  the  New  Brunswick  bar.  Shortly  after 
he  practiced  at  St.  John  for  five  years  and  in  1897  moved  to  Nelson,  British  Colum- 
bia, where  until  1908  he  engaged  in  general  practice,  first  with  S.  Taylor  as  a 
member  of  the  firm  of  Taylor  &  Hannington  and  later  with  Judge  Galliher  under 
the  firm  name  of  Galliher  &  Hannington.  In  1908  Mr.  Hannington  moved  to  Van- 
couver and  the  firm  of  Russell,  Russell  &  Hannington  was  formed  in  the  city,  the 
association  continuing  until  1911,  when  Mr.  Hannington  returned  to  Nelson. 
However,  he  remained  only  three  months  and  then  returning  to  Vancouver,  aided 
in  the  organization  of  the  present  firm  of  Harris,  Bull,  Hannington  &  Mason. 
This  is  one  of  the  strongest  law  firms  in  the  city,  all  of  its  members  being  able, 
brilliant  and  resourceful  men,  and  it  is  connected  through  an  extensive  and  repre- 
sentative patronage  with  a  great  deal  of  notable  litigation.  In  Vancouver  Mr. 
Hannington  is  known  as  a  strong  and  able  practitioner,  well  versed  in  the  under- 
lying principles  of  law  and  possessing  the  incisive  and  analytical  qualities  of  mind 
necessary  to  make  his  knowledge  practical  and  effective.  He  has  won  a  number 
of  notable  legal  victories  and  has  been  carried  forward  into  important  relations 
with  the  public  life  of  the  city,  his  signal  ability  gaining  him  recognition  in  official 
circles.  In  1912  he  was  appointed  commissioner  for  the  government  to  investigate 
the  conditions  existing  in  the  Vancouver  General  Hospital  and  in  the  same  year 
was  appointed  counsel  to  revise  the  Vancouver  city  by-laws.  In  both  of  these  im- 
portant capacities  he  accomplished  the  work  in  hand  with  thoroughness  and  dis- 
patch, adding  something  to  the  respect  and  esteem  in  which  his  name  is  held  in 
«ancouver. 
On  the  1 6th  of  August,  1911,  in  St.  John,  New  Brunswick,  Mr.  Hannington 
as  united  in  marriage  to  Miss  Louisa  M.  Skinner,  a  daughter  of  Robert  C.  and 
Elizabeth  C.  Skinner,  the  former  for  several  years  judge  of  the  probate  court  of 
St.  John.  Mr.  Hannington  is  a  member  of  the  Anglican  church  and  fraternally 

Vol.  Ill— 11 


312  BRITISH    COLUMBIA 

is  connected  with  the  Independent  Order  of  Odd  Fellows.  He  belongs  to  the 
Vancouver  Club  and  to  the  Press  Club  in  Vancouver  and  is  well  known  in  the 
affairs  of  the  Nelson  Club  of  Nelson.  His  political  allegiance  is  given  to  the  con- 
servative party  and  while  he  is  not  an  active  politician  he  is  essentially  public- 
spirited,  interested  in  the  welfare  of  the  city  and  always  eager  to  do  his  utmost 
to  promote  civic  growth.  In  a  profession  where  advancement  depends  entirely 
upon  superior  merit  and  ability  he  has  made  steady  and  rapid  progress  and  his 
record  is  a  credit  to  the  bar  of  British  Columbia  which  numbers  among  its  repre- 
sentatives so  many  able  and  brilliant  men. 


BEACH  ADONIJAH  LASELLE. 

In  the  history  of  Beach  Adonijah  Laselle  we  have  the  record  of  one  who 
has  utilized  the  thrift  and  enterprise  which  have  ever  characterized  New  Eng- 
land's sons  in  the  development  of  the  splendid  natural  resources  of  the  Pacific 
northwest.  Opportunities  which  others  have  heedlessly  passed  by  he  has  utilized, 
and  his  practical  experience  and  native  intelligence  have  been  of  incalculable 
benefit  to  this  section  of  the  country.  A  native  of  Vermont,  Mr.  Laselle  was 
born  at  St.  Albans  Point,  Franklin  county,  July  n,  1870,  and  his  parents,  Arthur 
and  Ellen  M.  (Hathaway)  Laselle,  were  also  natives  of  that  state.  The  father 
is  now  a  retired  farmer  of  Franklin  county,  where  he  has  spent  his  entire  life. 
His  wife  died  in  early  womanhood  during  the  infancy  of  their  son  Beach. 

In  the  public  and  high  schools  of  St.  Albans,  Beach  A.  Laselle  pursued  his  edu- 
cation until  graduated  with  the  class  of  1887.  He  afterward  spent  a  year  as  a 
clerk  in  the  postoffice  of  his  native  city  and  at  the  end  of  that  time,  or  in  August 
1888,  went  to  Anacortes,  Washington,  where  he  secured  a  clerkship  in  a  general 
store,  remaining  there  until  the  late  fall  of  1889.  During  his  residence  in  Ana- 
cortes he  had  dealt  to  a  limited  extent  in  real  estate  in  the  growing  and  promising 
towns  of  Seahome,  Fairhaven  and  Whatcom,  all  of  which  now  form  a  part  of 
the  city  of  Bellingham,  Washington.  In  the  fall  of  1889  Anacortes  entered  upon 
a  boom  and  Mr.  Laselle  opened  a  real-estate  office  in  what  had  hitherto  been  a 
trading  post  and  steamboat  landing.  His  was  the  first  real-estate  office  there  and 
he  conducted  his  business  in  a  tent,  having  as  a  partner  E.  K.  Hiatt.  From  the 
beginning  he  was  very  successful  throughout  the  period  of  the  boom,  negotiating 
many  important  realty  transfers.  In  May,  1890,  he  went  to  the  mines  at  Galena, 
Washington,  in  Silver  creek,  where  he  did  lode  mining,  taking  up  several  claims 
in  that  region.  Locating  there,  he  also  took  some  contracts  for  assessment  work 
on  nearby  claims  and  a  little  later,  in  partnership  with  William  H.  Roberts,  he 
opened  a  general  store  at  Galena  in  the  spring  of  1894.  Owing  to  the  slump  in 
silver  ore,  the  camp  at  Galena  died  out  and  Mr.  Laselle  disposed  of  everything 
that  was  salable  and  left  a  considerable  amount  of  goods  on  the  shelves  of  his 
store,  as  it  would  cost  more  to  move  the  stock  than  it  was  worth.  He  left  there 
with  Edward  Stevens  and  went  to  Wenatchee,  Washington,  where  they  pur- 
chased some  pack  horses,  fitted  up  an  outfit  and  started  upon  a  prospecting  and 
mining  trip  in  the  Similkameen  district,  going  through  the  mountains  at  the  head 
of  the  Pasaytan  river,  a  branch  of  the  Similkumeen,  to  the  town  of  Princeton. 
That  was  in  the  year  of  the  big  floods  of  the  rivers  of  British  Columbia,  and  Mr. 
Laselle  had  great  difficulty  in  crossing  the  creeks  and  rivers  which  he  encountered 
on  his  journey.  The  town  of  Silver  was  washed  away  before  their  very  eyes. 
They  had  planned  to  cross  to  the  town  the  night  before  but  failing  to  secure  a 
canoe  had  camped  over  night.  In  that  time  the  rising  river  had  so  swollen  that 
at  daylight  the  houses  began  to  fall  one  by  one,  and  were  carried  away  and  the 
whole  town  was  destroyed.  While  on  the  trip  their  food  supply  became  ex- 
hausted and  they  were  two  and  a  half  days  without  food  of  any  kind  until  Mr. 
Laselle  shot  a  fawn,  which  supplied  them  with  fresh  meat  to  complete  the  trip 
to  Princeton.  They  stopped  at  Princeton  and  there,  by  chance,  met  a  pioneer 


BEACH  A.  LASELLE 


BRITISH    COLUMBIA  315 

who  told  them  such  glowing  tales  of  the  Cariboo  that  they  decided  to  make  their 
way  to  that  district.  They  immediately  secured  new  supplies  and  set  forth  on  a 
journey  that  meant  the  lengthening  of  their  trail  three  hundred  and  fifty  miles. 
They  left  Princeton  with  two  pack  horses,  both  heavily  laden,  so  that  they  had 
to  walk.  In  July  they  reached  Harper's  Camp  on  the  Horse  Fly  river,'  spent  a 
few  days  there  and  proceeded  to  Quesnelle  Forks,  and  thence  on  to  Caribou  lake. 
At  Keithley  creek  they  found  George  Veith,  a  pioneer  who  was  conducting  a 
trading  post,  where  they  secured  fresh  supplies.  They  then  crossed  the  lake 
and  spent  two  months  in  prospecting  the  creek's  tributary  to  Caribou  lake.  Mr. 
Laselle  then  went  to  Barkerville,  while  Mr.  Stevens  remained  at  Keithley  creek. 
After  a  week  the  former  returned  and  advised  Mr.  Stevens  to  go  to  Barkerville 
to  spend  the  winter,  which  he  did.  Mr.  Laselle  then  planned  his  return  trip  to 
Washington,  where  he  had  business  interests  that  required  his  attention.  In  his 
absence  from  Keithley  creek  their  two  horses  had  wandered  away  from  camp  and 
had  not  yet  been  found  on  his  return.  He  started  out  on  his  return  trip  and 
after  walking  about  sixty  miles  found  both  horses.  He  sold  one  of  them  and 
proceeded  to  ride  the  other.  For  seven  hundred  miles  he  traveled  on  horseback, 
having  only  one  blanket,  which  he  used  during  the  day  as  a  saddle  blanket  and  at 
night  as  a  sleeping  blanket.  He  had  a  frying  pan  tied  to  his  saddle  and  he  pur- 
chased horse  feed  from  the  Indians  and  settlers  whom  he  met  en  route.  His 
course  was  through  the  valleys  of  the  Similkumeen  and  Columbia  rivers  to  the 
town  of  Wenatchee,  from  which  point  he  continued  by  train  to  Seattle.  When  he 
crossed  the  Columbia  river  at  Central  Ferry  he  learned  that  on  the  following  day 
there  was  to  be  a  sale  of  wild  Oregon  horses,  fine  animals  of  about  eleven  hundred 
pounds  each.  He  camped  there  over  night  and  attended  the  sale,  purchasing  four 
head  of  horses,  none  of  which  had  ever  had  as  much  as  a  rope  on  them.  The 
highest  price  that  he  paid  for  any  of  them  was  four  dollars  and  fifty  cents.  He 
left  these  horses  on  a  ranch  near  Central  Ferry  until  the  following  spring.  In 
December,  1894,  he  arrived  in  Seattle,  spent  the  winter  there  and  closed  out  all 
his  interests  in  Washington  with  the  object  of  making  British  Columbia  his  per- 
manent home.  In  April,  1895,  he  returned  to  Central  Ferry,  where  he  spent  a 
few  days  breaking  his  new  horses.  He  then  proceeded  to  Barkerville,  where  he 
met  his  partner  of  the  previous  year,  and  they  struck  out  from  there  on  a  prospect- 
ing and  mining  trip  that  lasted  five  years.  They  worked  in  all  directions  and  on 
several  occasions  went  far  north.  In  1899  Mr.  Laselle  discovered  the  China  creek 
gold  mines  and  in  1901  located  the  Nugget  Gulch  gold  mine.  He  immediately 
gave  his  undivided  time  to  the  development  of  those  properties  and  now  has  them 
equipped  with  the  most  modern  machinery  for  hydraulic  mining,  working  a  force 
of  men  at  each  mine  during  the  season.  Both  of  these  properties  are  within  a 
few  miles  of  Barkerville  and  both  have  produced  some  beautiful  specimens  of  ore, 
Mr.  Laselle  having  in  his  possession  the  largest  nugget  ever  taken  from  China 
creek  mine.  It  contains  pure  gold  to  the  value  of  two  hundred  and  fifty  dollars 
and  a  very  little  quartz. 

Mr.  Laselle  is  an  entertaining  conversationalist  and  tells  many  thrilling  and  in- 
teresting tales  of  his  life  in  Cariboo,  all  of  which  would  be  thoroughly  enjoyed 
could  we  give  space  to  them  in  these  pages.  In  1909  he  placed  a  man  in  charge 
of  the  mines  and  came  to  Vancouver  to  make  this  city  his  home.  In  that  year  he 
organized  the  Northern  Development  Company,  Ltd.,  of  which  he  is  president 
and  manager.  In  January,  1910,  he  bought  a  large  acreage  and  placed  on  the 
market  the  town  site  of  South  Fort  George,  which  had  already  become  the  business 
center  of  the  Fort  George  district.  Mr.  Laselle  was  the  first  man  to  offer  the 
public  the  opportunity  to  invest  in  this  prosperous  new  town,  which  is  situated  in 
the  heart  of  what  will  soon  be  one  of  British  Columbia's  richest  commercial  and 
agricultural  regions.  He  is  called  the  father  of  South  Fort  George,  and  the 
development,  growth  and  prosperity  of  the  district  can  be  largely  attributed  to 
his  enterprising  efforts.  The  Northern  Development  Company  also  acts  as  agent 
for  Fraser  and  Nechaco  valley  farm  lands,  and  they  are  Pacific  coast  agents  for 
the  Grand  Trunk  Pacific  Railway  town  site — Fraser  Lake,  British  Columbia 
Each  forward  step  that  Mr.  Laselle  has  made  has  brought  him  of  a  broader  outlook 


316  BRITISH    COLUMBIA 

and  wider  opportunities,  and  his  efforts  have  at  all  times  been  a  character  that 
have  contributed  to  general  growth  and  development.  He  was  one  of  the  organ- 
izers of  the  Pacific  Lime  Company,  Ltd.,  which  was  formed  in  1910  and  of  which 
he  is  now  the  secretary  and  treasurer.  Their  plant,  which  is  the  largest  in  the 
province,  is  located  at  Blubber  Bay,  on  the  north  end  of  Texada  island.  The  pro- 
duction is  approximately  eight  thousand  barrels  per  month  and  they  supply  three 
fourths  of  all  the  lime  used  in  British  Columbia.  Mr.  Laselle  is  also  president 
of  the  Compressed  Fuel  Company,  the  owners,  patentees  and  manufacturers  of 
a  machine  that  utilizes  the  waste  from  saw  and  cane  mills,  taking  the  refuse  which 
has  heretofore  been  a  source  of  trouble  and  expense  to  dispose  of  and  putting  it 
into  the  form  of  commercial  fuel  that  is  superior  to  coal  in  cost,  heat  per  ton,  and 
cleanliness.  Thus  along  many  lines  have  the  enterprising  efforts  of  Mr.  Laselle 
constituted  an  important  force  in  business  activity  and  progress,  and  his  ability 
and  energy  have  constituted  the  foundation  upon  which  he  has  reached  the  high 
plane  of  affluence  that  he  now  occupies. 

In  New  York  city,  on  the  i8th  of  April,  1907,  Mr.  Laselle  was  married  to 
Miss  Theodora  Evelyn  Mason,  of  Greenwich,  Connecticut,  a  granddaughter  of  the 
celebrated  surgeon,  Dr.  Mason,  of  Brooklyn,  New  York,  and  a  descendant 
of  a  very  old  and  prominent  family  of  Greenwich.  They  have  one  son,  Beach 
Adonijah,  Jr.,  three  years  of  age.  Mr.  Laselle  is  a  conservative,  and 
while  in  the  Cariboo  took  a  very  active  part  in  politics.  He  holds  membership 
with  the  Camp  Fire  Club  of  America,  a  game  and  hunt  club  which  was  organized 
in  New  York  city  some  years  ago.  He  was  present  at  its  first  meeting  and  is  a 
charter  member  in  this  club,  which  has  a  limited  membership  of  two  hundred  and 
is  comprised  of  many  of  America's  celebrities.  He  is  the  only  member  from  Brit- 
ish Columbia.  Mr.  Laselle's  life  has  been  one  filled  with  romance  and  adventure. 
Born  in  New  England,  during  his  early  youth  he  went  alone  to  the  Pacific  coast, 
has  spent  winters  in  the  far  north  of  British  Columbia,  going  for  days  at  a  time 
without  food,  depending  entirely  upon  the  trap  and  gun.  He  has  been  exposed 
to  the  ravages  of  malaria  and  fevers  of  South  America  and  he  has  met  all  of  the 
hardships  and  experiences  of  life  on  the  frontier  and  in  the  mining  camps.  He  is 
a  member  of  the  American  Institute  of  Mining  Engineers  and  is  an  acknowledged 
authority  in  British  Columbia  on  mining  in  all  its  branches.  His  services  have 
been  employed  on  many  occasions  to  examine  and  report  upon  mining  properties 
in  various  parts  of  British  Columbia,  California,  Nevada,  Georgia  and  Alabama, 
and  in  the  winter  of  1905-06  he  spent  five  months  in  investigations  in  South  Amer- 
ica on  the  headwaters  of  the  Amazon  river.  •  Of  notably  broad  mind  and  sound 
judgment,  of  indefatigable  energy  and  enterprise,  his  achievements  are  those  of  a 
man  who  has  wisely  used  his  time,  talents  and  opportunities.  From  each  experi- 
ence of  life  he  has  gained  valuable  lessons,  and  there  is  no  one  who  could  speak 
more  entertainingly  and  interestingly  concerning  that  period  in  which  exploration 
and  research  were  bringing  to  light  the  natural  resources  of  the  country. 


CHARLES  JOHN  SOUTH. 

Charles  John  South,  deputy  police  magistrate,  was  born  at  Melbourne,  Aus- 
tralia, August  2,  1850,  his  parents  being  George  Bennett  and  Sara  (Percy)  South. 
His  education  was  acquired  in  the  state  schools  of  Victoria,  Australia,  and  he 
followed  the  vocation  of  an  accountant  until  he  entered  into  active  public  service. 
The  year  1896  witnessed  his  arrival  in  British  Columbia,  and  from  1902  until 
1912  he  was  superintendent  under  the  Children's  Protective  Act  of  British  Colum- 
bia. In  1901  he  became  superintendent  of  the  Children's  Home  and  as  such  proved 
most  capable,  displaying  sound  practical  judgment  and  broad  humanitarianism  in 
shaping  the  policy  and  promoting  the  interests  of  the  institution  and  of  those  in  its 
charge.  For  many  years  he  was  honorary  representative  of  the  Royal  Humane 
Society  of  London,  England,  and  other  important  service  performed  by  him  was 


BRITISH    COLUMBIA  317 

that  of  library  commissioner  in  Vancouver  for  a  period  of  two  years.  He  was 
again  called  to  public  office  when  made  justice  of  the  peace  for  British  Columbia, 
and  in  November,  1910,  was  appointed  deputy  police  magistrate  for  the  city  of 
Vancouver. 

Mr.  South  was  united  in  marriage  to  Miss  E.  B.  Unthank,  a  native  of  York- 
shire, England,  and  they  have  become  the  parents  of  four  sons  and  two  daughters, 
Percy,  F.  Leslie,  Norman,  A.  Lyndon,  May  and  Woodstock.  The  first  three  are 
married,  while  the  younger  three  are  at  home.  Mr.  South  belongs  to  the  Masonic 
fraternity  .and  is  always  loyal  to  the  beneficent  teachings  of  the  craft.  He  is  an 
earnest  and  active  member  of  the  Methodist  church  and  a  teacher  in  the  Sunday 
school.  His  life  has  been  actuated  by  high  and  honorable  principles,  having  their 
root  in  recognition  of  the  duties  and  obligations  of  man  to  his  fellow  man  and  to 
his  Maker.  His  kindly  spirit,  patience,  geniality  and  ready  understanding  splen- 
didly qualified  him  for  the  work  which  he  did  as  superintendent  of  the  Children's 
Home  and  for  his  labors  in  other  connections,  and  as  police  magistrate  he  often 
embraces  his  opportunity  for  tempering  justice  with  mercy,  thus  calling  out  the 
manhood  of  the  individual. 


ROBERT  WILLIAM  FORD. 

Robert  William  Ford,  manager  of  the  Vancouver  Gas  Company,  to  which  posi- 
tion he  was  appointed  in  December,  1912,  was  born  September  13,  1885,  at 
Stockton-on-Tees,  England,  his  parents  being  William  and  Elizabeth  Ford,  the 
former  a  professional  consulting  gas  engineer.  In  the  public  schools  of  his  native 
city  the  son  pursued  his  early  education  and  afterward  attended  Leeds  University, 
pursuing  a  course  in  the  gas  engineering  department  for  several  years,  and  thus 
receiving  comprehensive  technical  training  and  preparation  for  the  line  of  labor 
to  which  he  has  devoted  his  life.  After  leaving  the  university  he  became  connected 
with  the  Middlesborough  (England)  corporation  in  the  line  of  his  profession  and 
remained  in  that  connection  for  several  years,  at  the  same  time  working  with  his 
father  as  consulting  gas  engineer.  Attracted  by  the  growing  opportunities  of  the 
new  world,  he  came  to  Vancouver  in  1910  to  take  the  position  of  assistant  manager 
of  the  Vancouver  Gas  Company,  having  been  appointed  to  the  position  while  in 
London,  where  are  located  the  headquarters  of  the  company.  He  came  at  once  to 
this  city,  where  he  has  since  remained,  and  his  ability  won  him  promotion  to  the 
position  of  manager  in  December,  1912.  He  is  now  ably  and  faithfully  and 
promptly  discharging  the  important  duties  which  devolve  upon  him  in  this  con- 
nection, his  promotion  signifying  the  acceptability  of  his  service  to  the  company. 

Mr.  Ford  is  a  member  of  the  Canadian  and  Rotary  Clubs  and  his  life  principles 
have  their  root  in  his  religious  faith,  which  finds  expression  in  his  membership  in 
St.  John's  Presbyterian  church.  He  has  become  well  known  during  his  residence 
in  Vancouver,  gaining  many  friends  here  and  winning  the  warm  regard  of  those 
with  whom  he  has  been  brought  in  contact. 


FREDERICK  STEELE  JONES. 

A  worthy  son  of  a  worthy  sire,  Frederick  Steele  Jones  occupies  today  an 
iportant  position  in  the  commercial  life  of  Vancouver  as  head  of  the  firm  of 
C.  H.  Jones  &  Son,  Limited,  which  was  founded  by  his  father.  The  firm  is  en- 
gaged in  the  manufacture  and  sale  of  awnings,  tents  and  sails  and  its  trade  con- 
nections are  such  that  it  deserves  to  be  numbered  among  the  foremost  establish- 
ments of  its  kind  in  the  province.  Frederick  S.  Jones  was  born  in  St.  John,  New 
Brunswick,  March  16,  1879,  a  son  of  Charles  Henry  and  Anna  Steele  (Calbraith) 
Jones.  The  father  came  to  Vancouver  in  the  fall  of  1886,  shortly  after  the  his- 


II 


318  BRITISH    COLUMBIA 

torical  fire,  and  here  established  himself  in  the  tent  and  awning  business  as  well  as 
that  of  sailmaker,  also  handling  a  general  line  of  canvas  goods.  He  became  well 
and  favorably  known  in  the  commercial  world  of  Vancouver,  which  city  he  made 
his  home  and  business  field  until  his  death,  July  8,  1912. 

Frederick  S.  Jones  .received  his  education  in  the  public  schools  of  Vancouver 
and  after  laying  aside  his  text-books  entered  his  father's  business,  becoming  thor- 
oughly acquainted  with  its  methods  and  details.  In  1901  he  was  taken  into  part- 
nership, the  name  of  the  firm  becoming  C.  H.  Jones  &  Son.  This  style  is  still  used 
by  the  son,  although  the  father  is  now  deceased,  the  firm  now  being  incorporated 
with  the  word  "Limited"  added  thereto.  The  office  and  factory  of  the  firm 
is  located  at  No.  1 10  Alexander  street,  Vancouver,  and  there  they  not  only  handle 
their  own  goods  but  also  imported  cotton  ducks  and  drillings,  Egyptian  sail  cloths, 
waterproof  silks,  oiled  clothing,  parafine  duck  clothing,  waterproof  canvas  and 
camp  furniture.  Their  goods  are  distributed  through  the  wholesale  trade  as  well 
as  in  the  retail.  Mr.  Jones  is  principally  engaged  in  the  extension  of  his  important 
business  connection  but  also  has  real-estate  interests. 

At  New  Westminster,  on  October  15,  1901,  Frederick  S.  Jones  married  Norma 
Christina,  a  daughter  of  William  and  Augusta  Sword,  and  they  have  become  the 
parents  of  one  child,  Ira  Steele  Jones.  During  the  time  of  the  Fenian  raid  Mr. 
Sword  gave  an  example  of  his  patriotism  as  a  member  of  the  volunteers  and 
recently  in  commemoration  of  his  services  received  a  medal  from  the  Dominion 
government  and  also  a  grant  of  one  hundred  dollars,  which  was  given  to  each  of 
the  volunteers.  The  religious  faith  of  Mr.  Jones  is  that  of  the  Methodist  denomi- 
nation and  politically  he  is  a  conservative,  giving  stanch  support  to  his  party's 
candidates.  One  of  the  progressive  business  men  of  Vancouver,  Mr.  Jones  has 
not  only  attained  to  individual  prosperity  but  has  been  a  factor  in  promoting  com- 
mercial expansion  and  is  interested  in  all  measures  intended  to  advance  the  gen- 
eral welfare. 


HARRY  ALLEN  BELYEA. 

Harry  Allen  Belyea,  of  the  firm  of  H.  A.  Belyea  &  Company  of  New  West- 
minster, is  successfully  engaged  in  business  as  a  dealer  in  coal  and  wood  and 
has  also  built  up  an  extensive  patronage  in  all  kinds  of  teaming  and  transfer 
work.  His  birth  occurred  in  Ashland,  Carleton  county,  New  Brunswick,  on  the 
8th  of  September,  1868,  his  parents  being  Henry  Albert  and  Millicent  (Nevers) 
Belyea,  who  spent  their  entire  lives  in  the  province  of  New  Brunswick.  In  early 
manhood  the  father  was  for  several  years  engaged  as  a  stage  driver  from  Wood- 
stock to  River  du  Loup,  but  subsequently  turned  his  attention  to  agricultural 
pursuits,  following  farming  until  called  to  his  final  rest  in  1908,  when  eighty-two 
years  of  age.  His  wife  passed  away  at  the  age  of  sixty-eight  years. 

Harry  Allen  Belyea  attended  the  country  schools  of  his  native  county  in  the 
acquirement  of  an  education.  In  1886,  only  a  few  days  prior  to  his  eighteenth 
birthday,  he  left  the  parental  roof  and  made  his  way  to  Emporium,  Pennsyl- 
vania, spending  about  a  year  in  the  lumber  woods.  Subsequently  he  went  to 
Menominee,  Michigan,  where  he  drove  a  team  in  the  lumber  woods  and  also 
engaged  in  river  driving.  At  the  end  of  eleven  months,  however,  he  went  west 
to  Tacoma,  Washington,  and  there  took  a  contract  to  cut  shingle  bolts  in 
association  with  George  T.  Reid,  being  thus  engaged  with  excellent  success  for 
about  eighteen  months.  In  the  spring  of  1890  he  came  to  British  Columbia  and 
secured  employment  as  a  driver  for  W.  E.  Dickinson,  a  truck  and  dray  man,  in 
whose  service  he  remained  for  about  three  years.  On  the  expiration  of  that 
period  he  accepted  a  position  with  Gilley  Brothers,  for  which  firm  he  drove 
for  about  six  years  and  was  then  appointed  foreman  of  their  extensive  team- 
ing operations.  After  about  three  years  spent  in  that  capacity,  he  resigned  the 
position  and  founded  the  firm  of  H.  A.  Belyea  &  Company,  his  partners  in  the 


HARRY  A.  BELYEA 


321 

enterprise  being  Thomas  Stoddart  and  Rupert  Fulton,  who  are  still  associated 
in  business  with  him.  The  newly  organized  concern  bought  out  the  teaming 
business  of  Crane  Brothers  and  began  operations  on  their  own  account.  They 
embarked  in  the  coal  business  in  addition  to  teaming  and  are  now  among  the 
leading  coal  dealers  in  New  Westminster.  The  success  of  the  enterprise  is 
attributable  in  no  small  measure  to  the  excellent  management  of  Mr.  Belyea, 
who  is  a  man  of  sound  judgment  and  keen  discernment  in  business  affairs.  He 
deserves  great  credit  for  what  he  has  accomplished,  having  worked  his  way 
steadily  upward  from  a  humble  position  in  the  business  world  to  one  of  pros- 
perity and  prominence. 

On  the  26th  of  July,  1892,  Mr.  Belyea  was  united  in  marriage  to  Miss  Eliza- 
beth Stickney,  of  New  Westminster,  a  daughter  of  William  Stickney,  who  came 
to  British  Columbia  from  New  Brunswick  late  in  the  '8os.  Our  subject  and  his 
wife  have  one  son,  Frank  Percival,  of  Daysland,  Alberta.  Mr.  Belyea  belongs 
to  the  Westminster  Board  of  Trade  and  fraternally  is  identified  with  Royal  City 
Lodge,  No.  3,  I.  O.  O.  F.,  and  Granite  Lodge,  No.  6,  K.  P.  He  attends  and 
contributes  to  the  support  of  the  Baptist  church,  of  which  his  wife  is  a  devoted 
member.  They  are  widely  and  favorably  known  throughout  New  Westminster, 
having  won  the  unqualified  confidence  and  regard  of  all  with  whom  they  have 
come  in  contact  during  the  long  period  of  their  residence  here. 


ROBERT  J.  SPROTT. 

Undoubtedly  the  central  figure  in  educational  circles  of  British  Columbia  along 
commercial  lines  is  Robert  J.  Sprott,  president  of  the  Vancouver  Business  Insti- 
tute and  one  of  the  most  able  and  progressive  educators  in  the  province.  His  in- 
fluence, indeed,  extends  beyond  provincial  boundaries,  for  under  his  able  manage- 
ment the  school  of  which  he  is  at  the  head  has  become  the  second  largest  of  its 
kind  in  the  Dominion — a  worthy  memorial  to  the  constructive  intelligence,  the 
broad  and  scholarly  attainments  and  the  administrative  ability  of  the  man  who 
founded  it  and  who  controls  its  destinies.  Mr.  Sprott  has  devoted  practically  all 
of  his  active  career  to  educational  work  and,  constantly  following  high  ideals  and 
adhering  to  practical  modern  standards,  his  influence  has  been  felt  as  a  force  for 
progress  in  intellectual  circles  of  the  communities  where  he  has  made  his  home. 
He  was  born  in  Grey  county,  Ontario,  on  the  ist  of  March,  1873,  and  is  a  son 
of  Henry  and  Jane  (Morrison)  Sprott,  the  former  a  native  of  Quebec  and  the 
latter  of  Ontario.  On  both  sides  Mr.  Sprott  is  a  descendant  of  old  families,  the 
members  of  whjch  have  been  prominent  in  military  affairs,  the  paternal  ancestors 
having  been  officers  in  the  English  army  as  far  back  as  the  time  of  William  of 
Orange,  and  the  maternal  grandfather,  Robert  Morrison,  having  served  as  a  soldier 
in  the  Fenian  raid  in  Ontario.  The  parents  of  our  subject  resided  in  Grey  county, 
that  province,  until  the  spring  of  1909,  when  they  moved  to  Vancouver,  where  the 
father  is  now  living  in  retirement,  giving  supervision,  however,  to  his  large  farm- 
ing interests  in  Ontario. 

Robert  J.  Sprott  acquired  his  early  education  in  the  public  schools  of  his  native 
community  and  was  afterward  graduated  from  Toronto  University,  taking  honors 
in  modern  languages,  English  and  history.  After  spending  one  year  on  the  con- 
tinent of  Europe  perfecting  himself  in  his  chosen  branches  he  entered  Ontario 
Normal  College  and  there  spent  one  year,  turning  his  attention  at  the  end  of  that 
time  to  teaching  in  the  Oshawa  and  Mitchell  Collegiate  Institutes,  gaining  marked 
distinction  in  this  field.  His  ability  brought  to  him  the  appointment  to  a  lecture- 
ship in  St.  John's  Collegej  University  of  Manitoba,  and  after  spending  some  time  in 
this  line  of  work  he  was  appointed  senior  fellow  in  the  department  of  romance  lan- 
guages in  the  University  of  Chicago.  When  he  resigned  this  in  1905  he  came  to 
Vancouver  and  in  the  same  year  established  the  Vancouver  Business  Institute,  of 
which  he  has  since  been  president,  the  credit  for  its  phenomenal  growth  and  sub- 


322 

stantial  success  being  due  entirely  to  his  genius  for  organization  and  his  knowledge 
of  everything  connected  with  commercial  school  work.  Realizing  the  need  of 
thoroughness  in  an  institution  of  this  kind,  Mr.  Sprott  employs  none  but  the  best 
teachers  and  his  school  courses  are  taught  in  the  best  manner  known  to  modern 
pedagogy.  These  are  at  all  times  practical,  departments  having  been  established 
in  which  pupils  can  be  fitted  for  almost  any  place  in  the  modern  business  world. 
The  attendance  has  increased  steadily  since  the  foundation  of  the  institute,  being 
now  three  hundred  and  seventy-five,  this  number  including  the  pupils  in  the  even- 
ing classes.  The  school's  continued  growth  has  brought  to  it  the  distinction  of 
being  the  second  largest  institution  of  its  kind  in  Canada  but  with  size  is  coupled 
that  more  necessary  qualification — thoroughness  in  all  branches — it  being  also  one 
of  the  best  and  most  intelligently  managed  educational  institutions  in  the  Do- 
minion. Courses  are  offered  in  stenography,  typewriting  and  bookkeeping  and 
besides  these  ordinary  branches  there  are  special  courses  in  mathematics,  embrac- 
ing the  higher  departments  and  preparing  the  pupils  for  positions  as  chartered 
accountants,  and  courses  in  salesmanship  and  advertising.  There  is  also  a  course 
in  civil  service  and,  contrary  to  the  rule  of  most  schools  of  this  type,  both  the  Pit- 
man and  Gregg  systems  of  shorthand  are  taught.  Mr.  Sprott  has  become  a 
specialist  along  lines  of  business  education  and  his  ability,  becoming  generally 
known  and  recognized,  has  carried  him  forward  into  important  educational  rela- 
tions. He  is  now  president  of  the  New  Westminster  Modern  Business  School  and 
of  the  Nanaimo  Business  School,  having  founded  the  former  in  1910  and  the 
latter  in  1912.  The  New  Westminster  institution  is  the  only  one  of  its  kind  in  the 
city  and  the  Nanaimo  school,  although  still  in  its  infancy,  is  progressing  well  and 
promises  to  be  of  the  same  high  standards  as  the  others  which  have  prospered  so 
greatly  under  the  careful  guidance  and  able  management  of  their  founder.  In 
purely  business  lines  Mr.  Sprott  is  chairman  of  the  board  of  directors  for  British 
Columbia  of  the  Western  Empire  Life  Insurance  Company. 

In  Vancouver,  on  the  2Oth  of  October,  1910,  Mr.  Sprott  was  united  in  mar- 
riage to  Miss  Beatrice  Van  Sickle,  a  daughter  of  Rev.  M.  Van  Sickle,  of  this  city. 
Mr.  Sprott  gives  his  allegiance  to  the  conservative  party  but  is  not  active  in  politics, 
preferring  to  devote  all  his  attention  to  his  educational  interests.  A  man  of  broad 
views,  of  scholarly  attainments  and  progressive  in  spirit,  he  has  risen  to  promi- 
nence in  the  special  field  to  which  he  has  devoted  his  energies  and  talents  and  his 
powers  have  steadily  developed  during  the  years,  influencing  and  raising  general 
educational  standards  throughout  the  province.  To  Vancouver  he  has  given  an 
institution  which  is  practically  perfect  of  its  kind  and  the  influence  of  which  upon 
the  future  business  life  of  the  city  is  almost  impossible  to  estimate. 


MALCOLM  ALEXANDER  MAcLEAN. 

Few  men  were  more  familiar  with  the  history  of  western  Canada  from  Win- 
nipeg to  the  coast  than  was  Malcolm  Alexander  MacLean,  and  his  value  as  a 
citizen  of  Vancouver  was  widely  acknowledged.  He  arrived  in  Vancouver  when 
the  district  was  almost  an  uninhabited  wilderness,  the  site  of  the  city  being  largely 
covered  by  magnificent  pine  forests.  From  the  time  of  his  arrival  he  showed  a 
public-spirited  interest  in  municipal  affairs,  and  as  time  went  on,  his  efforts  for 
the  upbuilding  and  improvement  of  the  city  were 'far-reaching  and  beneficial. 

Mr.  MacLean  was  a  native  of  Tiree  and  was  therefore  a  highlander,  the 
son  of  Allan  and  Jane  MacLean,  who  brought  their  family  to  Canada  in  1850 
and  settled  in  the  province  of  Ontario.  Although  only  a  child  when  he  came 
to  Canada,  Mr.  MacLean  had  learned  the  language  of  the  Celt,  and  throughout 
his  life  he  practiced  the  tongue  so  dear  to  the  people  of  the  north,  and  never  for- 
got it,  conversing  with  brother  Celts  fluently.  He  began  his  education  in  the 
public  schools  of  Ontario,  attended  grammar  school  at  Manilla,  and  subsequently 
took  up  teaching  as  a  profession;  but  only  for  a  time,  as  he  was  desirous  of 


MALCOLM  A.  MACLEAN 


BRITISH    COLUMBIA  325 

studying  medicine  and  purposed  becoming  a  doctor.  When  serious  financial 
reverses  overtook  his  elder  brother,  who  was>  engaged  in  the  lumbering  business, 
Mr.  MacLean  turned  over  all  his  savings  to  help  his  brother  in  meeting  his  obli- 
gations, and  his  plans  for  entering  upon  the  study  of  medicine  were  thereby 
abandoned.  This  act  was  characteristic  of  the  man  throughout  his  life.  He 
was  not  only  generous  in  spirit,  but  capable,  and  in  the  hour  of  need  proved 
"a  friend  indeed"  to  many.  After  making  his  gift  to  his  brother  he  decided  to 
prepare  himself  for  a  business  career,  and  entered  Eastman's  Business  College 
at  Poughkeepsie,  New  York.  After  finishing  his  course  there  he  entered  the 
New  York  office  of  the  Cunard  Steamship  Company,  where  he  remained  for 
several  years.  Later  he  returned  to  Canada  and  engaged  in  business  in  Oshawa 
and  Dundas  and  again  in  Toronto,  where  he  received  the  government  appoint- 
ment of  official  assignee.  When  the  exodus  to  the  west  began  Mr.  MacLean 
joined  a  party  of  business  men  and  set  out  for  Winnipeg,  then  a  comparatively 
small  city.  Here  he  became  one  of  the  leading  wholesale  merchants  and  acquired 
a  large  fortune.  He  extended  his  operations  to  the  real-estate  field  in  company 
with  his  brother-in-law,  the  late  A.  W.  Ross,  for  many  years  member  of  the 
Dominion  house  for  Lisgar.  Like  hundreds  of  others  Mr.  MacLean  suffered 
severely  in  the  collapse  of  the  boom  in  the  early  '8os,  and  leaving  Winnipeg,  he 
settled  on  a  farm  at  Qu'Appelle.  This  he  developed  into  a  magnificent  stock 
farm,  which  became  a  center  of  hospitality  in  that  part  of  the  northwest.  Many 
newcomers  from  the  old  country  sought  the  advice  and  assistance  of  Mr.  Mac- 
Lean  in  those  days  because  of  his  thorough  knowledge  of  the  country,  good 
judgment  and  willingness  to  assist  others,  and  among  the  guests  who  visited 
Laggan  Stock  Farm  were  counted  many  distinguished  names.  The  Saskatchewan 
rebellion  broke  out  at  this  time,  and  although  Mr.  MacLean's  farm  was  sur- 
rounded by  bands  of  Indians,  his  fair  treatment  of  the  redskins  and  uniform 
kindness  saved  him  from  molestation. 

Looking  for  more  encouraging  conditions  still  further  west,  Mr.  MacLean 
left  his  wife  and  children  in  eastern  Canada  and  made  his  way  to  the  Pacific 
coast,  reaching  Vancouver  by  way  of  San  Francisco  about  the  end  of  Decem- 
ber, 1885.  He  opened  a  real-estate  office,  again  in  company  with  his  brother- 
in-law,  the  late  A.  W.  Ross,  and  became  very  active  in  public  affairs.  He  was 
one  of  those  who  were  instrumental  in  bringing  about  the  incorporation  of  Van- 
couver as  a  city  in  the  year  1886,  and  was  elected  its  first  mayor.  A  short  time 
after  the  city's  incorporation  occurred  the  great  fire  which  swept  away  the  entire 
settlement.  Then  it  was  that  Mr.  MacLean  did  heroic  work  for  the  stricken 
and  homeless.  His  wide  acquaintance  with  eastern  business  men  enabled  him 
to  do  much  personally  toward  bringing  speedy  relief  and  liberal  assistance  to 
\  ancouver.  His  management  of  a  trying  situation  was  admirable.  In  1887  he 
was  reelected  by  a  large  majority.  During  the  two  years  in  which  he  filled  the 
mayor's  chair  he  gave  his  services  freely,  and  declined  to  accept  any  salary 
throughout  that  time.  He  lost  heavily  in  the  fire,  but  his  courageous  spirit  did 
not  desert  him  and  his  character  developed  and  his  worth  became  more  and  more 
appreciated.  In  1888  he  became  police  magistrate,  a  position  which  he  held  for 

al  years.  While  on  the  bench  he  tried  some  sixteen  hundred  cases  and  but 
few  of  them  were  appealed.  In  the  first  two  years  of  the  city's  life  he  agitated 
the  setting  aside  of  tracts  of  land  for  park  purposes  in  various  parts  of  the  city, 
arguing  that  the  time  would  come  when  Vancouver  would  require  breathing 

s,  and  that  the  cos^  of  such  land  would  be  heavy  in  days  to  come.  The 
councils  of  those  early  days  did  not  agree  with  this  view  and  Mr.  MacLean 
found  it  impossible  to  carry  out  one  of  his  cherished  schemes.  He  was  able 
lo  a  great  deal,  however,  towards  securing  Stanley  park  for  the  people 
<-f  Vancouver,  with  the  assistance  of  Mr.  A.  W.  Ross,  then  a  member  of  parlia- 
ment for  the  Dominion  house,  and  other  public-spirited  men.  Mr.  MacLean  was 
deeply  interested  in  immigration  and  foresaw 'the  part  that  immigration  was  to 

in  the  building  up  of  the  west.  In  this  connection  he  undertook  important 
work  for  the  government  and  was  the  means  of  inducing  large  colonies  of  Cana- 


326  BRITISH    COLUMBIA 

dians,  who  had  gone  to  the  United  States  of  America  some  years  before,  to 
return  to  the  northwest  wheat  fields  and  to  the  promising  districts  of  British 
Columbia.  He  contributed  a  number  of  articles  to  the  Scottish  American  and 
various  old  country  journals  bearing  on  the  brilliant  future  of  Canada,  more  par- 
ticularly the  west. 

In  all  that  he  undertook  Mr.  MacLean  was  ably  assisted  by  his  wife,  who 
•was  Miss  Margaret  Cattanach,  a  member  of  one  of  the  best  known  families  of 
Ontario,  also  of  highland  blood.  During  her  long  residence  in  Vancouver  Mrs. 
MacLean  has  associated  herself  preeminently  with  good  works  and  given  a  help- 
ing hand  to  many.  Five  children  were  born  of  the  marriage,  three  daughters 
and  two  sons:  Ethelwynne  Kate;  Alexandra  Isabel  Ross;  and  Constance  Mary, 
who  became  the  wife  of  LeRoy  Eraser  Grant,  civil  engineer  and  a  graduate  of 
Kingston  Military  College;  Duart  Cluny  Cattanach;  and  Malcolm  Mackenzie 
Gordon. 

In  the  spring  of  1895  Mr.  MacLean  received  the  appointment  of  stipendiary 
magistrate  for  the  county  of  Vancouver,  but  he  never  sat  on  the  bench,  for  death 
came  to  him,  after  a  few  weeks  of  illness,  on  the  4th  of  April  in  that  year.  In 
his  passing  Vancouver  lost  one  of  her  most  valued  and  honored  residents.  He 
was  the  organizer  of  the  Pioneer  Society  and  its  first  president.  He  founded 
likewise  the  St.  Andrew's  and  Caledonian  Society  and  the  Highland  Society  and 
was  the  first  president  of  both.  He  was  a  forceful  and  gifted  speaker,  many 
of  his  addresses  being  of  a  high  order.  He  was  a  member  of  the  Presbyterian 
church,  and  his  entire  life  was  actuated  by  high  and  honorable  principles  that 
made  his  example  and  his  labors  a  force  for  good.  None  questioned  the  integ- 
rity of  his  motives,  and  all  acknowledged  the  worth  of  his  public  service,  ranking 
him  with  one  of  the  west's  most  valued  pioneers. 


THOMAS    KIRKPATRICK. 

Prominent  among  the  energetic,  enterprising  and  successful  business  men  of 
Vancouver  is  Thomas  Kirkpatrick,  shingle  manufacturer,  whose  interests  are 
extensive  and  of  growing  importance.  He  was  born  at  Kirkshill,  Parsboro,  Cum- 
berland county,  Nova  Scotia,  December  10,  1864,  his  parents  being  Alexander 
and  Eliza  (Mason)  Kirkpatrick,  the  family  being  of  Irish  descent  and  both 
parents  passed  away  in  Nova  Scotia.  The  father  was  among  the  early  settlers 
of  that  section  of  Nova  Scotia  in  which  his  son  Thomas  was  born.  The  latter 
was  reared  upon  his  father's  farm  and  his  education  was  acquired  in  the  public 
schools  of  his  native  province.  In  1883,  when  nineteen  years  of  age,  he  went 
to  Boston,  Massachusetts,  where  he  was  variously  employed  for  two  years,  and 
in  April,  1886,  he  came  to  British  Columbia,  having  been  urged  in  a  letter  from 
a  friend  to  try  the  extreme  west,  settling  in  Vancouver,  which  city  had  but  been 
brought  under  municipal  form  of  government  and  named  in  that  year.  He  first 
earned  his  livelihood  by  driving  stage  between  Vancouver  and  New  Westminster. 
He  has  since  been  an  interested  witness  of  the  growth  of  the  city  and  its  develop- 
ment and  has  borne  an  important  part  in  the  work  of  progress  and  improvement, 
especially  through  the  development  of  his  business  interests,  which  have  been 
a  factor  in  bringing  about  its  present  commercial  greatness.  Soon  after  the 
fire  of  1886,  he  entered  the  employ  of  George  Slater  in  the  shingle  manufactur- 
ing business  and  remained  with  him  for  two  years,  after  which  he  started  in 
business  on  his  own  account  at  Port  Moody,  under  the  firm  name  of  Kirkpat- 
rick &  Hartsell,  there  renting  a  small  mill,  which  he  operated  for  two  years.  He 
gained  a  good  start  in  business  there  and  in  1890  he  built  a  scow,  the  relic  of 
which  now  lies  in  the  yard  of  his  present  mill,  a  reminder  of  the  early  days,  on 
which  he  erected  a  shingle  mill  that  he  operated  for  two  years  on  False  creek, 
near  the  foot  of  Burrard  street.  He  next  purchased  a  mill  site  at  Cedar  Cove, 
to  which  location  he  removed  his  mill.  In  1900  he  sold  his  old  plant  and  bought 


THOMAS  KIRKPATRICK 


BRITISH    COLUMBIA  329 

the  Archibald  McNair  mill  at  Hastings,  which  he  still  operates,  and  in  1902, 
his  mill  at  Cedar  Cove  having  been  destroyed  by  fire,  he  purchased  the  Welsh 
mill  at  New  Westminster  and  built  an  additional  mill  at  Hastings,  thus  having 
two  mills  there.  In  1904  the  mill  at  New  Westminster  was  destroyed  by  fire, 
entailing  a  large  financial  loss.  However,  he  continues  in  the  shingle  manufac- 
turing business  to  the  present  time,  operating  his  mills  at  Hastings,  and  his  out- 
put is  large,  his  products  selling  throughout  Ontario  and  the  northwest.  In 
fact,  he  is  at  the  head  of  one  of  the  important  productive  industries  of  his  sec- 
tion, having  a  well  equipped  plant,  while  the  finished  product  which  he  turns  out, 
because  of  its  excellence  and  durability,  finds  a  ready  sale  on  the  market.  More- 
over, in  his  dealings  he  is  a  man  of  unimpeachable  integrity,  fair  and  square  in 
all  business  transactions,  his  course  proving  an  exemplification  of  the  old  adage 
that  honesty  is  the  best  policy.  As  he  has  prospered  in  his  undertakings  he  has 
invested  in  realty  in  Vancouver  and  vicinity  and  his  holdings  are  now  extensive. 
On  the  i8th  of  September,  1890,  Mr.  Kirkpatrick  was  united  in  marriage  to 
Miss  Elizabeth  Brander,  a  native  of  Halifax  and  of  Scotch  descent,  her  father 
being  Robert  Brander,  of  Halifax.  Their  children  are:  Earl  Alexander,  who 
graduated  from  McGill  University  on  May  13,  1913;  and  Robert  Huntley,  for 
two  years  a  student  in  the  Vancouver  branch  of  AIcGill  University.  The  family 
are  Presbyterians  in  religious  faith.  Mr.  Kirkpatrick  is  a  conservative  in  pol- 
itics and,  like  all  loyal  citizens,  feels  an  interest  in  the  political  situation  of  the 
day.  He  served  as  alderman  of  Vancouver,  having  entered  upon  his  first  term 
in  1909  and  still  serves  in  that  office  laboring  to  promote  the  municipal  welfare. 
His  social  nature  finds  expression  in  his  membership  in  the  Terminal  City  and 
Commercial  Clubs.  Men  know  him  to  be  forceful  and  resourceful,  capable  and 
determined,  and  he  belongs,  moreover,  to  that  class  of  men  who  owe  their 
advancement  and  enviable  position  to  their  own  efforts. 


ARCHIBALD  L.  TEETZEL. 

Since  the  fall  of  1907  Archibald  L.  Teetzel  has  figured  in  business  circles  in 
Vancouver  in  connection  with  the  hardware  trade  and  is  now  conducting  a  whole- 
sale business  along  that  line  under  the  firm  name  of  Macpherson  &  Teetzel 
although  he  is  now  sole  proprietor.  His  business  in  this  connection  has  assumed 
extensive  proportions  and  yet  does  not  entirely  cover  the  range  of  his  activities, 
for  in  other  fields  he  is  also  laboring  successfully.  He  was  born  in  western 
Ontario  in  1880,  his  parents  being  James  E.  and  Julia  (Leitch)  Teetzel,  who  were 
also  natives  of  that  province.  The  father  was  a  civil  engineer  and  practiced  his 
profession  in  Ontario  until  he  retired  from  active  business  in  1906.  He  then  came 
to  Vancouver,  where  he  and  his  wife  still  reside,  Mr.  Teetzel  now  enjoying  the 
rest  which  should  ever  follow  earnest,  persistent  and  honorable  effort. 

Archibald  L.  Teetzel  is  indebted  to  the  grade  and  high  schools  of  Ontario 
for  the  educational  opportunities  afforded  him,  and  when  his  education  was  com- 
pleted he  secured  a  position  as  clerk  in  a  general  store  in  Ontario,  where  he  re- 
mained for  eight  years.  No  higher  testimonial  of  his  fidelity  and  capability  could 
be  given  than  the  fact  that  he  was  retained  in  one  employ  for  so  long  a  period. 
In  April,  1901,  he  arrived  in  Vancouver  and  immediately  afterward  accepted  the 
position  of  traveling  salesman  with  the  firm  of  Ramsey  Brothers,  wholesale 
grocers,  who  were  represented  throughout  the  provinces  of  British  Columbia  and 
Alberta,  continuing  in  that  work  for  six  years.  He  resigned  his  position  at  the 
beginning  of  the  year  1907  in  order  to  engage  in  the  wholesale  and  retail  grocery 
business  at  Nelson,  British  Columbia,  in  which  he  was  associated  with  R.  M. 
Hood,  formerly  a  traveling  salesman  for  W.  H.  Malkin  &  Company  of  Vancouver, 
under  the  firm  style  of  Hood  &  Teetzel.  Eight  months  later  he  sold  out  to  his 
partner  and  in  the  fall  of  1907  became  a  resident  of  Vancouver,  where  he  entered 
into  business  relations  with  D.  Macpherson.  They  established  a  wholesale  hard- 


330  BRITISH    COLUMBIA 

ware  business  under  the  firm  name  of  Macpherson  &  Teetzel  and  a  year  later  Mr. 
Teetzel  purchased  his  partner's  interest,  since  which  time  he  has  been  sole  pro- 
prietor, although  the  business  is  still  conducted  under  the  original  firm  name.  The 
business  has  steadily  grown,  and  in  addition  to  its  extensive  trade  in  shelf  and 
heavy  hardware  represents,  as  manufacturing  agents,  the  William  Buck  Stove 
Company,  Ltd.,  of  Brantford,  Ontario.  The  firm  handles  all  kinds  of  hardware 
and  household  utensils,  selling  only  to  the  wholesale  trade,  .and  as  the  years  have 
passed  on  the  business  has  constantly  grown  until  it  has  now  assumed  large  pro- 
portions. In  January,  1912,  Mr.  Teetzel  organized  the  Pacific  Rubber  Tire  & 
Repair  Company,  Ltd.,  of  Vancouver,  of  which  he  is  the  president  and  manager. 
The  plant  is  located  at  No.  1259  Granville  street,  and  they  are  agents  for  the 
Firestone  tires. 

In  January,  1906,  at  Revelstoke,  British  Columbia,  Mr.  Teetzel  was  united  in 
marriage  to  Miss  Grace  Love,  of  Ontario,  and  they  have  four  daughters:  Grace 
Eileen,  Audrey,  Jean  Julia  and  Flora.  The  parents  are  members  of  St.  John's 
Presbyterian  church  and  Mr.  Teetzel  is  also  a  member  of  the  Independent  Order 
of  Odd  Fellows.  He  belongs  to  the  Vancouver  Auto  Club,  Vancouver  Commer- 
cial Club  and  the  Board  of  Trade,  and  is  a  cooperant  factor  in  various  measures 
and  movements  which  are  factors  in  the  public  welfare.  In  his  business  life  he 
is  determined  a'nd  energetic.  His  plans  are  well  formulated  and  carefully  exe- 
cuted and  he  carries  forward  to  successful  completion  whatever  he  undertakes. 
Although, one  of  the  younger  merchants  of  the  city,  he  has  steadily  advanced  and 
has  made  for  himself  an  enviable  position  in  commercial  circles  of  Vancouver. 


GEORGE    CLIFFORD    HINTON. 

George  Clifford  Hinton,  of  Vancouver,  was  connected  with  the  construction 
of  the  first  street  railway  and  electric  lighting  system  of  the  province,  and  is 
today  actively  and  successfully  engaged  in  business  as  head  of  the  firm  of  George 
C.  Hinton  &  Company,  consulting  electrical  engineers  and  dealers  in  and  manu- 
facturers of  electrical  and  steam  machinery.  Other  corporations  have  also 
profited  by  his  cooperation,  his  sound  judgment  and  his  enterprising  spirit,  his 
business  activities  haying  constituted  an  important  element  in  general  develop- 
ment in  this  section  of  the  country.  He  was  born  in  Ottawa,  Ontario,  July  27, 
1868,  and  is  a  son  of  Robert  and  Lila  (Hyde)  Hinton,  the  former  extensively 
engaged  in  farming  and  in  the  timber  business  in  Ontario.  The  father  came 
to  Canada  in  1810  from  Belfast,  Ireland,  settling  in  Carleton  county,  near 
Ottawa,  Ontario.  He  engaged  in  farming,  acquiring  large  tracts  of  land,  por- 
tions of  which  were  devoted  to  general  agricultural  pursuits,  in  addition  to 
which  he  had  extensive  timber  and  lumber  interests. 

George  C.  Hinton  began  his  education  at  the  usual  age  as  a  public-school 
pupil  of  Ottawa,  and  in  the  Collegiate  Institute  of  that  city  continued  his  studies 
until  1882,  when  he  made  his  initial  step  in  the  business  world  as  an  appren- 
tice in  the  boiler  making  and  machine  department  of  Fleck's  Machine  Works  at 
Ottawa,  completing  the  full  term  of  his  indenture — three  years.  In  1886  he 
entered  the  employ  of  the  Electric  Company  at  Ottawa,  with  which  he  re- 
mained until  1889,  when  he  came  to  British  Columbia,  assisting  in  the  con- 
struction of  the  electric  street  railway  and  electric  lighting  system  of  Vic- 
toria, which  was  the  first  electric  street  railway  to  be  built  in  the  province.  Mr. 
Hinton  was  actively  engaged  in  that  work  until  1899,  when  he  came  to  Van- 
couver and  established  an  independent  business  on  his  own  account.  In  this 
he  has  since  continued,  operating  under  the  name  of  George  C.  Hinton  &  Com- 
pany. From  a  business  established  on  a  comparatively  small  scale,  it  has 
grown  to  large  proportions.  They  are  consulting  electrical  engineers,  dealers  in 
and  manufacturers  of  electrical  and  steam  machinery  and  general  electrical  con- 
tractors for  power  and  lighting  plants.  In  fact,  their  business  covers  the  entire 


GEORGE  C.  HINTON 


BRITISH    COLUMBIA  333 

scope  of  activity  along  those  lines  and  their  patronage  has  steadily  grown,  for  they 
have  shown  themselves  to  be  masters  of  everything  connected  with  electrical 
equipment  and  construction.  Mr.  Hinton,  through  practical  experience  and  wide 
reading,  has  constantly  broadened  his  knowledge,  and  his  scientific  attainments,  as 
well  as  practical  skill,  place  him  with  the  leaders  in  this  field.  Mr.  Hinton  also 
has  other  extensive  financial  and  commercial  interests,  being  an  officer  or  direc- 
tor in  a  number  of  corporations  and  companies,  including  the  Burton  Saw  Works, 
Ltd. ;  the  Western  Gypsum  Company,  Ltd.,  and  the  Campbell  River  Power  Com- 
pany, of  all  of  which  he  is  a  director.  He  also  staked  and  acquired  the  water 
rights  on  Stave  river  and  was  on  the  first  directorate  superintending  the  early 
development.  His  judgment  is  never  hastily  formed  and  the  soundness  of  his 
opinions  is  indicated  in  the  excellent  results  which  have  attended  his  efforts  and 
his  management  of  important  commercial  and  industrial  interests. 

On  the  ist  of  November,  1894,  at  Olympia,  Washington,  Mr.  Hinton  was 
united  in  marriage  to  Miss  Gertrude  Elizabeth  Carlyon,  a  daughter  of  William 
Carlyon,  formerly  of  Cornwall,  England,  but  who  in  1895  went  to  Victoria, 
British  Columbia,  where  he  lived  retired  until  his  death  in  1901.  The  children 
of  this  marriage  are  Gerald  Lome,  Gertrude  Irene  and  Doris.  Mr.  Hinton  is 
a  member  of  Cascade  Lodge  No.  12,  A.  F.  &  A.  M.,  and  of  the  Anglican  church, 
and  in  his  life  exemplifies  the  faith  and  principles  of  both.  Socially  he  is  con- 
nected with  the  Terminal  City  and  Burnaby  Country  Clubs.  Throughout  his 
entire  career  his  advancement  has  come  as  the  result  of  well  defined  capabilities 
and  powers  intelligently  directed  the  wise  utilization  of  opportunities,  and  an 
understanding  of  conditions  in  the  special  field  of  business  in  which  he  has 
labored.  Gradually  he  has  climbed  upward,  and  diligence,  determination  and 
reliability  have  constituted  the  rounds  of  the  ladder  on  which  he  has  mounted. 


CHARLES  JAMES  KAY. 

Charles  James  Kay  is  the  vice  president  of  the  Columbia  Paper  Company  of 
Vancouver  and  thus  occupies  a  leading  position  in  business  circles.  The  secret  of 
his  success  lies  largely  in  the  fact  that  he  has  always  continued  in  the  line  of  busi- 
ness in  which  he  embarked  as  a  young  tradesman,  thoroughly  acquainting  himself 
with  every  phase  of  the  paper  trade  as  the  years  have  gone  by.  He  has  thus 
become  well  qualified  for  the  active  management  and  control  of  an  important 
enterprise  of  this  character.  He  was  born  in  Dundee,  Scotland,  March  7,  1876, 
and  is  a  son  of  James  and  Jane  (Kenneth)  Kay,  both  of  whom  were  natives  of 
Dundee.  The  father  came  to  Canada  in  1908  and  now  resides  in  Okanagan, 
where  he  is  living  retired. 

In  the  public  schools  of  Dundee  and  Edinburgh,  Charles  James  Kay  pursued 
his  education,  passing  through  consecutive  grades  to  the  high  school.  He  after- 
ward entered  a  large  paper  mill  at  Polton,  Scotland,  just  outside  of  Edinburgh, 
and  there  learned  the  trade  of  paper  making,  serving  a  five  years'  apprenticeship, 
thus  gaining  thorough  knowledge  of  the  business.  He  afterward  went  to  Guard- 
bridge,  Scotland,  where  he  acquainted  himself  with  both  the  mechanical  and  com- 
mercial phases  of  the  business,  remaining  there  until  1903,  when  he  came  to 
Canada.  He  spent  one  year  in  Windsor  Mills  at  Quebec  "as  cashier,  clerk  and 
assistant  manager  of  the  Canadian  Paper  Company,  Ltd.,  and  later  went  to  Rum- 
ford  Falls,  Maine,  where  he  acted  as  night  foreman  for  the  Oxford  Paper  Com- 
pany. He  next  removed  to  Antioch,  California,  where  he  became  mill  manager 
for  the  California  Paper  Mills,  continuing  in  that  position  for  three  years.  On  the 
expiration  of  that  period,  in  1908,  he  came  to  Vancouver  and  was  with  the  firm  of 
Smith,  Davidson  &  Wright,  Ltd.,  until  1911,  when  he  joined  K.  A.  Smeed  and 
\Y.  W.  Wolfenden  in  organizing  the  Columbia  Paper  Company,  Ltd.,  of  which 
he  is  vice  president  and  manager.  They  are  wholesale  jobbers  and  importers  of 
all  kinds  of  writing  paper,  wrapping  paper,  novelty  papers,  paper  boxes,  and  stock 


334  BRITISH    COLUMBIA 

for  use  in  the  highest  class  of  printing  and  engraving.  Their  business  has  reached 
extensive  proportions,  having  been  developed  along  lines  which  have  resulted  in 
a  constant  increase  in  their  trade.  The  reputation  of  the  house  is  an  unassailable 
one  and  their  success  is  the  direct  outcome  of  close  application,  capable  manage- 
ment and  enterprising  methods. 

In  1907  Mr.  Kay  was  married  in  Cambus,  Scotland,  to  Miss  Agnes  Luttie,  of 
that  country,  and  they  have  an  extensive  circle  of  warm  friends  in  Vancouver. 
While  in  Scotland  Mr.  Kay  served  for  six  years  in  the  Volunteers,  three  years 
in  the  Royal  Scots  and  three  in  the  Black  Watch.  He  is  also  active  in  cricket, 
football  and  golf  circles.  He  votes  with  the  conservative  party  but  has  never  been 
an  active  politician,  preferring  to  concentrate  his  energies  upon  his  business  affairs 
which  have  been  of  constantly  growing  importance.  Both  he  and  his  wife  are 
Presbyterians  in  faith,  taking  an  active  and  helpful  interest  in  the  work  of  St. 
Andrew's  Presbyterian  church. 


KARL  ALFRED  SMEED. 

Karl  Alfred  Smeed  is  the  president  of  the  Columbia  Paper  Company,  one  oi 
the  leading  business  concerns  of  Vancouver,  and  in  this  connection  has  built  up  a 
trade  of  large  and  gratifying  proportions.  To  his  present  creditable  position  in 
commercial  circles  he  has  gradually  worked  his  way  upward  and  his  prosperity 
is  the  merited  reward  of  earnest  and  honorable  effort.  He  was  born  in  Toronto, 
Ontario,  November  i,  1876,  a  son  of  Thomas  and  Marion  F.  (Harper)  Smeed, 
both  of  whom  were  natives  of  London,  England.  Their  marriage  was  celebrated 
in  the  metropolis  and  in  1869  they  came  to  Canada,  settling  in  Toronto.  After 
several  years  there  spent  they  removed  to  Winnipeg,  where  the  mother  still  makes 
her  home,  but  the  father  is  now  deceased. 

Karl  A.  Smeed  was  a  young  man  at  the  time  of  the  removal  to  Manitoba, 
and  in  the  public  schools  of  Winnipeg  and  in  Lingfield,  England,  he  pursued  his 
education.  At  length  he  returned  to  Winnipeg,  where  he  entered  a  crockery  store 
in  the  position  of  clerk,  being  there  employed  for  one  year.  He  next  engaged  with 
Parsons,  Bell  &  Company,  stationery  dealers  of  that  city,  who  later  amalgamated 
their  interests  with  O'Loughran  Brothers,  forming  the  Consolidated  Stationery 
Company.  In  1898  he  left  their  office  and  went  upon  the  road  for  the  company 
as  a  traveling  salesman,  his  territory  being  southern  Manitoba  and  Saskatchewan. 
This  brought  him  still  broader  knowledge  of  the  business  in  its  relations  with  the 
trade,  and  he  continued  in  that  position  until  1906,  when  he  entered  the  employ  of 
W.  J.  Gage  &  Company,  Ltd.,  manufacturing  stationers  and  paper  dealers  of 
Toronto,  whom  he  represented  as  a  traveling  salesman  until  the  close  of  the  year 
1910.  In  January,  1911,  seeing  an  opportunity  for  engaging  in  business  on  his  own 
account,  he  joined  Charles  J.  Kay  and  W.  W.  Wolfenden  in  organizing  the  Colum- 
bia Paper  Company,  Ltd.,  of  Vancouver,  of  which  he  is  the  president.  This  is 
now  a  well  established  enterprise,  its  ramifying  trade  relations  constantly  reaching 
out,  while  the  volume  of  business  transacted  by  the  house  is  today  most  gratify- 
ing, showing  that  the  firm  has  become  well  established  in  public  regard  through 
its  enterprising  methods. 

EDWARD    CHRISTMAN    KNIGHT. 

Edward  Christman  Knight,  prominently  connected  with  business  interests 
of  Vancouver  as  managing  director  of  the  Vancouver  Lumber  Company,  Lim- 
ited, was  born  in  Philadelphia,  Pennsylvania,  on  the  ist  of  September,  1868, 
a  son  of  William  A.  and  Sarah  (Pinckney)  Knight,  natives  of  that  state,  both 
of  whom  have  passed  away.  Their  son  acquired  his  education  in  the  German- 


EDWARD  C.  KNIGHT 


-     BRITISH    COLUMBIA  337 

town  Academy  and  in  the  University  of  Pennsylvania,  taking  the  course  in 
mining  and  metallurgical  engineering  in  the  latter  institution  with  the  class  of 
1889.  After  his  graduation  he  became  associated  with  the  Illinois  Steel  Com- 
pany and  he  retained  this  connection  for  seven  years  thereafter,  resigning  it  in 
order  to  go  to  Mexico  in  the  employ  of  the  Guggenheim  Smelting  Company, 
which  later  became  the  American  Smelting  &  Refining  Company.  He  acted  for 
them  as  ore  buyer  and  general  agent  and  rose  from  that  position  to  be  manager 
of  the  Monterey  and  Blandena  plants.  He  was  also  a  member  of  the  executive 
committee  during  the  last  two  years  of  his  stay  in  Mexico.  In  the  fall  of  1908 
Mr.  Knight  came  to  Vancouver  and  purchased  an  interest  in  the  Vancouver 
Lumber  Company,  Limited,  having  since  remained  as  managing  director.  This 
is  one  of  the  oldest  concerns  of  its  kind  in  the  city,  having  been  founded  about 
the  year  1886  and  was  first  known  as  the  Red  Mill,  owned  by  Leamy  &  Kyle. 
It  has  since  been  under  various  managements  but  its  prosperity  has  continued 
without  interruption  and  its  place  today  is  among  the  leading  industrial  institu- 
tions in  this  part  of  the  province.  In  1904  it  was  purchased  by  J.  E.  Tucker  and 
A.  L.  Clark  and  the  present  name  adopted,  Mr.  Tucker  being  president  and 
A.  L  Clark,  vice  president. 

At  Taylor,  Texas,  on  the  22d  of  April,  1903,  Mr.  Knight  was  united  in 
marriage  to  Miss  lone  Tucker,  of  that  city,  and  they  have  two  children,  Mary 
and  Edward  Tucker.  Mr.  Knight  has  extensive  club  affiliations,  belonging  to 
the  Vancouver  Club  and  the  Vancouver  Royal  Yacht  Club,  the  Jericho  Country 
Club  and  the  Shaughnessy  Heights  and  Vancouver  Golf  Clubs,  these  connec- 
tions indicating  something  of  the  nature  and  extent  of  his  outside  interests. 


ELMER  E.  CRANDALL. 

Elmer  E.  Crandall,  manufacturers'  agent  at  Vancouver,  has  throughout  his 
business  career  displayed  the  qualities  of  close  aplication  and  unremitting  energy 
so  necessary  to  success,  and  his  advancement,  therefore,  has  been  the  legitimate 
and  logical  outcome  of  his  efforts.  He  was  born  in  New  Brunswick,  January  9, 
1862,  and  is  a  son  of  Y.  A.  Crandall,  who  was  also  a  native  of  that  province  and 
who  spent  all  his  time  there  in  mercantile  life. 

In  his  youthful  days  Elmer  E.  Crandall  was  a  pupil  in  the  grammar  school  of 
St.  John,  New  Brunswick,  and  when  a  young  man  he  entered  the  employ  of  the 
King  Lumber  Company,  Ltd.,  of  Chipman,  New  Brunswick.  He  later  became 
manager  of  a  certain  department  of  the  business  and  after  thirteen  years  as  an 
employe  in  that  establishment  was  admitted  to  a  partnership.  This  is  a  large  and 
most  reliable  company,  conducting  an  immense  lumber  business  and  also  an  ex- 
tensive general  store  in  connection  with  the  lumber  trade.  The  president  of  the 
company  is  Senator  King. 

In  1910  Mr.  Crandall  started  westward,  visiting  a  number  of  points  en  route 
to  the  Pacific  coast,  but  eventually  reaching  Vancouver.  It  was  his  intention  to 
remain  for  only  a  few  months,  hoping  the  change  would  benefit  his  health.  He 
found  the  climate  not  only  so  beneficial  but  also  so  pleasing  that  he  determined 
to  remain  and  dispose  of  his  business  in  the  east.  This  he  soon  did  and  has  since 
been  closely  associated  with  commercial  interests  in  British  Columbia.  In  July, 
1910,  he  established  his  present  business  as  manufacturers'  agent,  in  which  connec- 
tion he  represents  Charles  Fawcett,  Limited,  of  Sackville,  New  Brunswick,  manu- 
facturers of  stoves,  ranges  and  furnaces.  He  is  also  agent  for  The  Lundy  Shovel 
&  Tool  Company,  of  Peterboro,  Ontario,  and  within  the  short  space  of  three  years 
his  business  has  reached  most  gratifying  proportions.  He  is  represented  on  the 
road  by  two  traveling  salesmen,  who  cover  the  entire  province  of  British  Colum- 
bia, and  he  expects  soon  to  open  a  branch  house  at  Calgary,  Alberta.  He  recently 
purchased  for  the  Charles  Fawcett,  Limited,  a  large  building,  at  No.  1052  Homer 
street,  which  they  have  occupied  since  the  ist  of  May,  1913. 


338  BRITISH    COLUMBIA 

In  1912  Mr.  Crandall  erected  a  handsome  apartment  house  in  the  eleven  hun- 
dred block  on  Eleventh  avenue,  which  is  a  decided  departure  from  the  usual 
apartment  building.  It  stands  on  a  spacious  lot,  with  broad  lawns  in  front  and 
rear,  and  contains  four  handsome  apartments,  commanding  a  beautiful  view  of 
the  Sound.  Every  modern  convenience  is  there  found  and  ideas  of  utility  and 
beauty  are  harmoniously  blended  with  the  result  that  the  apartments  are  largely 
ideal  from  every  point  of  view.  In  addition  Mr.  Crandall  also  owns  a  number 
of  houses  in  the  best  residential  section  of  Fairview,  one  of  which  he  occupies. 
He  has  made  judicious  investments  in  real  estate  and  is  thus  adding  annually  to 
his  income  aside  from  his  business  as  manufacturers'  agent. 

In  Chipman,  New  Brunswick,  on  the  6th  of  June,  1883,  Mr.  Crandall  was 
united  in  marriage  to  Miss  Ida  G.  King,  a  daughter  of  Senator  G.  G.  King.  They 
are  parents  of  eight  children:  Ida  May,  at  home;  Hazel  Claudia,  the  wife  of 
A.  G.  Carpenter,  of  Nelson,  British  Columbia;  Nellie  G.,  the  wife  of  I.  H.  Will- 
son,  of  Nanaimo,  British  Columbia ;  Ermengarde  and  Eugene,  Greta,  Horace  K. 
and  Esther  H.,  all  at  home.  Both  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Crandall  are  prominent  and 
valued  members  of  the  First  Baptist  church  of  Vancouver.  Mr.  Crandall  has 
been  identified  with  the  denomination  for  the  past  thirty  years,  and  while  in  the 
east  was  for  twenty  years  an  officer  in  the  church.  His  wife,  active  in  various 
departments  of  the  church  work,  is  now  president  of  the  Woman's  Mission  Cir- 
cle ;  she  is  also  president  of  the  West  End  Woman's  Christian  Temperance  Union 
and  is  an  interested  and  zealous  worker  in  its  several  departments. 

Mr.  and  Mrs.  Crandall  belong  to  that  class  of  citizens  whose  influence  is 
always  on  the  side  of  reform,  progress  and  improvement,  or  right  and  justice. 
He  has  led  a  busy  and  useful  life  and  since  his  removal  to  the  west  has  so  utilized 
his  opportunities  and  directed  his  labors  as  to  gain  for  himself  a  most  creditable 
position  in  business  circles  in  British  Columbia. 


WILLIAM  CHARLES  MACBETH. 

William  Charles  Macbeth  is  a  partner  in  the  firm  of  Macbeth  &  Brown,  con- 
ducting a  real-estate  brokerage  business.  They  are  also  general  insurance  agents, 
conveyancers,  collectors,  etc.,  and  their  clientage  is  extensive.  Mr.  Macbeth  is 
a  native  of  Scotland,  his  birth  having  occurred  at  Buckie,  Banffshire,  May  13, 
1879.  His  parents  were  James  and  Jessie  (Anderson)  Macbeth.  The  former 
came  to  Canada  from  Buckie,  Scotland,  in  1891,  and  settled  in  New  Westminster, 
British  Columbia,  where  he  followed  the  carpenter's  trade  until  his  death  in 
1900. 

In  the  schools  of  Scotland  William  C.  Macbeth  began  his  education  and  fol- 
lowing the  removal  of  the  family  to  Canada  he  continued  his  studies  at  New 
Westminster.  He  was  but  a  boy  in  years,  however,  when  he  entered  business 
circles,  since  which  time  he  has  been  dependent  entirely  upon  his  own  resources, 
so  that  his  success  is  the  merited  reward  of  labor  and  capable  management.  He 
became  a  clerk  in  a  grocery  store  in  New  Westminster  and  afterward  removed 
to  Vancouver,  where  he  entered  the  employ  of  Charles  Anderson  in  the  grocery 
business,  continuing  with  that  house  for  three  years.  He  was  next  employed 
in  the  grocery  store  of  John  Geddis  for  a  time  and  subsequently  was  in  the  em- 
ploy of  William  Walsh,  a  grocer,  with  whom  he  continued  for  four  years.  All 
this  time  he  was  actuated  by  the  laudable  desire  of  one  day  engaging  in  business 
on  his  own  account  and  carefully  saved  his  earnings  until  his  industry  and  econ- 
omy had  brought  to  him  sufficient  capital  to  enable  him  to  start  out  for  himself. 
It  was  in  1903  that  he  became  a  partner  in  the  firm  of  McLeod,  Macbeth  &  Com- 
pany in  the  ownership  and  conduct  of  a  dry-goods  store  at  the  corner  of  Main 
and  Hastings  streets.  He  was  a  factor  in  that  business  until  February,  1911, 
when  he  entered  into  the  real-estate  and  general  financial  brokerage  business  in 
association  with  William  Brown  and  William  H.  Brown  under  the  firm  name 


WILLIAM    C.    MAtT.KTI 


BRITISH    COLUMBIA  341 

of  Macbeth  &  Brown.  This  firm  succeeded  to  the  business  of  Mutrie  &  Brown, 
which  was  established  in  Vancouver  in  1888.  In  addition  to  conducting  a  gen- 
eral real-estate  brokerage  business  they  are  general  insurance  agents,  convey- 
ancers and  collectors.  From  the  beginning  the  enterprise  has  proven  a  profitable 
one.  Their  business  is  carefully  systematized  and  capably  managed  in  each  de- 
partment and  they  are  not  only  familiar  with  the  property  upon  the  market  and 
accurate  in  placing  valuations  thereon  but  are  also  representatives  of  a  number 
of  the  most  substantial  insurance  companies  and  are  successful  in  conveyancing 
and  collection  work. 

On  the  ist  of  January,  1905,  Mr.  Macbeth  was  united  in  marriage  to  Miss 
Beatrice  Hamilton,  a  daughter  of  George  Hamilton,  of  Vancouver,  and  they 
have  one  child,  Isabelle  Beatrice.  Mr.  Macbeth  holds  membership  in  the  Presby- 
terian church  and  also  with  the  Independent  Order  of  Odd  Fellows  and  the 
Royal  Arcanum.  In  politics  he  is  independent,  preferring  to  vote  as  his  judg- 
ment dictates  without  regard  to  party  ties.  Moreover,  he  has  taken  no  active  part 
in  politics,  preferring  to  concentrate  his  energies  upon  his  business  affairs. 
Gradually  he  has  worked  his  way  upward  and  the  loyalty  which  he  displayed 
as  an  employe  has  been  manifest  in  his  devotion  to  the  best  interests  of  his 
clients.  In  all  of  his  dealings  he  is  strictly  reliable  and  his  prosperity  has  been 
based  upon  energy  and  enterprise. 


HON.  JOSEPH  MARTIN,  K.  C,  M.  P. 

No  history  of  the  legal  profession  in  Vancouver  or  of  legislative  proceedings 
in  British  Columbia  would  be  complete  without  reference  to  the  Hon.  Joseph 
Martin,  long  an  able  and  distinguished  member  of  the  bar  of  that  city  and  one 
who  has  left  the  impress  of  his  individuality  upon  the  history  of  his  province  in 
shaping  and  promoting  as  well  as  in  administering  its  laws.     He  was  born  in 
Milton,  Ontario,  September  24,  1852,  a  son  of  Edward  and  Mary  Ann  (Fleming) 
Martin.     His  grandfather,  Jasper  Martin,  was  a  native  of  the  county  of  Cum- 
berland and  with  his  wife  and  family  sailed  for  the  new  world  about  1818,  cast 
ing  in  his  lot  with  the  first  settlers  of  Milton,  Ontario.    Edward  Martin  was  bon 
in  Canada  about  .1820  and  in  early  life  turned  his  attention  to  the  business  of  mer 
chandising.    When  his  son  Joseph  was  a  young  man  the  father  removed  to  Mich- 
igan, where  he  engaged  in  farming.     He  was  active  in  public  affairs  during  hii 
residence  in  Milton  and  served  for  one  or  two  terms  as  its  mayor.     His  death 
occurred  in  1885. 

His  son,  Joseph  Martin,  pursued  his  education  in  the  public  schools  of  Milton, 
Ontario,  and  in  the  Michigan  State  Normal  School  of  Ypsilanti,  Michigan,  and 
the  Provincial  Normal  School  at  Toronto.  He  was  graduated  from  the  last  named 
in  a  class  of  one  hundred  and  fifty  members  and  has  Certificate  A.  He  passed  the 
examinations  for  the  second  year  in  the  arts  course  at  the  Toronto  University. 
In  early  life  he  followed  the  profession  of  teaching  in  the  public  schools  near 
Ottawa  but  regarded  this  merely  as  an  initial  step  to  other  professional  labor  and 
turned  to  the  study  of  law  with  the  intention  of  making  its  pract'ice  his  life  work. 
In  1882  he  went  to  Manitoba  and  in  that  year  was  called  to  the  bar.  He  opened  an 
office  and  continued  in  practice  at  Portage  la  Prairie  and  at  Winnipeg  until  1897. 
He  was  not  only  accorded  a  liberal  clientage  but  also  became  a  leading  and  in- 
fluential factor  in  provincial  circles.  He  sat  for  Portage  la  Prairie  in  the  provin- 
cial legislature  from  1883  until  1892  and  was  attorney  general  of  Manitoba  under 
the  Greenway  administration  from  1888  until  1891.  He  unsuccessfully  con- 
tested Selkirk  for  the  house  of  commons  in  the  general  election  of  the  latter  year 
but  sat  for  Winnipeg  from  1893  until  1896. 

The  following  year  Mr.  Martin  removed  to  Vancouver,  where  he  opened  a 
law  office,  continuing  in  active  practice  in  that  city  until  1909.     Again  he  became 
recognized  leader  in  political  circles  and  sat  for  Vancouver  in  the  provincial 

Vol.  Ill— 12 


342  BRITISH    COLUMBIA 

legislature  from  1898  until  1903.  He  was  likewise  attorney  general  for  British 
Columbia  in  1898  and  1899  and  was  premier  and  attorney  general  of  the  province 
from  March  until  June,  1900.  In  1902-3  he  was  leader  of  the  opposition.  He 
unsuccessfully  contested  Vancouver  for  the  house  of  commons  as  an  independ- 
ent liberal ;  but  whether  in  office  or  out  of  it  has  exerted  a  marked  influence  on 
public  thought  and  action  because  of  his  broad  and  liberal  interpretation  of  the 
laws  and  his  statesmanlike  grasp  of  affairs. 

In  1909  Hon.  Joseph  Martin  became  a  resident  of  England  and  in  May  of 
that  year  was  defeated  for  southwest  Warwickshire  at  a  by-election.  Since  Janu- 
ary, 1910,  he  has  sat  for  East  St.  Pancras  in  the  house  of  commons.  While 
attorney  general  of  Manitoba  he  introduced  and  secured  the  passage  of  the  famous 
school  measure  abolishing  the  separate  schools  set  up  in  1871  and  establishing  in 
lieu  thereof  the  national  common  schools.  He  represented  the  provincial  govern- 
ment before  the  privy  council  when  the  legality  of  the  measure  was  being  passed 
upon.  In  the  house  of  commons  he  opposed  a  proposal  to  hand  over  the  improve- 
ment of  the  Red  river  to  a  private  company  and  also  the  remedial  bill.  He  believes 
in  the  abolishment  of  the  house  of  lords  and  in  unrestricted  reciprocity  between 
Canada  and  the  United  States.  Another  factor  in  his  influential  work  in  behalf 
of  provincial  interests  was  the  Vancouver  Guardian,  of  which  he  was  editor  and 
owner  in  1907. 

In  September,  1881,  Mr.  Martin  was  united  in  marriage  to  Mrs.  Elizabeth 
Jane  Eaton,  the  widow  of  George  W.  Eaton,  of  Ottawa,  and  the  second  daughter 
of  the  late  Edward  Reilly,  of  Richmond,  Ontario.  On  the  I3th  of  February, 
1913,  Mrs.  Martin,  after  an  illness  of  several  months,  passed  away  and  was  laid 
to  rest  in  Ottawa.  Mr.  Martin  is  in  sympathy  with  all  those  improvements  and 
projects  which  work  for  the  betterment  of  the  individual  and  for  the  community. 
He  belongs  to  the  National  Liberal  Club  of  London  and  also  to  the  Royal  Auto- 
mobile Club  of  London,  to  the  Vancouver  Club  and  the  Terminal  City  Club  of 
Vancouver.  He  has  been  characterized  by  the  Victoria  World  as  "an  able  and 
lucid  speaker,"  and  by  the  Toronto  Globe  as  "a  natural  born  politician."  Like  all 
who  are  most  prominent  in  political  circles,  he  has  had  strong  opposition  but  has 
ever  adhered  closely  to  the  course  which  he  has  believed  to  be  right,  standing 
strongly  in  support  of  principles  which  he  deems  most  essential  in  good  govern- 
ment. He  is  widely  known  in  eastern,  central  and  western  Canada  and  upon  all 
vital  questions  keeps  abreast  with  the  thinking  men  of  the  age,  being  recognized 
as  one  who  has  done  much  to  mold  public  thought  and  action  and  promote 
progressive  political  activity. 


HUGH  MCDONALD. 

The  lumber  and  timber  industry  of  British  Columbia  finds  in  Hugh  McDon- 
ald a  man  who  has  in  an  influential  way  been  connected  with  that  business  for 
a  number  of  years  and  is  also  identified  with  numerous  other  corporations  which 
have  greatly  promoted  the  commercial  growth  of  the  province.  He  was  born 
in  Oban,  Argyleshire,  Scotland,  on  March  10,  1860,  and  is  a  son  of  Alexander 
and  Ann  (McCall)  McDonald,  the  former  a  native  of  Callander,  Scotland,  and 
the  latter  of  the  island  of  Mull,  that  country.  Alexander  McDonald  was  prom- 
inent in  industrial  circles  of  his  native  land  as  proprietor  of  a  woolen  mill  and 
also  owned  a  valuable  estate  of  five  hundred  acres  there.  In  1880  he  sold  his 
holdings  and  came  to  British  Columbia,  his  son  Hugh  having  preceded  him  there 
by  about  two  years.  On  his  arrival  here  the  father  located  on  a  ranch  of  a 
thousand  acres,  which  was  then  owned  by  our  subject  and  is  situated  at  Lake 
Nipissing,  where  the  father  passed  away  at  the  advanced  age  of  eighty  years. 

Hugh  McDonald  was  reared  under  the  parental  roof  and  acquired  his  educa- 
tion at  the  Free  Church  Academy  in  Edinburgh,  Scotland,  completing  his  school- 
ing in  1875.  He  was  then  apprenticed  to  the  carpenter's  trade  for  a  five  years' 


HUGH  MCDONALD 


BRITISH    COLUMBIA  345 

apprenticeship,  his  compensation  being  five  shillings  per  week  and  board.  Be- 
coming, however,  discontent  with  the  slow  prospect  of  success,  he  ran  away 
after  having  remained  for  three  years  in  that  connection  and  came  to  Canada, 
locating  in  the  Nipissing  district,  where  he  took  up  six  hundred  and  forty  acres 
of  land  in  his  own  and  his  brother's  name.  His  aggressive  spirit  and  energy 
showed  itself  early,  for  he  set  out  with  the  decision  to  improve  his  fortune,  which 
is  rare  in  one  so  young.  Building  a  house,  barn  and  other  farm  buildings,  he 
purchased  stock  and  gave  his  sole  attention  to  his  farming  activities,  laying  there- 
by the  corner  stone  to  his  present  fortune.  This  ranch  today  is  one  of  the  most 
valuable  in  that  part  of  the  province,  comprising  about  twelve  hundred  acres  and 
is  now  owned  by  our  subject's  brother  Alexander,  Hugh  McDonald  having 
transferred  the  ranch  to  his  father  on  the  latter's  arrival  here.  Discontinuing 
farm  work,  he  then  engaged  in  work  for  J.  R.  Booth,  the  now  well  known  mil- 
lionaire lumber  king  of  Ottawa  and  the  largest  timber  land  holder  in  Canada. 
Mr.  McDonald  remained  with  Mr.  Booth  for  the  period  of  eleven  years,  begin- 
ning at  the  bottom  rung  of  the  ladder,  until  he  became  superintendent  of  the 
Timiscamaugue  branch  of  Mr.  Booth's  extensive  lumber  interests.  At  the  end 
of  that  period  Mr.  McDonald  came  to  British  Columbia  with  the  late  John 
Wilson,  taking  charge  of  the  logging  and  brush  work  of  the  Brunette  Saw  Mills 
and  subsequently  becoming  a  stockholder  in  the  concern.  His  connection  with 
that  company  comprises  the  years  from  1890  until  1908,  Mr.  McDonald  having 
been  made  president  of  the  company  in  1896  and  continuing  in  that  capacity 
from  that  time  until  he  severed  his  connection  with  the  firm  in  1908.  Selling  his 
holdings,  he  then  built  the  Barnett  &  McDonald  mills  on  Lulu  Island,  which 
were  unfortunately  destroyed  by  fire  before  their  completion  in  1910.  He  then 
purchased  the  Independent  Shingle  Mills  in  New  Westminster  but  has  also  dis- 
posed of  this  interest,  selling  out  in  1912.  Mr.  McDonald  still  owns  various 
valuable  timber  tracts  throughout  the  province  and  is  connected  with  other  indus- 
trial and  commercial  enterprises,  serving  at  present  as  president  of  the  Pacific 
Chocolate  Company,  Ltd.,  of  New  Westminster;  as  trustee  of  the  New  West- 
minster Trust  Company;  as  president  of  the  British  North  America  Securities 
Corporation,  and  as  president  of  the  People's  Trust  Building  Company. 

In  1896  Mr.  McDonald  was  married  to  Miss  Sophia  Victoria  Bowes,  a  daugh- 
ter of  John  Bowes,  of  Lanark,  Ontario,  and  a  niece  of  Senator  Peter  McLaren. 
To  this  union  were  born  five  children,  of  whom  three  survive :  Hugh  Alexander, 
Roland  Eden  and  Ivan  Douglas.  Mr.  and  Mrs.  McDonald  are  devoted  members 
of  the  Presbyterian  church.  Fraternally  he  is  a  member  of  Royal  City  Lodge, 
No.  3,  I.  O.  O.  F. ;  an  apprenticed  member  of  King  Solomon  Lodge,  No.  17, 
A.  F.  &  A.  M. ;  and  a  member  of  Royal  Lodge,  No.  6,  K.  P.  As  the  years  have 
brought  him  prosperity  he  has  become  recognized  as  one  of  the  potent  forces  in 
industrial  expansion  in  New  Westminster  and  is  highly  respected  and  esteemed 
for  what  he  has  done  in  promoting  general  advancement.  The  prosperity  which 
has  come  to  him  is  well  merited,  for  it  has  been  brought  about  by  honorable 
methods  only  and  has  been  made  possible  by  characteristics  which  are  worthy 
of  the  highest  commendation.  Mr.  McDonald  has  not  only  witnessed  the  won- 
derful changes  which  have  converted  a  practically  uninhabited  country  into  a 
prosperous  populated  district  but  has  been  a  helpful  and  cooperant  factor  in 
bringing  about  the  transformation. 


JAMES  LOW. 

James  Low  has  resided  in  Vancouver  for  but  a  comparatively  brief  period  yet 
is  well  known  through  his  connection  with  one  of  the  oldest  established  business 
enterprises  of  the  city,  being  treasurer  of  the  British  Columbia  Permanent  Loan 
Company.  He  was  born  at  Uxbridge,  Ontario,  and  in  the  acquirement  of  his  edu- 
cation attended  the  public  schools  there  and  the  high  school  at  Markham,  Ontario, 


346  BRITISH    COLUMBIA 

from  which  he  was  graduated.  Subsequently  he  took  up  the  study  of  telegraphy 
and  began  operating  when  very  young,  as  his  father  was  station  master  at 
Uxbridge.  The  father  suffered  a  prolonged  illness  when  the  son  was  fifteen 
years  of  age  and  never  recovered,  passing  away  before  James  Low  reached  the 
age  of  sixteen.  As  he  was  serving  as  substitute  operator  and  station  master  dur- 
ing his  father's  absence  he  was  given  that  position  upon  his  father's  death.  How- 
ever, he  soon  resigned  and  entered  the  employ  of  the  Grand  Trunk  Railway  Com- 
pany, which  he  represented  for  ten  years  in  the  position  of  train  dispatcher.  On 
the  expiration  of  that  period  he  became  secretary  and  manager  of  the  Victoria 
Loan  &  Savings  Company  of  Lindsay,  Ontario,  which  position  he  held  for  sixteen 
years,  making  a  most  creditable  record  in  that  connection  as  his  long  continuance 
with  the  company  plainly  indicates.  He  resigned  this  position  in  the  spring  of 
1912  to  become  treasurer  of  the  British  Columbia  Permanent  Loan  Company 
at  Vancouver  and  has  since  performed  the  duties  incumbent  upon  him  in  that  posi- 
tion. While  connected  with  the  city  for  only  a  little  more  than  a  year  he  has 
already  gained  a  wide  acquaintance  and  his  sterling  worth  has  won  for  him  favor- 
able recognition. 

Mr.  Low  has  one  son,  Donald,  who  is  now  a  student  at  McGill  University.  In 
politics  Mr.  Low  is  a  conservative  in  principles,  yet  follows  an  independent  policy 
voting  according  to  the  dictates  of  his  judgment,  unbiased  by  party  ties.  He  held 
membership  with  the  Masons  and  the  Odd  Fellows  in  Ontario  and  he  belongs  to 
St.  John's  Presbyterian  church,  in  the  work  of  which  he  is  actively  and  helpfully 
interested,  being  now  superintendent  of  the  Sunday  school.  Starting  out  in  life 
for  himself  at  an  early  age,  he  has  made  continuous  progress  and  the  ability  which 
he  displays  promises  advancement  for  the  future. 


STEPHEN    NICHOLSON-JARRETT. 

Stephen  Nicholson- Jarrett,  who  since  January  i,  1907,  has  been  serving  in  a 
capable,  forceful  and  far-sighted  way  as  city  building  inspector  of  Vancouver, 
owes  much  of  his  success  in  the  conduct  of  his  responsible  office  to  his  many 
years  of  active  connection  with  the  contracting  and  building  business,  to  the 
knowledge  which  he  has  of  the  building  trade  in  all  of  its'  various  ramifications 
and  to  the  excellent  organizing  and  administrative  ability  which  has  dominated 
and  directed  all  the  activities  of  his  business  career.  He  was  born  in  Bridlington, 
Yorkshire,  England,  on  the  2/th  of  December,  1847,  ar>d  is  a  son  of  Benjamin 
and  Hannah  (Wilson)  Nicholson-Jarrett,  both  natives  of  Yorkshire.  The 
father  came  to  Canada  in  1850  and  settled  near  Toronto,  in  York  county,  Ontario, 
where  he  engaged  in  farming  until  1857,  when  he  moved  to  Queen's  Bush,  now 
Wellington  county,  where  he  continued  to  reside  until  1887.  In  that  year  he 
retired  from  active  business  life  and  moved  to  Calgary,  Alberta,  where  he  died 
in  June,  1908,  at  the  age  of  eighty-nine.  He  had  survived  his  wife  since  1903, 
her  death  occurring  in  Calgary  when  she  was  seventy-nine  years  of  age. 

Stephen  Nicholson-Jarrett  acquired  his  education  in  the  public  schools  of 
Ontario,  and  after  laying  aside  his  books  was  apprenticed  to  the  carpenter's  trade, 
serving  his  term  in  Wellington  county,  where  he  was  later  engaged  in  the  con- 
tracting business  on  his  own  account  for  a  period  of  fifteen  years.  In  1884  he 
went  to  Calgary,  Alberta,  then  merely  a  tent  town,  but  offering  unlimited  oppor- 
tunities to  a  far-sighted  and  discriminating  business  man.  There  Mr.  Nicholson- 
Jarrett  entered  into  partnership  with  Hon.  W.  H.  Gushing,  and  they  entered  the 
contracting  business,  erecting  in  the  fall  of  1885  and  the  spring  of  1886  the 
first  sash  and  door  factory  west  of  Winnipeg,  an  enterprise  which  Mr.  Gushing 
is  still  successfully  conducting.  The  association  was  dissolved  in  1888,  and  in 
January  of  the  following  year  Mr.  Nicholson-Jarrett  came  to  Vancouver,  where 
he  has  since  remained  an  honored  and  deservedly  respected  citizen.  He  resumed 
his  former  occupation  here,  but  in  the  following  summer  the  contractors  experi- 


BRITISH    COLUMBIA  347 

enced  their  first  labor  troubles,  and  they  proved  to  be  so  severe  that  he  turned 
his  attention  to  another  line  of  work,  accepting  a  position  as  superintendent  of 
the  sash  and  door  factory  belonging  to  George  Cassady  &  Company.  After  seven 
years'  connection  with  this  concern  he  resigned  his  position,  and  in  1896  became 
superintendent  of  the  factory  operated  by  the  Vane  Sash  &  Door  Company,  con- 
tinuing to  do  able,  constructive  and  reliable  work  until  .the  ist  of  January,  1907, 
when  he  accepted  the  position  of  city  building  inspector  of  Vancouver,  an  office 
which  he  still  holds.  Since  he  entered  upon  his  duties  practically  all  the  new 
and  modern  residences,  public  buildings  and  business  structures  which  make 
this  city  one  of  the  finest  and  most  attractive  in  this  part  of  the  Dominion,  have 
been  erected,  the  last  building  completed  before  he  assumed  control  having  been 
the  Molson's  Bank  on  Hastings  street,  now  one  of  the  older  and  smaller  of  the 
city's  business  blocks.  Each  year  of  his  able  service  has  witnessed  a  substantial 
increase  in  the  number  of  building  permits  issued  and  in  the  total  value  of  the 
buildings  erected,  as  is  evidenced  by  the  fact  that  in  1907,  when  he  took  office, 
one  thousand  seven  hundred  and  seventy-three  permits  were  granted,  the  value 
of  the  buildings  being  five  million  six  hundred  and  thirty-two  thousand  seven 
hundred  and  forty-four  dollars,  as  against  three  thousand  two  hundred  and 
twenty-one  permits  issued  in  1912,  for  buildings  aggregating  in  value  nineteen 
million  three  hundred  and  eighty-eight  thousand  three  hundred  and  twenty-two 
dollars.  The  city  of  Vancouver  began  to  grow  in  a  rapid  and  noticeable  fashion  in 
the  year  1902  and  that  same  year  witnessed  the  remarkable  increase  in  the 
number  of  buildings  erected — an  increase  which  has  steadily  continued  since  that 
time,  without  any  of  those  periods  of  depression  or  utter  stagnation  so  common 
in  other  Canadian  cities  and  in  the  cities  of  the  United  States.  Probably  no  other 
community  on  the  North  American  continent  can  boast  such  a  splendid  record  and 
a  great  deal  of  credit  for  this  gratifying  state  of  affairs  is  due  to  the  systematic, 
practical  and  discriminating  labors  of  the  present  building  inspector,  who  has 
introduced  many  needed  reforms  and  changes  in  methods  of  operation  in  the 
building  department,  and  who  in  the  six  years  of  his  service  has  ably  carried 
forward  the  work  which  he  found  so  well  begun.  All  during  his  active  career  he 
has  been  interested  in  building  and  in  the  promotion  of  building  activity,  and  he 
is  now  in  the  sixteenth  year  of  his  service  as  president  of  the  Pacific  Building 
Society,  of  which  he  was  one  of  the  founders.  This  is  a  cooperative  building 
association,  founded  on  the  fact  that  every  man  is  better  off  from  both  a  social 
and  financial  standpoint  when  he  owns  a  home  of  his  own,  and  it  has  been  of 
material  assistance  to  hundreds  of  people  of  Vancouver  by  making  it  possible 
for  them  to  purchase  land  and  erect  a  house  at  a  small  initial  expense.  Mr. 
Nicholson- Jarrett  is  also  vice  president  of  the  Masonic  Temple  Company,  owners 
of  the  Vancouver  Masonic  Temple,  and  he  has  held  that  office  since  the  organ- 
ization of  the  company. 

Mr.  Nicholson-Jarrett  has  been  twice  married.  In  Wellington  county,  Ontario, 
on  the  9th  of  June,  1873,  he  wedded  Miss  Catherine  Ghent,  a  native  of  that 
province  of  old  United  Empire  Loyalist  stock.  She  died  in  1904,  and  on  the 
1 8th  of  October,  in  the  following  year,  he  married  in  Vancouver,  Miss  Alma  Van 
Aken,  a  daughter  of  James  H.  Van  Aken,  a  pioneer  of  Coldwater,  Michigan, 
where  Mrs.  Nicholson-Jarrett  resided  previous  to  her  marriage. 

Mr.  Nicholson-Jarrett  has  always  given  a  stanch  allegiance  to  the  liberal 
party,  but  has  never  been  active  in  politics,  preferring  to  devote  all  of  his  atten- 
tion to  his  business  affairs.  The  office  which  he  now  holds  is  the  only  official 
position  in  which  he  has  ever  served,  but  the  excellent  record  he  has  made  indi- 
cates that  his  political  inactivity  has  been  a  great  loss  to  the  community  at  large. 
He  has  extensive  and  important  fraternal  affiliations,  being  especially  prominent 
in  the  Masonic  order,  which  he  joined  in  Calgary  in  1885,  and  in  which  he  has 
attained  the  thirty-second  degree.  He  is  past  master  of  Mount  Hermon  Lodge, 
No.  7,  A.  F.  &  A.  M.,  and  past  first  principal  in  Chapter  No.  98,  R.  A.  M.  He  is  a 
member  of  the  Wesley  Methodist  Episcopal  church,  of  which  he  has  been  trustee 
for  nearly  twenty  years,  his  upright  and  honorable  life  being  at  all  times  in 


348  BRITISH    COLUMBIA 

harmony  with  his  professions.  In  business  life  and  in  official  relations  he  has 
made  excellent  records,  both  characterized  by  far-sighted,  discriminating  and 
useful  work  and  during  the  period  of  his  residence  in  Vancouver  he  has  made 
tangible  and  substantial  contributions  to  its  growth  and  development. 


ROBERT  SCOTT  LENNIE. 

Robert  Scott  Lennie,  a  member  of  the  British  Columbia  bar  since  1898  and 
a  practitioner  in  Vancouver  since  1910,  has  lived  in  this  province  for  twenty- 
seven  years,  arriving  here  when  a  youth  of  eleven.  He  was  born  at  Smith  Falls, 
Ontario,  August  16,  1875,  and  is  a  son  of  the  Rev.  Robert  Lennie,  B.  D.,  and 
Catherine  (Harcus)  Lennie,  the  former  having  been  a  minister  at  Smith  Falls, 
Ontario,  at  the  time  of  the  birth  of  their  son.  At  the  usual  age  Robert  S.  Lennie 
entered  the  public  schools  and  as  the  family  removed  from  place  to  place  he 
continued  his  education  in  Ontario,  California  and  British  Columbia,  arriving  in 
this  province  in  1886.  His  literary  course  was  supplemented  by  preparation  for 
the  bar,  to  which  he  was  called  in  1898.  He  immediately  located  for  practice 
at  Nelson,  British  Columbia,  becoming  a  member  of  the  firm  of  Elliot  &  Lennie, 
while  later  the  firm  was  Lennie  &  Wragge.  This  connection  was  continued 
until  1912,  at  which  time  the  partnership  was  dissolved.  In  the  previous  year 
Mr.  Lennie  had  come  to  Vancouver  and  began  practice  alone  here,  although  still 
a  member  of  the  firm  of  Hamilton,  Lennie  &  Wragge  at  Nelson,  which  was 
formed  when  he  moved  to  Vancouver.  In  1911  he  was  joined  at  Vancouver 
by  J.  A.  Clark,  and  they  have  since  engaged  in  the  general  practice  of  law  under 
the  firm  name  of  Lennie  &  Clark.  Close  reasoning,  analytical  power  and  unfalt- 
ering industry  in  the  preparation  of  his  cases  have  been  the  potent  elements  in 
gaining  for  Mr.  Lennie  the  creditable  position  which  he  now  occupies  as  a  prac- 
titioner in  Vancouver.  He  is  also  widely  and  favorably  known  in  business  circles, 
being  an  officer  in  various  corporations,  especially  having  to  do  with  mining  and 
financial  interests.  He  is  president  of  the  Slocan  Star  Mines,  Limited;  a  direc- 
tor of  the  Forest  Mills  of  British  Columbia,  Limited;  of  the  Kootenay  Bonanza 
Mines,  Limited ;  a  director  of  the  Silver  King  Mines,  Limited ;  the  Colonial  Trust 
Company,  Limited;  the  New  British  Columbia  Lands,  Limited,  and  many  other 
corporations.  All  this  indicates  his  faith  in  the  province  and  its  natural  resources 
and  the  activity  he  is  displaying  in  the  development  of  the  northwest. 

Aside  from  this  Mr.  Lennie  is  very  active  in  political  circles.  He  is  a  con- 
servative and  was  president  of  the  Nelson  (B.  C.)  Conservative  Club  from  1904 
until  1910,  while  since  1908  he  has  been  president  of  the  Kootenay  District 
Conservative  Association,  comprising  nine  ridings.  His  interest  in  politics  is 
that  of  a  public-spirited  citizen,  who  desires  the  welfare  of  his  country,  and  not 
that  of  the  politician,  who  seeks  personal  recognition  and  gain.  In  fact,  Mr. 
Lennie  was  tendered  and  refused  the  nomination  for  mayor  of  Nelson  and  also 
for  the  provincial  and  Dominion  houses.  Appointed  by  order  of  the  lieutenant- 
governor  in  council,  he  acted  as  chairman  of  the  British  Columbia  Fire  Insurance 
Commission,  the  findings  of  which  were  reported  in  1910.  He  is  a  bencher  of 
the  Law  Society  of  British  Columbia,  representing  the  Kootenay  district  for 

six  years. 

On  the  igth  of  October,  1898,  in  New  Westminster,  British  Columbia,  Mr. 
Lennie  was  married  to  Miss  Edith  Louise  Douglas,  daughter  of  Benjamin  and 
Julia  A.  Douglas,  pioneer  settlers  of  the  northwest,  her  father  having  been  one 
of  the  originators  of  the  British  Columbia  Electric  Railway  Company.  The 
children  of  this  marriage  are  Robert  Douglas,  Gerald  Scott  and  Edith  Beatrice 
Catharine.  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Lennie  are  members  of  the  Presbyterian  church  and 
in  club  circles  he  is  well  known.  He  belongs  to  the  Nelson  Club  of  Nelson, 
British  Columbia,  and  the  Union  Club  of  Victoria,  while  in  Vancouver  his 
membership  is  with  the  Vancouver,  Jericho  Country,  Shaughnessy  Heights  Golf, 


ROBERT  S.  LENNIE 


BRITISH    COLUMBIA  351 

Commercial  and  Progress  Clubs.  These  organizations  not  only  have  as  their 
object  social  interests  and  pleasures  but  also  are  concerned  with  plans  for  the 
improvement  and  benefit  of  the  city,  all  of  which  Mr.  Lennie  heartily  indorses 
and  as  time  permits  he  gives  thereto  his  hearty  cooperation.  The  family  resi- 
dence is  on  Matthews  avenue,  Shaughnessy  Heights,  Vancouver,  British 
Columbia. 


BERTRAM  WILLIAM   DIGBY  GILLIES,  M.  D. 

Dr.  Bertram  William  Digby  Gillies  has  since  1906  been  engaged  in  the  prac- 
tice of  medicine  at  Vancouver  and  for  the  past  six  years  has  been  pathologist  to 
the  Vancouver  General  Hospital.  He  was  born  at  Teeswater,  Ontario,  June  n, 
1875,  a  son  of  Dr.  John  and  Fannie  (Midford)  Gillies,  the  former  a  native  of 
Ontario  and  the  latter  of  England.  The  father  practiced  medicine  at  Teeswater 
for  more  than  forty  years,  but  both  he  and  his  wife  are  now  deceased. 

In  the  acquirement  of  his  education  Dr.  Gillies  attended  successively  the 
Harriston  high  school,  the  Toronto  University  and  the  McGill  Medical  College, 
from  which  he  was  graduated  in  1898.  He  was  then  interne  in  the  Royal  Vic- 
toria Hospital  of  Montreal  for  three  years,  and  subsequently  took  up  post- 
graduate work  abroad,  studying  in  Germany,  Austria,  France  and  England  for 
two  years,  during  which  time  he  gained  comprehensive  knowledge  of  the  methods 
of  many  of  the  most  eminent  physicians  of  the  old  world.  Splendidly  qualified  by 
study  and  practical  experience  for  the  onerous  and  responsible  duties  of  the 
profession,  he  returned  to  Canada,  and  was  appointed  acting  pathologist  to  the 
General  Hospital  at  Montreal,  in  which  connection  he  continued  for  two  years. 
In  1906  he  came  to  Vancouver,  where  he  opened  an  office  and  has  since  engaged 
in  practice. 

On  the  i6th  of  April,  1906,  at  Montreal,  Dr.  Gillies  was  married  to  Miss  Mar- 
garet Leckie,  a  daughter  of  Major  R.  G.  Leckie,  of  Sudbury,  Ontario.  They  have 
two  children,  Margaret  Elizabeth  and  Mary  Eleanor.  Dr.  Gillies  belongs  to  the 
Western  Club,  the  Deutscher  Club  and  the  Rotary  Club,  associations  which  indi- 
cate his  appreciation  for  the  social  amenities  of  life.  He  is  imbued  in  all  that  he 
does  professionally  by  a  laudable  ambition  that  prompts  him  to  put  forth  his  best 
efforts,  and  he  is  making  steady  advancement  in  his  chosen  calling. 


JOHN   O.   BENWELL. 

John  O.  Benwell  is  at  the  head  of  the  well  known  house  of  Benwell,  Peart  & 
Company,  importers  and  wholesale  dealers  in  liquors  and  cigars  at  Vancouver. 
He  was  born  at  Blackheath,  Kent,  England,  on  the  9th  of  August,  1865,  and  is  a 
son  of  John  P.  and  Elizabeth  Benwell,  the  former  lately  general  manager  of 
Lloyds  Bank,  Ltd.,  of  London.  Liberal  educational  advantages  were  afforded 
the  son,  and  after  attending  .Malvern  College  in  Worcestershire,  England,  he 
entered  the  Bank  of  British  North  America,  in  London,  in  1882.  His  initial 
business  experience  was  received  in  this  connection  during  the  succeeding  four 
years,  and  in  1886  he  came  to  Canada,  attracted  by  the  broader  opportunities 
of  the  new  world.  The  year  1888  witnessed  his  arrival  in  British  Columbia, 
and  after  ten  years'  residence  in  this  province  he  established  his  present  business 
in  1898,  organizing  the  firm  of  Benwell,  Peart  &  Company,  wholesale  dealers  in 
wines  and  spirits.  They  handle  the  products  of  the  leading  distilleries  of  the 
country  and  imported  wines  and  liquors,  and  the  volume  of  business  transacted 
makes  theirs  one  of  the  large  commercial  enterprises  of  the  city. 

In  1891  Mr.  Benwell  was  united  in  marriage  to  Miss  Helen  E.  Boultbee,  of 
Vancouver,  and  they  have  one  daughter,  their  only  son  having  been  drowned 


352 

in  a  collision  between  the  Princess  Victoria  and  the  Chehalis  in  Vancouver  harbor, 
on  July  21,  1896.  Mr.  Benwell  finds  recreation  in  hunting  and  shooting  and  he 
has  membership  in  all  athletic  clubs  and  also  with  the  Vancouver,  Terminal  City 
and  Country  Clubs. 


SANFORD  JOHNSON  CROWE. 

Sanford  Johnson  Crowe  through  association  with  the  contracting  business 
has  taken  active  part  in  the  substantial  upbuilding  of  Vancouver.  He  is  now 
practically  living  retired.  His  attention,  however,  is  given  to  his  personal  invest- 
ments, which  include  good  dividend-bearing  properties.  As  the  years  have  gone 
by  he  has  won  substantial  success,  his  indefatigable  energy  and  capable  manage- 
ment enabling  him  to  overcome  all  obstacles  and  difficulties  and  reach  a  posi- 
tion among  the  men  of  affluence  in  Vancouver.  He  was  born  at  Truro,  Nova 
Scotia,  February  14,  1868,  his  parents  being  John  S.  and  Rebecca  (Fulton) 
Crowe,  the  former  a  son  of  Jasper  Crowe,  who  was  a  native  of  north  Ireland 
but  came  to  Canada  about  1810  and  settled  at  Onslow,  Colchester  county,  Nova 
Scotia,  where  he  engaged  in  farming  until  his  death.  His  son,  John  S.  Crowe, 
was  born  and  reared  on  his  father's  farm  and  was  apprenticed  in  his  youth  to 
the  carpenter's  and  shipbuilder's  trades  at  Truro.  He  afterward  followed  build- 
ing and  contracting  at  that  place  until  1895,  when  he  retired  and  came  to  Van- 
couver, where  he  remained  until  his  death,  in  September,  1910.  He  married 
Rebecca  Fulton,  who  was  descended  from  one  of  four  brothers  of  that  name 
who  came  from  Scotland  to  America  in  1800.  Two  of  these  brothers  settled  in 
Nova  Scotia  and  two  in  New  York.  Of  the  two  latter  one  was  Robert  Fulton, 
who  in  the  early  part  of  the  nineteenth  century  invented  the  first  steamboat. 
When  he  advanced  his  idea  he  was  laughed  at  for  his  pains,  none  believing  steam 
could  be  applied  to  navigation,  but  with  courageous  spirit  he  worked  on  until 
an  interested  crowd  witnessed  his  first  trip  up  the  river  to  Philadelphia  and  his 
inventive  genius  and  ability  then  found  recognition.  George  Fulton  was  one 
of  the  two  brothers  who  settled  in  Nova  Scotia,  taking  up  his  abode  in  Colchester 
county,  where  he  rose  to  a  position  of  prominence.  His  son  and  namesake, 
George  Fulton,  Jr.,  was  born  in  Colchester  county,  where  he  spent  his  entire 
life.  It  was  his  daughter,  Rebecca,  also  a  native  of  Colchester  county,  who 
became  the  wife  of  John  S.  Crowe  and  the  mother  of  Sanford  J.  Crowe. 

In  the  public  schools  of  Truro,  Nova  Scotia,  Sanford  J.  Crowe  pursued  his 
education  and  later  was  apprenticed  to  the  carpenter's  trade,  at  which  he  served 
from  1883  until  1885.  Subsequently  he  was  in  the  employ  of  Thomas  Dunne  & 
Company,  of  Truro,  with  whom  he  remained  until  1888,  when  he  came  to  British 
Columbia,  settling  at  Vancouver,  where  he  took  up  the  carpenter's  trade.  He 
was  thus  engaged  as  a  journeyman  carpenter  until  1901,  at  which  time,  in  part- 
nership with  Charles  H.  Wilson,  he  embarked  in  the  contracting  and  building 
business  under  the  firm  name  of  Crowe  &  Wilson.  They  met  with  success  in 
that  undertaking,  many  important  contracts  being  awarded  them,  while  various 
substantial  structures  of  this  city  still  stand  as  monuments  to  their  ability  and 
enterprise.  They  continued  to  prosper  as  the  years  passed  on  and  conducted  an 
extensive  and  gratifying  business  until  1908,  when  both  parties  practically  retired 
from  active  connection  with  the  business  although  the  firm  remains  intact.  Both 
Mr.  Crowe  and  Mr.  Wilson  now  devote  their  attention  largely  to  looking  after 
their  common  and  private  interests.  The  former  has  become  a  large  owner  of 
realty  and  also  has  other  private  business  and  financial  connections.  As  a  con- 
tractor he  saw  opportunity  for  judicious  investments  and  from  time  to  time 
added  to  his  holdings  until  he  now  derives  a  gratifying  annual  income  therefrom. 
In  1905  he  was  one  of  the  organizers  of  the  Cascade  Steam  Laundry  Company. 
Ltd.,  of  which  he  is  the  secretary-treasurer.  He  also  has  other  financial  interests 


SANFORD  J.  CROWE 


BRITISH    COLUMBIA  355 

and  for  the  past  two  years  has  been  vice  president  and  active  in  the  affairs  of 
the  Vancouver  Exhibition  Association. 

,Mr.  Crowe  was  appointed  in  July  to  represent  the  city  of  Vancouver  on  the 
board  of  the  Burrard  Peninsula  Sewerage  Commission,  also  known  as  the  Greater 
Vancouver  Sewer  Commission,  which  was  created  by  the  government  at  the  last 
session  of  the  legislature  and  will  begin  their  work  August  i,  1913.  In  speaking 
of  Mr.  Crowe  as  one  of  the  members  of  the  new  commission,  Attorney-General 
Bowser  refers  to  him  as  being  in  a  class  by  himself,  and  having  had  years  of  wide 
experience  in  sewer  construction  in  Vancouver,  he  is  indispensible  to  the  board. 
Ever  since  the  provisional  board  was  conceived  nearly  two  years  ago  Mr.  Crowe 
has  taken  a  very  active  part  and  always  been  a  sincere  worker  for  the  establish- 
ment of  a  permanent  commission  to  conduct  this  much-needed  work. 

On  the  1 9th  of  March,  1901,  in  Vancouver,  Mr.  Crowe  was  united  in  mar- 
riage to  Miss  Annie  C.  Smythe,  a  daughter  of  Richard  Smythe,  a  minister  and 
farmer  of  Bathurst,  New  Brunswick.  Mrs.  Crowe  passed  away  April  29, 
1912,  leaving  two  children,  Richard  Elmer  and  Harold  Stinson.  In  politics 
Mr.  Crowe  is  a  liberal,  taking  active  and  helpful  part  in  support  of  the  party, 
and  since  1909  has  served  as  alderman  of  the  city,  his  term  expiring  in  1914.  He 
belongs  to  the  Terminal  City  Club  and  to  the  Presbyterian  church.  He  has  ever 
been  interested  in  matters  pertaining  to  the  growth,  development,  welfare  and 
progress  of  Vancouver  and  for  a  number  of  years  he  was  a  member  of  the 
board  of  managers  of  the  Vancouver  General  Hospital.  He  takes  active  and 
helpful  interest  in  all  that  pertains  to  general  progress  and  has  been  generous  in 
his  support  of  measures  to  ameliorate  the  hard  conditions  of  life  for  the  unfort- 
unate. What  he  has  undertaken  he  has  accomplished  and  while  he  stands  today 
among  the  successful  business  men  of  Vancouver  he  has  never  concentrated  his 
attention  upon  business  affairs  to  the  exclusion  of  other  duties,  recognizing  fully 
his  obligations  to  his  fellowmen  and  to  the  community  at  large. 


BLANCHARD  E.  NEVILLE. 

One  of  the  leading  productive  industries  of  Vancouver  is  conducted  under  the 
name  of  the  Dominion  Fish  Company,  Ltd.,  with  Blanchard  E.  Neville  as  presi- 
dent. Careful  management,  a  utilization  of  all  the  opportunities  which  have  come 
to  him  and  thorough  reliability  have  been  the  salient  features  in  his  life  record 
and  have  gained  for  him  the  enviable  position  which  he  now  occupies  in  the 
business  circles  of  his  adopted  city.  He  was  born  in  Nova  Scotia,  in  1878,  a  son 
of  E.  H.  and  Mary  (Adams)  Neville,  both  of  whom  were  natives  of  that  province. 
About  1893  they  removed  westward  to  Winnipeg,  where  they  still  reside. 

Blanchard  E.  Neville  was  a  student  at  Dalhousie  College,  in  Halifax,  Nova 
Scotia,  where  he  was  graduated  with  the  class  of  1901.  He  then  went  west  to 
Winnipeg  and  entered  the  employ  of  the  Canadian  Pacific  Railway  Company, 
spending  the  first  year  in  the  office  of  the  accountant  of  the  sleeping  and  dining 
car  department,  and  afterward  going  upon  the  road  as  inspector  in  the  same 
department.  He  traveled  from  Halifax  to  Vancouver  and  continued  in  that 
position  until  April,  1908,  when  he  retired  to  engage  in  business  on  his  own 
account.  He  bought  out  the  Dominion  Fish  Company,  Ltd.,  of  which  he  is 
president  and  manager,  and  although  this  business  came  into  his  possession  only 
in  1908  it  had  been  established  for  many  years  and  is  the  oldest  wholesale  fish 
enterprise  in  British  Columbia.  By  far  the  greater  part  of  the  output  is  shipped 
outside  of  the  province,  being  distributed  throughout  Alberta,  Saskatchewan, 
Manitoba  and  Ontario,  while  shipments  are  made  as  far  east  as  Toronto.  The 
first  carload  of  fish  to  leave  British  Columbia  was  sent  out  by  this  company  in 
1913 — a  load  of  fresh  halibut.  They  also  supply  the  majority  of  retail  markets 
in  Vancouver  and  the  province  and  have  the  largest  fish  smoking  plant  on  the 
Pacific  coast,  in  the  busy  season  smoking  from  nine  to  ten  tons  of  fish  per  day. 


356  BRITISH    COLUMBIA 

These  are  packed  in  their  large  plant  under  the  registered  name  of  the  Dominion 
Brand  and  are  shipped  through  brokers  to  all  countries.  The  business  has  grown 
year  by  year  until  it  has  reached  mammoth  proportions,  making  it  one  of  the 
chief  productive  industries  of  the  city.  In  1910  Mr.  Neville  was  joined  by  his 
brother,  W.  S.  Neville,  formerly  of  Winnipeg,  who  is  now  secretary  of  the 
company.  The  plant  is  splendidly  equipped  for  carrying  on  the  work  in  all  of  its 
departments  and  a  large  force  of  employes  assist  in  salting,  smoking  and  pre- 
paring the  fish  for  the  market. 

On  the  8th  of  April,  1909,  Mr.  Neville  was  married  in  Vancouver  to  Miss 
Margaret  Bunn,  a  daughter  of  Alfred  Bunn,  a  well  known  pioneer  of  this  city 
who  came  from  Manitoba.  They  have  one  child,  Edwina.  In  politics  Mr. 
Neville  is  a  conservative,  but  has  never  taken  an  active  part  in  political  affairs. 
He  is  interested  in  the  game  of  baseball,  and  for  two  years  was  manager  of  the 
Winnipeg  baseball  team.  He  belongs  to  Vancouver  Lodge,  B.  P.  O.  E.,  and  to 
the  Canadian  Order  of  Foresters,  and  his  religious  faith  is  that  of  the  Methodist 
church.  He  is  a  member  of  the  Commercial  Club.  His  interests  in  life  are  varied 
and  he  is  always  loyal  to  any  cause  which  he  espouses.  His  advancement  in  the 
business  world  is  the  merited  reward  of  ability  and  fidelity,  and  indicates  what 
may  be  accomplished  when  energy  and  determination  are  basic  elements  in  one's 
career. 


JOHN  McLELLAN  MACKINNON. 

British  Columbia  is  endowed  with  splendid  natural  resources,  and  conse- 
quently there  has  come  to  this  section  of  the  country  a  class  of  enterprising  men 
who  recognize  the  advantages  here  offered  and  in  the  capable  control  of  busi- 
ness affairs  have  not  only  contributed  to  individual  success  but  have  been  factors 
in  the  substantial  improvement  and  upbuilding  of  the  country.  To  this  class 
belongs  John  McLellan  Mackinnon,  investment  broker  of  Vancouver,  who  has 
labored  along  many  lines  that  have  been  of  substantial  benefit  to  this  section  of 
the  country.  He  was  born  on  the  island  of  Eigg  in  Inverness-shire,  Scotland, 
September  i,  1863,  a  son  of  Charles  and  Mary  (McLellan)  Mackinnon.  The 
father  was  connected  with  the  geodetic  survey  department  of  the  admiralty  for 
a  number  of  years,  or  until  his  retirement  from  active  life. 

In  the  acquirement  of  his  education  John  M.  Mackinnon  attended  the  public 
schools  and  the  Watts  Institute  of  Edinburgh,  and  when  a  young  man  of  twenty- 
two  years  arrived  in  British  Columbia  in  1885.  ^n  the  fall  of  that  year  he  went 
to  Oregon,  in  the  United  States,  where  he  engaged  in  sheep  ranching  for  six 
years,  and  then  returned  to  this  province  and  initiated  his  career  in  the  land  and 
timber  business  in  which  he  has  continued  to  be  actively  interested  to  the  present 
time.  In  1891  he  purchased  Hardy  island  comprising  one  thousand  six  hundred 
and  ninety-nine  acres  which  he  devoted  to  the  preservation  of  game,  being  one 
of  the  first  men  in  the  province  to  promote  the  protection  of  game  on  private 
preserves.  This  island  remains  in  his  possession  to  the  present  time  and  is  still 
devoted  to  its  original  purpose.  Mr.  Mackinnon  has  been  actively  connected 
with  the  development  of  mines,  timber  and  the  natural  resources  of  the  country 
generally  for  the  past  twenty  years  and  his  labors  have  been  an  element  in  the 
substantial  growth  of  the  province,  while  at  the  same  time  his  careful  control 
of  his  individual  interests  has  brought  the  success  which  numbers  him  among 
Vancouver's  substantial  residents. 

In  1897  he  erected  the  Mackinnon  building  in  Vancouver  which  was  the 
first  office  building  of  any  importance  to  be  built  in  that  city  and  which,  at  that 
time,  was  considered  the  most  modern  building  in  the  city.  Besides  his  personal 
interests,  Mr.  Mackinnon  has  been  a  director  in  numerous  business  companies 
and  corporations.  In  1906  he  organized  the  business  and  built  the  plant  of  the 
Canadian  Pacific  Pulp  Company,  Ltd.,  at  Swanson  Bay,  British  Columbia,  and 


JOHN  M.  MACKINNON 


BRITISH    COLUMBIA  359 

was  managing  director  of  the  company  for  six  years  and  in  that  connection 
developed  a  business  of  large  proportions.  He  is  heavily  interested  in  mining 
and  timber  lands  in  different  sections  of  the  province,  being  the  owner  of  more 
than  twenty  thousand  acres  of  timber  land  on  the  coast  of  British  Columbia.  He 
also  has  extensive  holdings  in  farm  and  fruit  lands,  among  other  properties 
being  a  ranch  of  one  thousand  two  hundred  acres  in  the  Lillooet  district,  which 
is  devoted  primarily  to  horse  and  cattle  raising,  while  three  hundred  acres  are 
under  cultivation. 

Mr.  JVlackinnon  has  recently  been  commissioned  a  justice  of  the  peace  in 
the  province,  this  being  the  only  public  office  he  has  ever  filled.  His  political 
belief  is  that  of  the  conservative  party.  He  is  a  member  of  the  Vancouver  Club, 
the  Royal  Vancouver  Yacht  Club  and  is  a  life  member  of  the  London  Inverness- 
shire  Association  of  London,  England,  one  of  the  most  exclusive  associations  in 
Great  Britain.  He  is  a  life  member  of  the  Vancouver  Rowing  Club.  He  is  a 
member  of  the  Vancouver  Board  of  Trade  and  is  in  sympathy  with  all  its  efforts 
to  promote  the  business  interests  of  the  city,  to  extend  its  trade  relations,  to 
exploit  its  natural  advantages  and  enhance  its  beauty.  In  a  word,  he  is  a  public- 
spirited  citizen,  cooperating  in  various  measures  for  the  general  welfare. 

On  the  2ist  of  June,  1894,  in  Vancouver,  Mr.  Mackinnon  was  married  to 
Miss  Jean  McGregor  Grant,  a  daughter  of  Captain  Alexander  and  Isabel  Drys- 
dale  (Dodds)  Grant.  Her  father  was  for  many  years  connected  with  the  local 
navy  reserves  in  New  Zealand  but  is  now  retired.  The  children  of  this  marriage 
are  Charles  Donald  Grant,  Isabel  Mary  and  Ian  Malcolm.  The  religious  faith  of 
the  family  is  that  of  the  Presbyterian  church. 

It  is  a  matter  of  interesting  history  to  know  that  Mr.  Mackinnon  purchased 
the  first  ticket  the  Canadian  Pacific  Railroad  ever  sold  in  Edinburgh,  Scotland, 
to  Victoria,  British  Columbia.  The  railroad,  however,  was  unable  to  get  him 
'through  and  so  transferred  him  in  New  York  and  he  came  to  this  province  by 
way  of  the  Northern  Pacific  and  over  the  line  of  the  Oregon  Railway  &  Navi- 
gation Company,  the  Canadian  Pacific  not  having  been  completed  until  the  fol- 
lowing year.  For  more  than  a  quarter  of  a  century  Mr.  Mackinnon  has  been  a 
witness  of  the  development  of  the  northwest,  living  continuously  in  British 
Columbia,  save  for  the  brief  period  spent  in  Oregon,  and  he  takes  just  pride  in 
what  has  been  accomplished  in  this  most  western  of  the  Canadian  provinces,  the 
transformation  being  so  great  as  to  appear  almost  magical  when  one  recognizes 
how  sparsely  settled  was  this  section  in  1885 — the  year  of  his  arrival. 


HERBERT   WILLIAM    BAKER. 

Industry  and  intelligence  constitute  the  key  which  unlocks  the  portals  of  suc- 
cess. These  qualities  may  be  cultivated  by  any  and  thus  the  opportunity  for 
business  advancement  is  open  to  all.  Not  all,  however,  preserve  in  the  perform- 
ance of  the  task  to  which  they  set  themselves  and  thus  develop  their  latent  powers 
and  talents.  Determined  to  win  success  by  persistent,  honorable  effort,  Herbert 
William  Baker  has  constantly  advanced,  and  since  1905  has  been  secretary  and 
treasurer  of  the  Pacific  Loan  Company,  which  he  organized  in  that  year.  The 
following  year  he  organized  the  Northern  Securities,  Limited,  and  has  since  been 
its  president,  bending  his  energies  to  the  accomplishment  of  the  purpose  for 
which  the  two  companies  stand.  He  was  born  in  Kingston,  Ontario,  July  24, 
1869,  and  is  a  son  of  William  Ford  and  Frances  (Funnell)  Baker.  The  former 
was  descended  from  an  old  family  of  United  Empire  Loyalists  who  came  from  the 
New  England  colonies  and  settled  in  Prince  Edward  county,  Ontario,  at  the  time 
of  the  American  revolution.  He  was  later  a  prominent  merchant  of  Trenton, 
Ontario,  for  many  years,  and  in  1902  made  his  way  westward  to  Portage  la 
Prairie,  Manitoba,  where  he  engaged  in  general  business  and  farming,  owning 
and  cultivating  a  tract  of  land  of  six  hundred  and  forty  acres  within  the  limits  of 


360  BRITISH    COLUMBIA 

that  city.    Thereon  he  resided  until  his  death  in  1909,  while  his  wife  had  passed 
away  in  the  previous  year. 

In  the  public  schools  of  Trenton,  Ontario,  Herbert  W.  Baker  mastered  the 
preliminary  branches  of  learning,  while  his  more  advanced  course  was  pursued 
in  Queen's  University  at  Kingston,  Ontario,  where  he  was  graduated  in  1891, 
winning  the  Bachelor  of  Arts  degree.  He  took  up  the  profession  of  teaching  at 
the  collegiate  institute  at  Glencoe,  Ontario,  where  he  remained  as  an  instructor 
until  1895.  He  then  went  to  Portage  la  Prairie  to  become  science  master  of  the 
collegiate  institute  there,  and  subsequently  was  made  principal  of  that  collegiate 
and  superintendent  of  the  Portage  la  Prairie  schools,  in  which  position  he  con- 
tinued until  1902,  being  recognized  as  a  prominent  and  active  factor  in  the  educa- 
tional development  of  that  section. 

On  coming  to  Vancouver  in  1902,  Mr.  Baker  entered  business  circles  as  a 
representative  of  the  Great  West  Life  Insurance  Company,  with  which  he  was 
connected  for  two  years.  He  then  engaged  in  the  general  real-estate  and  financial 
brokerage  business,  and  in  1905  organized  the  Pacific  Loan  Company,  of  which 
he  became  secretary  arid  treasurer,  remaining  in  the  dual  position  to  the  present 
time.  He  further  extended  his  activities  in  1906  in  the  organization  of  the  North- 
ern Securities,  Limited,  of  which  he  has  since  been  the  president.  These  two  com- 
panies conduct  a  general  real-estate,  loan,  insurance  and  financial  brokerage  busi- 
ness, act  as  executors,  administrators  and  trustees,  and  do  other  work  of  similar 
nature.  They  have  been  established  upon  a  safe,  substantial  basis,  and  are  con- 
ducting a  growing  and  profitable  business.  The  plans  of  the  two  companies  have 
been  carefully  formulated  and  embody  in  large  part  the  ideas  and  business  man- 
agement of  Mr.  Baker,  who  has  acquainted  himself  with  every  phase  of  the 
financial  situation  of  the  northwest,  and  is  equally  well  known  for  his  correct 
valuation  of  property.  In  fact  he  is  well  qualified  to  handle  any  branch  of  the, 
business  and  his  discernment  and  sagacity  have  constituted  important  features 
in  his  success. 

On  the  I4th  of  June,  1898,  Mr.  Baker  was  married  at  Portage  la  Prairie  to 
Miss  Charlotte  Richardson,  a  daughter  of  William  R.  Richardson,  of  Kingston, 
Ontario,  and  their  children  are  Donald,  Wallace,  Helen,  Gordon  and  Russell.  The 
parents  hold  membership  in  the  Methodist  church  and  Mr.  Baker  votes  with  the 
liberal  party.  There  is  no  esoteric  phase  in  all  of  his  life  history;  his  record 
being  an  open  book  that  all  may  read.  At  the  outset  of  his  career  he  realized 
the  fact  that  there  is  no  royal  road  to  wealth.  A  noted  financier  has  said :  "If 
you  would  win  success,  you  must  be  willing  to  pay  the  price — the  price  of  self- 
sacrifice,  earnest  effort  and  diligence ;"  and  this  Mr.  Baker  has  done,  gaining  for 
himself  a  creditable  and  honorable  position  among  the  well  and  favorably  known 
business  men  of  Vancouver. 


DONALD  NEIL  McTAVISH. 

Donald  Neil  McTavish,  sole  proprietor  of  the  real-estate,  insurance  and  loan 
business  operated  under  the  name  of  McTavish  Brothers,  was  born  in  Beeton, 
Ontario,  on  the  2d  of  October,  18/8,  and  is  a  son  of  Peter  and. Margaret  (Mac- 
Millan)  McTavish,  both  representatives  of  old  Scotch  families.  He  acquired 
his  education  in  the  public  schools  of  Manitoba  and  British  Columbia  coming 
to  the  latter  province  in  1889  and  afterward  taught  school  in  Fraser  Valley  and 
Rossland,  British  Columbia,  following  this  occupation  from  1897  to  I9°2-  Dur- 
ing some  of  this  time  he  was  principal  of  the  South  Ward  school  in  Rossland 
but  he  eventually  resigned  this  position  in  order  to  enter  the  employ  of  the 
International  Correspondence  Schools  of  Scranton,  Pennsylvania,  in  whose 
interests  he  worked  for  seven  years  in  British  Columbia.  In  the  spring  of 
1910  he  came  to  Vancouver  and  here  identified  himself  with  the  real-estate, 
insurance  and  loan  business,  forming  a  partnership  with  his  brother  Peter  D. 


DONALD  N.  McTAVISH 


BRITISH    COLUMBIA  363 

McTavish  under  the  firm  name  of  McTavish  Brothers.  They  dissolved  part- 
nership in  1911,  but  Donald  N.  McTavish  still  uses  the  old  firm  title.  He  con- 
trols a  large  and  important  trade  and  his  success  has  come  as  a  natural  result 
of  the  able  management  of  his  business,  his  ability,  energy  and  practical  judg- 
ment. He  is  a  director  in  the  Western  Residential  Schools  of  Vancouver  and 
in  the  Investors  Guarantee  Corporation,  Ltd. 

On  the  1 5th  of  December,  1909,  in  Hillsboro,  New  Brunswick,  Mr.  Mc- 
Tavish married  Miss  Mabel  Evelyn  Sherwood,  a  daughter  of  Abraham  and 
Mary  Sherwood,  and  they  have  one  son,  Donald  Sherwood.  The  parents  are 
members  of  the  Presbyterian  church  and  Mr.  McTavish  belongs  to  the  Alpine 
Club.  Fraternally  he  is  identified  with  the  Masonic  lodge  in  Calgary,  Alberta, 
and  his  political  allegiance  is  given  to  the  liberal  party.  Although  one  of  the 
later  arrivals  in  Vancouver,  he  has  already  made  his  influence  felt  in  business 
circles  and  today  stands  high  among  the  men  of  marked  ability  and  substantial 
worth  in  the  community. 

JOHN   G.  WOODS. 

Throughout  a  period  of  residence  in  Vancouver  and  the  vicinity  dating  from 
1886  John  G.  Woods  has  firmly  entrenched  himself  in  the  regard  and  esteem  of 
his  fellow  citizens  and,  constantly  following  high  standards  of  business  and  per- 
sonal integrity,  has  reached  a  position  of  importance  in  business  circles.  He  is  at 
present  the  proprietor  of  the  large  wharfage  and  storage  business  operated  by 
J.  G.  Woods  &  Company  and  is  connected  with  many  other  representative 
concerns.  He  was  born  in  Chatham,  Ontario,  in  November,  1856,  and  is  a  son  of 
the  late  Robert  Stuart  and  Emma  Elizabeth  (Schwarz)  Woods.  The  paternal 
branch  of  the  family  has  been  in  Canada  for  many  generations,  the  grandfather, 
James  Woods,  having  been  a  prominent  lawyer  at  Sandwich,  Ontario.  He  married 
a  daughter  of  Commodore  Grant,  at  one  time  administrator  of  Upper  Canada  and 
a  man  of  much  prominence  in  Ontario.  Their  son,  Robert  Stuart  Woods,  father 
of  the  subject  of  this  review,  was  born  in  Sandwich,  and  after  he  reached  maturity 
followed  'in  his  father's  footsteps  and  practiced  law,  rising  to  be  judge  of  the 
county  court  of  Kent  and  becoming  also  queen's  counsel.  He  spent  his  entire  life 
in  Ontario  and  died  at  Chatham  when  he  was  eighty-seven  years  of  age.  Mrs. 
Woods,  mother  of  the  subject  of  this  review,  was  a  daughter  of  General  Schwarz, 
of  Michigan.  She  was  born  in  Philadelphia,  Pennsylvania,  and  went  to  Michigan 
in  pioneer  times,  driving  overland  in  a  carriage.  Her  father  came  west  as  a 
partner  of  John  Jacob  Astor  and  established  and  conducted  for  many  years  a 
fur-trading  business  at  Detroit.  She  has  also  passed  away,  her  death  having 
occurred  at  Chatham  when  she  was  eighty-seven  years  of  age. 

The  public  schools  of  his  native  city  afforded  John  G.  Woods  his  early 
educational  opportunities  and  he  was  afterward  a  student  in  the  Upper  Canada 
College.  In  1879  he  began  his  independent  career,  going  to  Colorado,  where  he 
engaged  in  prospecting  and  silver  mining  for  some  time,  later  returning  to 
Canada,  and  in  1882  locating  in  Winnipeg.  After  a  few  months  he  secured  a 
position  as  accountant  and  superintendent  of  the  old  Bell  farm  near  that  city,  but 
this  he  resigned  in  1884  in  order  to  work  on  the  construction  of  the  Canadian 
Pacific  Railroad  through  the  Canadian  Rockies.  After  one  year  at  this  work  he 
returned  to  Qu'Appelle  and  joined  Major  Bell,  then  chief  transport  officer,  as 
superintendent  of  transports  from  Fort  Qu'Appelle  to  the  Touchwood  hills,  later 
extending  his  territory  to  Fish  creek  and  other  points.  He  remained  until  the 
close  of  the  Riel  rebellion,  and  then  in  the  fall  of  1885  returned  to  the  mountains, 
making  a  journey  through  British  Columbia,  and  in  that  year  visiting  the  town  of 
Granville,  now  Vancouver.  In  the  following  year  he  returned  to  the  city  and 
started  work  for  Leamy  &  Kyle,  who  owned  the  second  mill  established  on  False 
creek,  and  rose  to  be  manager  of  this  concern,  afterward  becoming  superintendent 


364  BRITISH    COLUMBIA 

of  the  Moodyville  mills.  For  six  years  he  retained  that  connection,  but  at  the 
end  of  that  time  leased  a  large  tract  of  Canadian  Pacific  Railroad  land  near 
False  creek  and  established  himself  in  business  as  a  shingle  manufacturer,  forming 
a  partnership  with  a  Mr.  Spicer.  A  few  years  later  the  latter  disposed  of  his 
interests  in  the  concern  and  from  that  time  until  1912  Mr.  Woods  conducted  the 
business  alone.  He  closed  the  plant  in  1912,  and  since  that  time  has  been  sole 
proprietor  of  the  wharfage  and  storage  business  operated  under  the  name  of 
J.  G.  Woods  &  Company,  meeting  with  his  usual  well  deserved  success  in  the 
conduct  of  this  enterprise.  He  was  for  several  years  president  of  the  Export 
Lumber  &  Shingle  Company,  which  was  also  dissolved  in  1912,  and  he  was  for 
two  years  president  of  the  Employers  Association  of  Vancouver.  Since  the 
organization  of  the  Vancouver  Board  of  Trade,  in  the  '8os,  he  has  been  a  member 
of  this  body,  and  he  is  a  life  governor  of  the  Vancouver  General  Hospital,  on  the 
board  of  which  he  served  for  a  number  of  years.  These  connections  indicate 
something  of  the  scope  and  extent  of  his  interests  into  which  he  has  been 
carried  in  the  course  of  twenty-eight  years'  residence  in  this  city.  His  affairs  are 
conducted  in  an  able  and  straightforward  manner,  his  name  standing  as  a  synonym 
for  integrity,  probity  and  ability. 

In  June,  1902,  Mr.  Woods  was  united  in  marriage  to  Miss  Frances  Bennett 
McDougall,  a  daughter  of  the  late  Alexander  McDougall,  of  Vancouver,  and 
they  have  one  daughter,  Vivian  Amy.  Mrs.  Woods  is  well  known  in  social 
circles  of  this  city  and  belongs  to  the  Georgian  Club  and  the  Jericho  Country 
Club.  Mr.  Woods  has  also  important  club  affiliations,  holding  membership  in 
the  Vancouver  Club,  of  which  he  was  the  president  in  1908,  in  the  Union  Club 
of  Victoria,  the  United  Empire  Club  of  London  and  the  Jericho  Country  Gub. 
He  belongs  to  the  Masonic  lodge  and  is  president  of  the  British  Columbia  Thor- 
oughbred Association.  He  is  a  conservative  in  his  political  beliefs  and,  although 
not  active  as  an  office  seeker,  is  interested  in  the  welfare  of  the  city  where  he 
has  so  long  resided,  the  years  having  brought  to  him  a  creditable  position  as  a 
valued  citizen  and  business  man. 


RICHARD  CHARLES  HODGSON. 

The  success  which  has  come  to  Richard  Charles  Hodgson,  president  and 
manager  of  the  Hodgson  Plumbing  &  Heating  Company,  Limited,  of  Vancouver, 
is  the  direct  result  of  his  intelligently  directed  effort  and  thorough  understanding 
of  the  business  in  which  he  embarked  as  a  young  tradesman.  He  was  born 
February  22,  1875,  m  Chilliwack,  British  Columbia,  his  parents  being  Richard 
W.  and  Sarah  Elizabeth  Hodgson,  both  now  deceased,  having  passed  away  in 
Vancouver.  The  father  was  engaged  in  mining  in  the  Cariboo  country  in  the 
early  days,  thence  removed  to  Chilliwack  and  then  worked  for  seventeen  years 
for  the  Moodyville  Sawmill  Company  at  Moodyville  as  chief  engineer,  resign- 
ing in  1886.  Throughout  his  life  the  son  has  been  a  resident  of  British  Columbia, 
the  greater  part  of  his  youth,  as  well  as  his  manhood,  being  passed  in  Vancouver, 
where  he  was  a  pupil  in  the  public  and  high  schools. 

After  leaving  school  Mr.  Hodgson  learned  the  plumbing  business  and  was 
employed  for  a  time,  but  later  started  out  on  his  own  account  as  a  member 
of  the  firm  of  Knowdell  &  Hodgson.  This  partnership  was  continued  from 
1896  until  1903,  when  the  firm  dissolved  and  Mr.  Hodgson  was  joined  by 
another  partner,  forming  the  firm  of  Hodgson  &  Stearman,  under  which  name 
business  was  conducted  until  1910,  when  they  dissolved  partnership  and  Mr. 
Hodgson  then  incorporated  under  the  style  of  the  Hodgson  Plumbing  &  Heating 
Company,  Limited.  Mr.  Hodgson  was  elected  president  and  managing  director, 
and  in  that  connection  largely  controls  the  policy  of  the  business.  He  is  constantly 
seeking  out  new  methods  for  the  development  of  the  trade  and  from  the  begin- 
ning has  ever  recognized  the  fact  that  satisfied  patrons  are  the  best  advertise- 


RICHARD   C.   HODGSON 


BRITISH    COLUMBIA  367 

ment.  The  character  of  the  service  rendered  to  the  public,  based  upon  thorough 
knowledge  of  the  trade,  has  brought  him  success  and  he  is  now  at  the  head  of  a 
profitable  and  growing  business.  In  1913,  he  erected  the  present  structure  at 
No.  1174  Burrard  street  and  there  the  business  is  now  conducted  along  con- 
stantly expanding  lines. 

That  Mr.  Hodgson's  interests  are  broad  is  indicated  in  the  fact  that  he  is 
now  president  of  the  South  Vancouver  Board  of  Trade,  this  being  his  fourth 
successive  year  in  that  office;  is  a  director  of  the  British  Columbia  Agricultural 
&  Industrial  Society,  and  is  president  of  the  South  Vancouver  Conservative 
Association.  The  latter  affiliation  indicates  his  political  preference.  He  was 
also  chairman  of  the  South  Vancouver  school  board  from  1906  until  1908,  in- 
clusive. All  these  indicate  the  trend  of  his  activity  in  connection  with  public 
events  and  interests. 

Mr.  Hodgson  was  married  on  the  I4th  of  June,  1899,  'n  Vancouver,  to  Miss 
Minnie  Gale,  a  daughter  of  John  and  Eliza  Ann  Gale,  well  known  farming 
people  in  Ontario,  and  they  have  four  sons,  Percival,  James,  Walter  and  Ed- 
ward. The  religious  faith  of  the  family  is  that  of  the  Methodist  church  and  in 
addition  to  his  membership  therein  Mr.  Hodgson  is  a  past  master  of  Mount 
Hermon  Lodge,  A.  F.  &  A.  M.,  of  Vancouver,  and  a  member  of  the  Mystic 
Shrine.  He  likewise  belongs  to  the  Commercial,  Progress,  Vancouver  Automo- 
bile and  Canadian  Clubs.  He  is  a  forceful  and  active  member  of  the  Board  of 
Trade  and  it  was  through  the  efforts  of  Mr.  Hodgson  that  the  North  Arm  of  the 
Eraser  river  received  the  attention  of  that  body  during  his  incumbency  as  chair- 
man. The  agitation  for  the  improvement  of  this  important  part  of  the  river 
was  started  during  that  time.  It  is  sure  to  come  and  the  next  few  years  will 
undoubtedly  show  great  improvements  and  development  there.  An  appropriation 
of  two  hundred  thousand  dollars  by  the  Dominion  government  was  made  in  May, 
1913,  for  this  purpose.  His  appointment  to  the  North  Eraser  harbor  commis- 
sion has  been  most  popular  among  all  parties  and  sections.  Four  years  ago  he 
predicted  the  future  of  the  North  Arm  and  has  never  ceased  to  work  to  bring  the 
possibilities  of  the  fresh-water  channel  before  the  people.  Mr.  Hodgson  stands 
for  all  that  is  beneficial  in  citizenship  and  is  a  stalwart  champion  of  all  interests 
and  projects  which  are  a  matter  of  civic  virtue  and  civic  pride.  His  life  has 
been  actuated  by  high  and  honorable  principles  in  every  relation,  and  he  com- 
mands the  respect  and  confidence  of  those  with  whom  he  has  been  associated. 


R.   G.   CHAMBERLIN. 

Among  the  departments  of  municipal  government  which  are  of  utmost 
importance  to  the  well-being  of  a  city  is  none  that  is  of  more  vital  bearing  to 
every  citizen  than  the  department  of  police,  and  to  efficiently  handle  a  large  force 
in  a  city  as  tremendously  growing  as  Vancouver,  in  which  there  naturally  is  a 
floating  element  of  considerable  size,  demands  a  capable  and  experienced  head. 
R.  G.  Chamberlin,  who  for  five  years  and  seven  months,  from  1907  until  the  close 
of  1912,  had  been  the  chief  of  the  department  and  who  on  the  first  of  the  fol- 
lowing year  accepted  an  important  position  with  the  Canadian  Pacific  Railroad 
Company  in  Montreal,  placed  the  police  force  of  Vancouver  on  an  excellent 
footing  during  the  term  of  his  general  superintendency. 

Mr.  Chamberlin  is  a  native  of  Canada,  having  been  born  at  Chelsea,  in  the 
province  of  Quebec,  on  August  24,  1863.  He  there  spent  his  early  boyhood  and 
received  his  education  in  the  public  schools.  Police  work  seemed  to  have  a  natural 
attraction  for  him,  and  as  he  had  talents  in  that  direction  and  a  keen,  perceptive 
mind  he  joined,  in  1884,  the  Dominion  police  force  at  Ottawa,  and  in  the  course 
of  years  discharged  his  duties  with  such  excellence,  faithfulness,  courage  and 
circumspection  that  he  gradually  was  promoted,  until  in  1897  he  was  appointed 
inspector  of  the  Dominion  secret  service,  in  which  body  are  employed  only  the 


368  BRITISH    COLUMBIA 

most  able  of  men,  and  he  served  in  that  capacity  until  1907,  in  which  year  he 
became  chief  of  police  in  Vancouver.  When  he  entered  upon  his  duties  the 
force  was  well  adapted  to  the  needs  of  a  small  provincial  city,  but  as  the  coast 
town  grew  to  metropolitan  proportions  he  built  up  the  police  system,  instituting 
new  departments  and  enlarging  those  existing  and  doing  highly  superior  work 
while  in  office,  preserving  law  and  order  in  a  remarkable  manner.  It  may  be  said 
of  him  that  he  virtually  was  the  father  of  the  police  department  of  Vancouver  as 
it  exists  today.  The  lawless  elements  which  for  a  time  were  evident  in  various 
parts  of  the  city  disappeared  from  sight  as  if  by  magic  and  well  known  regulations 
were  instituted  by  him  to  insure  the  safety  of  citizens  which  was  placed  in  his 
trust.  Although  Chief  Chamberlin  was  stern  and  exacting  as  the  chief  officer  of  the 
force  and  expected  every  man  to  do  his  duty  as  well  and  conscientiously  as  he 
would  do  it  himself,  he  was  kindly  in  his  ways  and  lenient  to  the  first  offender 
whom  by  timely  advice  he  often  helped  to  turn  back  to  the  path  of  right  and 
mend  his  ways.  In  fact  the  invisible  part  of  his  work  in  that  respect  must  be  as 
highly  estimated  as  those  reforms  which  he  brought  about  that  were  open  to 
every  eye. 

Shortly  before  January  i,  1913,  Chief  Chamberlin  presented  his  resignation  to 
the  mayor,  not  on  account  of  the  slightest  difficulty  concerning  his  position  but 
simply  because  he  saw  it  his  duty  to  accept  a  position  which  offered  him  a  wider 
scope  for  his  abilities  and  a  larger  financial  return,  and  he  terminated  his  duties 
as  the  police  chief  shortly  before  the  end  of  the  year,  and  on  the  ist  of  January, 
1913,  accepted  a  most  responsible  position  in  the  service  of  the  Canadian  Pacific 
Railroad  under  Sir  Thomas  Shaughnessy  in  Montreal.  That  he  is  popular  and 
largely  appreciated  for  the  work  he  has  done  in  this  city  is  evidenced  by  the 
many  tokens  which  he  received  in  gratitude  for  his  services  and  the  many  good 
wishes  which  accompany  him  to  his  new  position.  The  resignation  of  Chief 
Chamberlin  was  largely  a  surprise  and  not  a  pleasant  surprise  to  the  citizens 
of  this  growing  community,  who  saw  in  him  represented  the  means  of  preserving 
law  and  order.  In  his  official  work  he  had  been  so  uniformly  successful  that 
there  never  occurred  to  anyone  a  thought  of  the  possibility  of  his  dropping  out  of 
the  department  or  leaving  the  city.  The  entire  department  under  his  regime  for 
five  and  a  half  years  has  been  highly  effective,  and  the  personal  loyalty  which 
he  inspired  by  his  spirit  in  his  men  was  most  satisfactory  to  the  citizens  of 
the  community.  In  dealing  with  the  general  public  the  chief  has  always  been 
singularly  happy  in  his  affairs,  and  the  high  regard  and  confidence  which  have 
been  placed  in  him  are  truly  warranted  and  highly  merited. 


HENRY  GREENSHIELDS  LOCKWOOD. 

The  bar  of  British  Columbia  numbers  among  its  younger  and,  by  consensus 
of  public  opinion,  its  most  able  representatives  Henry  Greenshields  Lockwood, 
practicing  in  Vancouver  as  a  member  of  the  firm  of  Taschereau  &  Lockwood, 
barristers  and  solicitors.  He  was  born  in  Sorel,  Quebec,  January  22,  1888, 
and  is  a  son  of  Herbert  and  Marietta  Lockwood,  who  for  many  years  were 
the  only  English-speaking  people  in  that  community.  His  family  contains  many 
prominent  representatives,  Mr.  Lockwood  being  related  to  the  late  Sir  Frank 
Lockwood,  of  London,  England,  a  prominent  barrister  of  the  last  century  and 
a  well  known  and  widely  read  author. 

Mr.  Lockwood  had  a  splendid  educational  preparation  for  his  life  work,  for 
after  leaving  Queen's  school  in  Vancouver  he  entered  the  Collegiate  Institute 
at  Victoria  and  was  afterward  a  student  in  Trinity  College,  Port  Hope,  Ontario. 
He  spent  one  year  in  the  Royal  Military  College  of  Kingston,  in  the  same  prov- 
ince, attending,  however,  only  one  year,  after  which  he  received  his  honorable 
discharge.  Having  determined  to  study  law,  he  was  articled  to  L.  G.  McPhillips, 
K.  C.,  one  of  the  leading  barristers  in  Vancouver,  and  was  also  for  a  short  time 


HENRY   G.   LOCKWOOD 


BRITISH    COLUMBIA  371 

with  Mr.  Taschereau  in  the  same  city.  He  was  called  to  the  bar  of  British 
Columbia  in  1912  and  started  immediately  in  practice  with  his  former  preceptor, 
the  firm  of  Taschereau  &  Lockwood  being  formed.  This  connection  has  since 
been  maintained  and  the  firm  is  one  of  the  most  reliable  in  the  city.  Mr. 
Lockwood  has  proven  himself  an  able  barrister,  well  versed  in  the  underlying 
principles  of  his  profession  and  possessed  of  the  keen  mind  and  the  forceful 
personality  necessary  to  make  knowledge  effective  in  any  field.  As  a  consequence 
his  practice  has  grown  rapidly  and  although  he  has  been  only  one  year  at  the 
bar  he  today  occupies  a  position  of  weight  in  legal  circles. 

Mr.  Lockwood  is  a  member  of  the  Anglican  church  and  is  a  conservative 
in  his  political  beliefs,  his  influence  being  always  on  the  side  of  right,  reform 
and  advancement.  At  the  age  of  twenty-five  he  has  already  won  a  credit- 
able place  at  the  bar,  and,  being  ambitious,  able  and  energetic,  will  undoubtedly 
continue  to  make  rapid  and  steady  progress  in  his  chosen  field. 


GERALD  UPTON. 

Gerald  Upton  is  secretary  of  the  school  board  of  Vancouver,  in  which  con- 
nection he  is  putting  forth  earnest  effort  to  advance  the  educational  facilities 
which  the  city  offers  to  the  young.  He  was  born  in  London,  England,  in  June, 
1879,  a  son  °f  Edward  and  Elizabeth  (Fox)  Upton,  both  natives  of  Kent  county, 
England,  where  they  still  reside. 

Gerald  Upton  was  educated  for  the  bar,  being  articled  for  three  years,  but  he 
did  not  feel  that  the  profession  was  that  to  which  he  wished  to  devote  his  life 
work,  and  in  1898,  when  a  youth  of  nineteen  years,  he  crossed  the  Atlantic  to  the 
Dominion,  spending  two  years  in  upper  Canada.  He  afterward  traveled  exten- 
sively, visiting  California,  Japan  and  China,  and  spending  two  summers  in  Alaska. 
He  then  joined  the  mounted  police  and  went  to  Africa,  where  he  served  for  two 
years  in  the  Boer  war.  He  returned  to  Canada  in  1903,  and  for  six  years  was 
in  the  employ  of  John  Helliwell.  He  next  returned  to  England  for  a  short  time, 
but  again  came  to  this  country  in  1911,  and  took  up  the  auditing  and  accounting 
business.  In  1912  he  was  engaged  to  investigate  the  affairs  of  the  board  of 
school  trustees  and  later  in  the  same  year  was  tendered  the  position  of  secretary 
of  the  board,  in.  which  capacity  he  is  now  ably  serving,  seeking  through  the 
exercise  of  his  official  duties  to  further  the  interests  of  the  schools  of  the  city. 
In  politics  he  is  a  conservative,  but  has  never  been  active  as  a  party  worker. 

In  April,  1907,  Mr.  Upton  was  married  in  Vancouver  to  Miss  E.  J.  Holmes, 
who  was  born  in  Hong  Kong,  China,  of  English  parentage.  The  three  children 
of  this  marriage  are  Herbert,  Jack  and  Edward.  Mr.  Upton's  extensive  travel 
and  wide  experience  have  made  him  an  interesting  companion,  and  a  genial 
nature  contributes  to  make  his  a  pleasing  personality. 


THEODORE   HATTON   CALLAND. 

Theodore  Hatton  Calland,  sole  proprietor  of  the  important  real-estate  concern 
conducted  under  the  name  of  T.  H.  Calland  &  Company,  and  for  twenty-four 
years  past  one  of  the  able  and  substantial  business  men  of  Vancouver,  was  born 
in  Neath,  south  Wales,  May  25,  1863,  his  parents  being  John  Forbes  and  Harriet 
i..  Calland.  In  the  acquirement  of  an  education  he  attended  Cheltenham  College 
in  England  and  after  laying  aside  his  books  came  to  the  United  States,  becoming 
connected  with  the  Bank  of  North  America  in  New  York.  He  held  his  position 
with  this  concern  for  a  number  of  years,  being  transferred  from  New  York  to 
Vancouver,  British  Columbia,  in  1888.  In  the  following  year  he  resigned  this 
position  and  established  himself  in  the  real-estate  business,  with  which  he  has 
vol.  in— 13 


372  BRITISH    COLUMBIA 

been  continuously  identified  since  that  time.  His  business  is  operated  under  the 
name  of  T.  H.  Calland  &  Company,  but  he  is  the  sole  proprietor,  and  to  his 
initiative  spirit,  his  enterprise  and  keen  business  discrimination  the  concern  owes 
all  of  its  growth  and  development. 

On  the  ist  of  June,  1898,  in  Vancouver,  Mr.  Calland  was  united  in  marriage 
to  Miss  Kathleen  Hebden,  and  they  have  four  children,  Vera,  Phyllis,  Barbara 
and  John  Christopher.  The  parents  are  well  known  in  social  circles  of  Van- 
couver and  Mr.  Calland  belongs  to  the  Vancouver  and  Western  Clubs.  He  gives 
his  political  allegiance  to  the  conservative  party  and  is  interested  in  public  affairs, 
having  served  from  1907  to  1908  as  a  member  of  the  board  of  aldermen.  He  is, 
however,  not  in  any  sense  an  office  seeker,  preferring  to  concentrate  his  energies 
upon  his  business  affairs,  which,  capably  conducted,  are  bringing  him  richly 
merited  success.  During  the  twenty-five  years  of  his  residence  in  Vancouver  his 
sterling '  worth  has  come  to  be  widely  acknowledged,  his  business  enterprise 
having  gained  him  distinction  in  commercial  circles  and  his  business  probity 
standing  as  an  unquestioned  fact  in  his  career. 


CAPTAIN  E.  J.  FADER. 

The  term  "captain  of  industry"  finds  its  justification  in  the  life  record  of 
Captain  E.  J.  Fader,  of  New  Westminster,  British  Columbia,  a  man  who  by 
the  sheer  force  of  his  will,  his  ability,  his  foresight  and  his  initiative  built  up 
mammoth  enterprises  which  have  been  stones  in  the  foundation  upon  which 
rests  the  industrial  development  of  the  province.  That  his  qualities  are  of  a 
character  far  beyond  those  possessed  by  the  majority  no  one  doubts,  and  yet 
in  manner  Captain  Fader  never  indicates  that  he  recognizes  or  knows  aught 
of  his  own  superiority.  Everlastingly  he  pushed  on,  never  losing  sight  of  his 
purpose,  never  forgetting  for  a  moment  the  goal  before  him,  ever  conscious 
that  his  aim  was  justifiable  and  his  course  honorable.  The  thing  supremely 
worth  having  in  all  this  world  is  opportunity,  coupled  with  the  capacity  to  do 
well  and  worthily  a  piece  of  work,  the  doing  of  which  shall  be  of  vital  sig- 
nificance. Opportunity  and  the  capacity  were  given  to  Captain  Fader  and  he 
has  used  both  wisely  and  well.  As  manager  of  the  British  Columbia  Trans- 
portation Company,  an  organization  which  controls  property  in  excess  of  a 
million  dollars,  he  holds  a  foremost  position  in  business  life  in  western  Canada, 
but  this  connection  does  not  exhaust  by  any  means  his  activities.  Coming  to 
New  Westminster  in  1902,  he  saw  a  great  opportunity  in  the  timber  business 
and  at  one  time  owned  more  timber  land — an  area  exceeding  six  hundred  square 
miles — than  any  other  man  in  Canada  and  in  order  to  bring  about  the  develop- 
ment of  this  vast  tract  and  facilitate  its  exploitation  formed  great  companies 
which  became  cornerstones  in  the  timber  industry.  As  a  pioneer  he  accom- 
panied surveying  expeditions  at  the  time  of  early  railroad  construction,  in  the 
'8os.  He  was  a  master  of  steamboats,  being  at  that  time  instrumental  in  sav- 
ing (the  passengers  and  crew  of  a  sinking  vessel.  Moreover,  he  is  active  in 
timber  cruising  and  mining,  being  successful  along  these  various  lines.  He 
built  the  first  modern  hotel  in  New  Westminster  and  in  other  ways  contributed 
to  the  growth  of  the  city.  A  versatile  man  of  no  mean  talents,  he  improved 
his  outlook  upon  the  world  by  extensive  travel  in  Europe  and  the  Hawaiian 
Islands  and  has  become  known,  as  the  years  have  passed,  as  one  of  the  fore- 
most judges  of  commercial  conditions  in  the  Canadian  northwest. 

Captain  Fader  was  born  in  Halifax,  Nova  Scotia,  on  December  12,  1863, 
a  son  of  John  Henry  and  Mary  Ann  (Mason)  Fader,  natives  of  Halifax. 
When  a  boy  of  fourteen  E.  J.  Fader  proceeded  westward  to  Port  Arthur  and 
during  the  early  construction  of  the  railroad  between  the  Great  Lakes  and 
Manitoba,  which  now  forms  a  part  of  the  Canadian  Pacific  system,  carried 
his  blankets  over  the  old  Dawson  road  to  Fort  Steele.  The  road  was  then 


CAPTAIN  E.  J.  FADER 


BRITISH    COLUMBIA  375 

under  construction,  Percell  &  Ryan  having  charge  of  the  work.  During  the 
years  1878  and  1879  tne  road  was  completed  to  Winnipeg,  it  being  taken  over 
in  the  latter  year  by  the  Canadian  Pacific.  In  1880  Captain  Fader  joined  one 
of  the  first  surveying  expeditions  into  the  north  Saskatchewan  territory,  their 
party  laying  out  all  the  base  lines  in  North  Saskatchewan  between  Prince  Albert 
and  Carleton  lake.  From  there  during  the  year  1882  to  the  spring  of  1883 
he  made  his  way  down  to  the  north  shore,  where  he  was  at  the  time  when  the 
troops  of  the  Kiel  rebellion  passed  through  there.  In  1884  he  retraced  his 
way  to  the  summit  of  the  Selkirks  and  in  1885,  when  the  Canadian  Pacific 
line  was  built,  was  still  there,  having  at  that  time  the  pleasure  of  welcoming 
Lady  Macdonald,  wife  of  the  then  premier,  and  presented  her  with  a  bouquet 
of  wild  flowers  which  he  had  picked  himself.  He  knew  of  the  coming  of  Sir 
John  and  Lady  Macdonald  and  the  idea  of  a  floral  gift  from  the  mountain  lands 
appealed  to  him  as  strongly  appropriate  and,  needless  to  say,  was  accepted  by 
Lady  Macdonald  in  the  same  spirit.  During  the  years  1886  and  1887  he  remained 
in  the  mountains  but  in  1888  went  to  Vancouver,  where  he  engaged  in  steam- 
boating.  During  his  first  year,  when  Captain  Fader  was  running  the  steamer 
Muriel,  the  Beaver  was  lost  outside  the  Vancouver  Narrows  on  August  13, 
1888,  and  upon  his  return  from  Chemainus  about  twelve  o'clock  midnight,  he 
discovered  the  Beaver  in  distress  on  the  rocks  and  went  to  her  assistance. 
He  worked  to  save  her  until  four  o'clock  in  the  morning  but  after  breaking 
his  towline  several  times  gave  up,  as  the  tide  was  falling  fast  and  she  was 
expected  every  moment  to  sink.  In  the  meantime,  however,  he  had  lowered 
his  boats  and  taken  off  all  of  her  passengers  and  crew.  From  his  recollection 
there  were  about  forty  passengers  rescued,  all  of  whom  were  taken  aboard  his 
vessel  with  the  exception  of  the  captain,  who  remained  until  the  Beaver  went 
down,  but  he  also  was  later  picked  up.  The  Beaver  was  the  first  boat  that  ever 
turned  a  wheel  on  the  Pacific  ocean.  From  1888  to  1892  Captain  Fader  con- 
tinued as  master  but  subsequently  engaged  in  exploring  the  country  and  timber 
cruising,  making  himself  during  that  time  master  of  the  Chinook  dialect  which 
he  was  able  to  talk  fluently  with  all  of  the  Indian  tribes.  After  this  period  he 
for  ten  years  engaged  in  mining  and  various  other  enterprises,  spending  two 
years  thereof  in  Europe  and  six  months  in  the  Hawaiian  Islands. 

In  1902  Captain  Fader  came  to  New  Westminster  and,  perceiving  the  great 
future  in  store  for  the  little  city  which  had  then  about  five  thousand  inhabi- 
tants, he  decided  to  make  it  his  headquarters.  During  his  trip  abroad  he  was 
married  on  September  21,  1899,  to  Miss  Lucy  Ashby,  of  London,  England,  and 
on  his  return  selected  New  Westminster  as  his  home  and  has  ever  since  resided 
here.  Engaging  in  the  timber  business,  he  at  one  time  owned  more  land  of 
that  description  than  any  other  man  in  Canada,  holding  title  to  more  than  six 
hundred  square  miles  of  timber  and  is  still  controlling  large  tracts.  Finding, 
however,  at  the  time  that  he  could  not  handle  so  enormous  a  proposition  in- 
dividually, he  organized  many  large  companies  who  took  over  part  of  his  hold- 
ings and  in  that  way  contributed  largely  to  the  growth  of  the  timber  business 
in  the  province.  He  was  instrumental  in  founding  the  Small  &  Bucklin  Lum- 
ber Company,  who  control  more  than  one  billion  feet;  the  American  Timber 
Holding  Company,  who  control  nearly  three  billion  feet;  the  Nimpkish  Log- 
ging Company,  who  own  their  own  railway  and  control  upward  of  one  billion 
feet;  and  the  Quesnelle  Lake  Lumber  Holding  Company,  who  control  about 
six  hundred  million  feet.  Captain  Fader  also  promoted  the  Fraser  River  Tan- 
nery located  across  the  Fraser  river  from  New  Westminster.  He  is  still  a 
stockholder  in  all  of  these  companies  with  the  exception  of  the  one  first  men- 
tioned. He  gave  a  great  impetus  to  the  expansion  of  the  city  by  building  with 
his  own  capital  the  Russell  Hotel  in  New  Westminster,  the  only  first  class  house 
in  the  city,  disposing  of  the  same,  however,  in  1910.  Subsequently  he  made  a 
trip  to  England,  there  spending  eighteen  months,  during  which  stay  he  organ- 
ized a  number  of  companies.  The  Vancouver  Island  Timber  Syndicate  is  one 
of  these  important  ventures.  He  also  promoted  the  Cambricol  Company,  Limited, 


376  BRITISH    COLUMBIA 

a  land-holding  company,  and  the  British  Columbia  Transport  Company,  of  the 
latter  of  which  Captain  Fader  is  still  the  manager.  This  company  has  extensive 
interests  in  New  Westminster  and  vicinity,  controlling  about  one  million  dol- 
lars worth  of  property.  They  own  the  largest  docks  along  the  water  front  of 
the  city,  including  a  general  building  supply  plant  and  a  rock  and  gravel  plant 
having  a  capacity  of  one  thousand  yards  of  crushed  rock  and  gravel  per  day. 
They  also  own  one  hundred  and  fifty  thousand  dollars  worth  of  tugs,  barges 
and  floating  properties.  The  beneficial  effect  which  the  commercial  activities 
of  Captain  Fader  have  had  upon  the  commercial  development  of  New  West- 
minster and  British  Columbia  can  hardly  be  estimated  but  it  is  recognized  on 
all  sides  that  he  is  one  of  the  most  enterprising  and  foremost  men  in  the  city, 
who  has  not  only  promoted  enterprises  in  his  own  interest  but  gives  as  much 
consideration  to  the  effect  his  activities  have  upon  the  general  welfare. 

Captain  and  Mrs.  Fader  are  the  parents  of  one  daughter,  Eva  Joan.  They 
are  members  of  the  Church  of  England,  taking  an  earnest  interest  in  the  work 
of  the  church  and  its  allied  societies.  Fraternally  Captain  Fader  is  known  as 
a  member  of  the  blue  lodge  of  Masons  and  of  the  local  lodges  of  the  Benevo- 
lent Protective  Order  of  Elks  and  the  Loyal  Order  of  Moose.  His  public 
spirit  has  found  expression  in  the  efficient'  service  which  he  rendered  his  city 
by  becoming  a  member  of  one  of  its  boards  of  aldermen  in  1908-1909.  Captain 
Fader  is  an  optimist,  yet  a  man  shrewd  and  gifted  with  an  extraordinarily  sound 
judgment.  He  has  an  infinite  faith  in  the  future  of  his  adopted  city  and  per- 
sonally has  done  much  to  make  that  future  a  reality.  Wherever  movements  are 
underway  for  the  promotion  of  projects  along  material  or  intellectual  lines  he  can 
be  found  in  the  front  ranks  of  those  who  are  willing  to  give  their  share  of 
time  and  money  to  such  projects.  New  Westminster  is  proud  to  call  him  one 
of  her  citizens  and  is  grateful  for  what  he  has  been  able  to  accomplish  in  her 
behalf. 


CHARLES  RANSOME  GILBERT. 

Charles  Ransome  Gilbert  is  manager  of  the   insurance  department   of  the 

London  &  British  North  America  Company,  Ltd.,  and  there  is  no  phase  of  the 

insurance  business   with  which   he   is   not   familiar     He   was  born   in   Chicago, 

August  8,  1863,  his  parents  being  Charles  and  Jane  Gilbert.    The  father  was  one 

of  the  early  merchants  of  that  city  and  for  thirty  years  was  a  well  known 

member  of  the  Chicago  Board  of  Trade.    The  public  schools  of  Chicago  furnished 

Charles  Ransome  Gilbert  his  educational  opportunities,  and  in  early  manhood  he 

left  home  to  find  what  he  believed  to  be  broader  and  better  advantages  in  the 

west.    For  three  years  he  followed  various  pursuits,  and  then,  in  1883,  returned 

to  Chicago,  where  he  entered  the  employ  of  a  lumber  company.     In  the  fall  of 

1887  he  went  to  California,  where  he  engaged  in  ranching  for  two  years,  and 

then  turned  his  attention  to  the  insurance  business,  with  which  he  has  since  been 

connected  in  various  capacities.    In  1900  he  came  to  Vancouver  as  secretary  of  the 

Board  of  Underwriters,  and  at  that  time  reorganized  the  board.    Gradually  he  has 

worked  his  way  upward  in  the  insurance  field  as  he  has  mastered  the  business 

in  principle  and  detail,  and  in   1908  he  was  appointed  to  his  present  position 

as  manager  of  the  insurance  department  of  the  London  &  British,  North  America 

Company,  Ltd.,  which  position  he  has  held  continuously  since.    Aside  from  this 

he  has  made  considerable  investments  in  real  estate.     Moreover,  he  was  one  of 

the  first  directors  of  the  Horse  Show  Association  of  Vancouver  and  has  remained 

director  and  treasurer  of  the  organization  since  its  inception. 

On  the  ist  of  February,  1896,  Mr.  Gilbert  was  united  in  marriage  to  Miss 
Elizabeth  Porter,  a  daughter  of  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Norman  Porter,  New  England 
people  who  came  to  the  coast  at  an  early  day.  The  only  child  of  this  marriage 
is  John  Porter  Gilbert.  Mr.  Gilbert  belongs  to  the  Presbyterian  church  and  is 


BRITISH    COLUMBIA  377 

well  known  in  club  circles  through  his  membership  in  the  Terminal  City,  Jericho 
Country  and  Royal  Vancouver  Yacht  Clubs.  His  friends — and  they  are  many — 
find  him  a  genial,  courteous  gentleman  and  one  to  whom  opportunity  means 
success  whether  for  the  benefit  of  himself  or  of  some  public  measure. 


JOHN   FORBES   MAGUIRE. 

A  mind  at  once  original,  daring  and  conservative ;  a  business  ability  which  has 
been  developed  by  many  years  of  active  and  prominent  connection  with  important 
financial  and  business  interests;  an  initiative  spirit,  an  administrative  power  and 
a  public  spirit  embracing  interest  in  numerous  and  radically  different  phases  of 
municipal  development — these  have  brought  John  Forbes  Maguire  to  a  place  of 
distinction  in  Vancouver,  where  since  1905  he  has  made  his  home,  and  where  he 
has  thoroughly  identified  himself  with  the  cause  of  community  advancement  and 
development.  The  city  owes  to  him  in  large  measure  the  foundation  of  its  Stock 
Exchange,  the  organization  of  the  great  Canadian  Club  and,  along  business  lines, 
the  development  of  one  of  the  most  important  manufacturers'  agencies  in  the 
province,  besides  the  great  debt  incurred  through  his  many  substantial  contribu- 
tions to  general  business  progress  and  the  effect  which  his  individual  success  has 
had  upon  commercial  and  financial  standards. 

Mr.  Maguire  was  born  in  Dublin,  Ireland,  on  the  2Qth  of  July,  1856,  and  is 
a  son  of  the  Reverend  Thomas  and  Anne  Maguire,  and  a  representative  of  one 
of  the  oldest  families  in  the  Emerald  isle,  the  clan  of  Maguire  having  been  prom- 
inent in  County  Fermanagh  since  the  thirteenth  century.  The  public  schools  of 
his  native  city  afforded  him  his  educational  opportunities,  and  after  he  laid  aside 
his  books  at  the  age  of  eighteen  he  became  connected  with  the  Cork  branch  of 
the  Bank  of  Ireland,  serving  in  various  capacities  and  winning  rapid  advancement, 
finally  becoming  one  of  the  most  trusted  representatives  of  the  institution  and  a 
far-sighted  and  discriminating  financier.  From  1892  to  1899  he  operated  on  the 
stock  exchange,  becoming  a  member  of  the  exchanges  in  Dublin  and  Cork,  and  he 
became  known  as  an  able  and  successful  manipulator,  accumulating  a  large  for- 
tune, which,  however,  was  wiped  out  at  the  time  of  the  Boer  war,  when  he  met 
with  heavy  financial  reverses.  Mr.  Maguire  remained  in  Ireland  until  1905,  but 
in  that  year  came  to  Canada,  settling  in  Vancouver,  British  Columbia,  where  he 
established  himself  in  business  as  a  manufacturer's  agent,  representing  English 
manufacturers  exclusively.  This  line  of  business  has  since  claimed  his  attention, 
and  his  prosperity  and  prominence  have  increased  steadily,  his  interest  being  now 
of  an  extensive  and  important  character.  In  1910  the  Anglo-British  Columbia 
Agency,  Ltd.,  was  incorporated  in  London,  the  headquarters  of  the  concern,  and 
in  the  same  year  was  licensed  in  British  Columbia,  Mr.  Maguire  being  appointed 
managing  director  of  the  provincial  offices.  This  position  he  has  held  since 
that  time  and  the  connection  has  proved  an  excellent  one  for  himself  and  for  the 
corporation  which  he  represents.  He  has  used  his  fine  executive  and  organizing 
ability,  his  discrimination,  foresight  and  sound  judgment  as  the  basis  of  work 
which  has  been  vital  and  far-reaching  in  its  effects  and  which  has  influenced  in  an 
important  way  the  industrial,  commercial  and  financial  growth  of  the  city. 
During  the  period  of  his  residence  here,  Mr.  Maguire  has  not  limited  his  activi- 
ties to  one  field,  but  has  been  a  leader  of  development  along  many  lines,  having 
been  among  the  first  founders  of  the  Vancouver  Stock  Exchange  and  among  the 
organizers  of  the  Canadian  Club  at  Vancouver.  His  interests  have  all  been  of  a 
constructive  character  and  his  work  beneficial  in  its  purposes,  his  well  directed 
activities  having  brought  him  today  to  a  high  position  among  the  men  of  marked 
ability  and  substantial  worth  in  the  community. 

On  the  1 2th  of  June,  1879,  in  Cork,  Ireland,  Mr.  Maguire  married  Miss 
Anna  McNamara,  a  daughter  of  Richard  and  Elizabeth  McNamara,  and  they 
have  two  children,  Eileen  and  Gordon.  Eileen  Maguire  is  recognized  as  the  lead- 


378  BRITISH    COLUMBIA 

ing  contralto  in  Vancouver  and  is  in  great  demand  as  a  professional  singer,  com- 
manding the  highest  prices.  Her  brother  Gordon  is  an  automobile  expert  and 
well  known  in  this  capacity  in  the  city.  Both  have  before  them  promising  careers 
and  have  already  upheld  the  reputation  of  the  family  for  superior  work  along 
lines  which  claim  their  interest.  Another  well  known  representative  of  the 
Maguire  family  is  John  F.  Maguire's  brother,  Dr.  Miller  Maguire,  who  is  a  fel- 
low of  the  Royal  Historical  Society  and  a  member  of  the  bars  of  England  and 
Ireland.  He  is  also  a  member  of  the  Inns  of  Temple  London  Volunteers  and  has 
received  the  Order  of  the  Rising  Sun,  conferred  upon  him  by  the  emperor  of 
Japan  in  recognition  of  the  services  which  he  rendered  that  country  through  his 
book  on  the  Russo-Japanese  war. 

Fraternally  John  Forbes  Maguire  is  connected  with  the  Masonic  order,  hold- 
ing membership  in  an  English  lodge,  and  he  still  retains  his  interest  in  football, 
to  which  he  gave  a  great  deal  of  time  in  early  life.  He  is  an  old  international 
rugby  player,  having  "got  his  cap"  for  Ireland  in  1884,  and  before  leaving  his 
native  country  was  president  of  the  Irish  Rugby  Union.  He  is  an  excellent 
type  of  the  present-day  business  man,  modern  in  his  views,  progressive  in  his  ideas 
and  possessed  of  that  public  spirit  which  makes  his  individual  success  a  factor 
in  community  development.  He  is  well  and  favorably  known  in  Vancouver,  and 
is  undoubtedly  one  of  the  most  eminent  and  successful  men  of  the  city,  his  name 
being  held  in  high  regard  and  honor  wherever  it  is  known. 


HOWARD  PAGE  CARPER. 

A  man  whose  executive  ability,  progressive  spirit  and  power  of  organization 
and  control  have  been  important  elements  in  his  rapid  rise  to  prosperity  and 
prominence  in  business  circles  of  Vancouver  is  Howard  Page  Carper,  president 
of  Thompson  &  Carper,  Limited,  and  connected  with  other  important  corporate 
interests  in  different  parts  of  Canada.  He  was  born  in  Winnipeg,  Manitoba, 
April  24,  1879,  and  is  a  son  of  Page  and  Emma  Carper,  the  former  a  pioneer 
railroad  man  in  that  province. 

The  public  schools  of  Winnipeg  afforded  Howard  P.  Carper  his  early  educa- 
tional opportunities  and  he  afterward  entered  Manitoba  University,  from  which 
he  was  graduated  with  the  degree  of  B.  A.  in  1900  and  later  with  the  degree 
of  LL.  B.  Afterward  he  read  law  with  Aikins,  Culver  &  Pitblado  in  Winnipeg 
and  was  called  to  the  Manitoba  bar  in  1903.  He  was  alone  in  the  practice  in  his 
native  city  for  six  years,  after  which  he  became  a  partner  in  the  firm  of  Potts, 
Carper  &  Thompson,  barristers.  This  became  a  strong  and  reliable  law  firm  and 
was  connected  with  a  great  deal  of  important  litigation,  their  clientage  being 
representative  and  extensive.  The  partnership  existed  until  the  death  of  Mr. 
Potts  in  1911,  when  it  was  dissolved,  the  firm  of  Thompson  &  Carper,  Limited, 
being  afterward  formed  with  headquarters  at  Vancouver.  They  established 
themselves  in  this  city  as  investment  brokers  and  dealers  in  farm,  timber  and 
coal  lands  and  Mr.  Carper  was  made  president,  a  position  which  he  still  holds. 
The  company  controls  a  large  investment  brokerage  business  and  its  interests 
along  all  lines  are  extensive,  it  being  one  of  the  largest  and  most  important  of 
its  kind  in  the  city.  As  its  head  Mr.  Carper  has  constant  demands  upon  his  tact, 
his  executive  ability  and  general  efficiency — demands  which  are  always  met  fully 
and  completely,  the  success  of  the  institution  being  in  a  large  measure  due  to  him. 
His  ability  and  force  have  naturally  carried  him  forward  into  other  important 
business  relations  and  he  is  now  president  of  the  Manitoba  Timber  Company, 
Limited,  of  Winnipeg,  and  a  director  in  the  Canadian  Western  Electric  Company, 
connections  which  indicate  something  of  the  importance  of  his  business  standing 
and  the  scope  and  variety  of  his  interests. 

At  Portage  la  Prairie,  Manitoba,  on  the  loth  of  September,  1906,  Mr.  Carper 
was  united  in  marriage  to  Miss  Leila  Mawhinney,  a  daughter  of  William  and 


HOWARD  P.  CARPER 


BRITISH    COLUMBIA  381 

Isabel  Mawhinney,  pioneers  in  that  part  of  the  province.    Mr.  and  Mrs.  Carper 
have  two  children,  Gordon  Howard  and  Margery  Isabel. 

Mr.  Carper  is  a  member  of  the  Assiniboine  Club  of  Winnipeg  and  the 
Carleton  Club  of  the  same  city.  He  is  a  liberal  in  his  political  views  and  fra- 
ternally is  identified  with  the  Independent  Order  of  Odd  Fellows  and  the  Knights 
of  Pythias.  A  man  of  more  than  ordinary  ability  and  energy,  he  has  attained 
the  enviable  place  which  he  now  occupies  in  business  and  social  circles  of  Van- 
couver by  his  own  resourcefulness,  progressive  spirit  and  firm  determination — 
qualities  in  his  character  which  form  the  basis  of  his  success.  He  is  a  member 
of  the  Methodist  church  and  is  a  man  who  commands  and  holds  the  confidence 
and  high  regard  of  all  who  are  in  any  way  associated  with  him. 


THEODORE  MACFARLANE  KNAPPEN. 

Theodore  Macfarlane  Knappen,  late  manager  and  secretary  of  the  Coquitlam 
Terminal  Company,  possesses  a  spirit  of  enterprise  that  recognizes  opportunity 
and  utilizes  it  to  its  full  extent.  His  efforts  and  activities  in  the  field  of  real 
estate  have  led  to  the  settlement  and  susbtantial  improvement  of  various  sections 
of  western  Canada,  which,  indeed,  owes  much  to  his  efforts  in  inducing  immigra- 
tion to  this  part  of  the  country.  Mr.  Knappen  realized  how  valuable  conditions 
here  could  become  and  set  to  work  to  induce  his  fellow  countrymen  to  improve 
the  opportunity  of  becoming  residents  of  western  Canada.  He  was  born  in 
Poynette,  Wisconsin,  October  23,  1871,  a  son  of  Theodore  and  Sarah  Knappen. 
Following  the  removal  of  the  family  to  Minnesota  he  pursued  his  education  in  the 
public  schools  of  that  state  and  in  the  University  of  Minnesota,  from  which  he 
was  graduated  with  the  class  of  1891,  winning  the  Bachelor  of  Arts  degree. 
After  about  two  years  as  civil  engineer  in  Washington  and  Montana  he  turned 
his  attention  to  the  newspaper  business  in  Minneapolis,  spending  about  fifteen 
years  in  that  city  and  St.  Paul,  during  which  time  he  was  connected  with  every 
department  of  newspaper  publication.  This  proved  an  excellent  training  school 
for  his  later  work  when  he  came  to  exploit  the  advantages  and  opportunities  of 
the  west.  His  initial  step  in  this  direction  was  made  when  he  accepted  the  office 
of  secretary  and  general  manager  of  the  Western  Canadian  Immigration  Associ- 
ation. In  fact,  he  practically  organized  this  body  after  he  entered  its  employ 
and  mapped  out  its  work,  the  purposes  of  the  association  being  to  educate  the 
people  of  the  United  States  concerning  the  advantages  of  settling  in  Canada 
He  made  his  headquarters  largely  in  Winnipeg,  and  here  his  newspaper  experi- 
ence served  him  in  good  stead,  for  he  was  active  in  the  promotion  of  publicity  in 
American  periodicals,  exploiting  the  interests  and  opportunities  of  the  country. 
It  was  a  logical  step  from  that  business  into  the  land  business  and  incidentally  he 
acquired  large  holdings  in  British  Columbia,  as  he  saw  opportunity  for  judicious 
investments.  When  the  Coquitlam  Terminal  Company  was  organized  in  1911 
he  was  called  upon  to  take  up  the  management  of  the  business,  and  was  also 
elected  secretary  of  the  company.  He  was  for  two  years  most  active  in  control 
of  its  affairs,  thoroughly  understands  every  phase  of  the  real-estate  business,  and 
in  exploiting  its  interests  contributed  to  public  progress  as  well  as  to  individual 
prosperity.  He  is  a  director  in  a  number  of  local  business  corporations  and 
companies  in  western  Canada  besides  others  in  the  United  States. 

On  the  ist  of  July,  1896,  in  Minneapolis,  Minnesota,  Mr.  Knappen  was  united 
in  marriage  to  Miss  Nellie  Cross,  a  daughter  of  Judson  N.  and  Clara  (Norton) 
Cross,  representatives  of  old  New  England  families.  The  father  was  a  veteran  of 
the  Civil  war,  in  which  he  served  with  the  rank  of  captain.  Mr.  and  Mrs. 
Knappen  are  the  parents  of  three  children,  Judson,  Theodore,  Jr.,  and  Phoebe. 
The  parents  are  members  of  St.  George's  Anglican  church.  He  has  various  fra- 
ternal and  club  relations,  belonging  to  the  Psi  Upsilon  of  the  University  of  Minne- 
sota and  the  famous  American  honorary  society,  the  Phi  Beta  Kappa,  of  the 


382  BRITISH    COLUMBIA 

University  of  Minnesota.  He  also  belongs  to  the  Vancouver  Golf  Club,  the 
Progress  Club,  the  University  Club  and  the  Terminal  City  Club  of  Vancouver, 
and  to  the  Commercial  Club  of  Minneapolis.  He  has  a  wide  acquaintance  in 
leading  cities  on  each  side  of  the  border.  The  characteristic  American  enterprise 
is  manifest  in  all  that  he  undertakes,  and  in  exploiting  the  interests  of  western 
Canada  he  has  not  only  won  substantial  success  for  himself  but  has  also  greatly 
promoted  the  interests  of  this  section  of  the  country. 


THOMAS  EDWARD  ATKINS. 

Thomas  Edward  Atkins,  a  Vancouver  capitalist  whose  name  has  figured 
prominently  in  connection  with  the  drug  trade,  the  lumber  business  and  with  saw- 
milling  and  salmon-packing  industries,  as  well  as  with  extensive  real-estate 
operations,  belongs  to  that  class  of  representative  men  who  in  advancing  indi- 
vidual interests  have  also  contributed  to  public  progress  through  the  utiliza- 
tion of  the  natural  resources  of  the  country  and  through  the  establishment  of 
growing  business  activities.  He  was  born  in  Truro,  Nova  Scotia,  January  24, 
1857,  and  is  a  son  of  John  Milner  and  Mary  (Yuill)  Atkins,  the  former  a  son  of 
Thomas  E.  Atkins,  who  came  to  Canada  from  England,  settling  at  Bytown,  now 
the  city  of  Ottawa,  Ontario,  and  later  removed  to  Quebec,  where  he  was  in  the 
service  of  the  Dominion  government  until  his  death.  His  son,  John  M.  Atkins, 
was  born  in  Bytown  and  was  there  reared  and  educated  untfl  he  accompanied  his 
parents  on  their  removal  to  Quebec.  In  1852,  when  a  young  man,  he  took 
passage  on  a  sailing  vessel  for  Australia,  attracted  by  the  news  of  the  discoverey 
of  gold  in  that  country.  The  vessel  was  wrecked  in  Miramichi  Bay  and  he  barely 
escaped  with  his  life,  losing  all  his  possessions.  Making  his  way  to  New  Bruns- 
wick, he  there  engaged  in  teaching  for  a  time  and  afterward  went  to  Nova 
Scotia,  settling  at  Truro,  where  he  married  and  continued  to  reside  for  a  long 
period.  He  was  engaged  in  mercantile  pursuits  until  1895,  when  he  disposed 
of  his  interests  in  the  east  and  came  to  Vancouver,  where  he  lived  retired  until 
his  death.  His  wife,  who  bore  the  maiden  name  of  Mary  Yuill,  was  descended 
from  ancestors  who  came  from  Fifeshire,  Scotland,  and  settled  in  Nova  Scotia. 
Mrs.  Atkins  accompanied  her  husband  to  British  Columbia  and  her  last  days 
were  also  passed  in  Vancouver. 

Thomas  E.  Atkins  was  educated  in  the  schools  of  Truro,  Nova  Scotia,  and  in 
1870  he  entered  upon  an  apprenticeship  to  his  uncle,  who  was  engaged  in  the 
retail  drug  business  in  Truro.  After  the  completion  of  a  five  years'  apprentice- 
ship he  spent  one  year  in  his  uncle's  employ  and  in  1877  went  to  Montreal, 
where  he  attended  lectures  and  passed  the  necessary  examinations  that  won  him 
his  certificate  to  engage  in  the  drug  business  as  a  registered  pharmacist  in  the 
province  of  Quebec.  This  was  in  1878.  He  afterward  went  to  Halifax,  Nova 
Scotia,  to  manage  the  retail  drug  business  of  Forsythe,  Sutcliffe  &  Company, 
with  whom  he  remained  for  a  year,  when  in  1879  ne  removed  to  Londonderry, 
Nova  Scotia,  and  embarked  in  the  retail  drug  business  on  his  own  account  at 
the  Londonderry  iron  mines.  There  he  remained  for  a  decade,  or  until  1889, 
when  he  sold  his  interests.  During  his  residence  there  he  was  postmaster  for 
seven  years.  In  1889  ne  came  to  Vancouver  and  entered  the  real-estate  business, 
in  which  he  engaged  for  six  months,  after  which  he  established  a  drug  store  on 
Hastings  street,  conducting  it  under  the  name  of  Medical  Hall.  In  the  spring  of 
1892  he  was  joined  by  his  brother,  John  M.  Atkins,  and  they  continued  in  busi- 
ness as  Atkins  &  Atkins  until  1895,  when  they  amalgamated  their  interests  with 
H.  McDowell  and  H.  H.  Watson.  The  new  enterprise  was  incorporated  as  The 
McDowell- Atkins-Watson  Company.  The  business  grew  to  large  proportions  and 
they  operated  a  chain  of  ten  drug  stores  in  Vancouver.  In  1902  this  company 
amalgamated  with  Henderson  Brothers,  wholesale  druggists,  and  continued  the 
wholesale  and  retail  interests,  both  being  carried  on  under  the  same  titles  as 


THOMAS  E.  ATKINS 


BRITISH    COLUMBIA  385 

before  the  amalgamation  until  1907,  when  they  sold  to  the  National  Drug  Com- 
pany. Mr.  Atkins  then  retired  from  the  drug  business  and  has  since  devoted  his 
time  to  the  management  of  his  various  investments.  He  has  been  largely  inter- 
ested in  lumber,  in  sawmilling  and  salmon  packing  industries,  and  has  also 
carried  on  extensive  real-estate  operations.  In  association  with  J.  W.  Weart,  he 
organized  the  Metropolitan  Building  Company,  Ltd.,  which  erected  the  Metro- 
politan building  on  Hastings  street,  West.  This  is  one  of  the  finest  office  build- 
ings in  the  city.  Since  that  time  he  has  been  secretary  of  the  company  and 
practically  manager  of  the  building.  The  business  affairs  which  have  claimed 
the  time  and  energies  of  Mr.  Atkins  have  been  extensive  and  important.  Starting 
out  in  life  in  a  comparatively  humble  way,  he  has  steadily  advanced  and  his  de- 
veloping powers  and  awakened  energies  have  carried  him  into  important  rela- 
tions, so  that  he  is  classed  today  with  Vancouver's  leading  capitalists. 

On  the  24th  of  November,  1880,  in  Londonderry,  Nova  Scotia,  Mr.  Atkins 
was  united  in  marriage  to  Miss  Jennie  C.  Crowe,  a  daughter  of  James  McKinney 
Crowe,  of  Onslow,  Nova  Scotia.  Mr.  Atkins  is  a  thirty-second  degree  Mason 
and  has  been  very  active  in  Masonic  circles.  He  has  passed  through  the  chair  in 
North  Star  Lodge,  No.  74,  A.  F.  &  A.  M.,  Nova  Scotia;  Keith  Chapter, 
R.  A.  M.,  Truro,  Nova  Scotia,  and  Columbia  Preceptory  No.  34,  K.  T.  He  is 
likewise  a  noble  of  the  Mystic  Shrine  and  a  member  of  the  Independent  Order  of 
Foresters.  He  belongs  to  the  Terminal  City  Club,  of  which  he  served  as  presi- 
dent for  three  years,  is  a  conservative  in  politics,  and  attends  St.  Andrew's  Pres- 
byterian church.  In  these  different  affiliations  and  connections  are  to  be  found 
the  principles  and  rules  which  govern  his  conduct.  He  stands  as  a  man  among 
men — capable,  alert,  enterprising  and  progressive,  his  life  history  indicating  what 
can  be  accomplished  when  there  is  a  will  to  dare  and  to  do. 


SYDNEY  RICHMOND  MARGETSON. 

It  is  readily  conceded  that  the  man  who  promotes  real-estate  transactions  influ- 
ences public  growth  in  a  vital  degree,  and,  considered  in  that  light,  Sydney 
Richmond  Margetson  has  done  much  towards  the  upbuilding  of  Vancouver, 
where  he  is  widely  and  favorably  known  as  a  real-estate  dealer  in  connection 
with  the  firm  of  Margetson  Brothers.  Born  in  London,  England,  October  12, 
1877,  he  is  a  son  of  William  Parker  and  Mary  Ann  (Beazley)  Margetson,  both 
natives  of  London.  The  father  emigrated  to  Manitoba,  where  he  made  his  home 
for  three  years,  and  died  in  Milwaukee,  Wisconsin,  in  1904.  The  mother  has 
also  passed  away. 

Sydney  Richmond  Margetson  received  his  education  in  the  public  schools  of 
the  world's  metropolis,  and  in  1895,  when  eighteen  years  of  age,  came  to  Canada 
and  engaged  in  farming  near  the  city  of  Winnipeg.  In  1900  his  patriotic  spirit 
led  him  to  go  to  South  Africa,  where  he  served  for  three  years  in  the  South 
African  Constabulary  as  district  quartermaster  sergeant.  Returning  to  Winni- 
peg in  1904,  he  there  remained  until  coming  to  Vancouver  in  1906.  Upon  his 
arrival  in  this  city  he  entered  the  employ  of  Waghorn,  Gwynn  &  Company,  with 
whom  he  continued  for  four  years.  In  the  fall  of  1910,  with  his  brother,  R.  A. 
P.  Margetson,  he  formed  the  firm  of  Margetson  Brothers,  and  they  engaged  in 
the  real-estate,  loan  and  insurance  business,  operating  in  Vancouver  and  its 
suburbs.  Their  business  efforts  have  been  attended  by  gratifying  success  from 
the  start,  and  their  business  connections  have  ever  since  increased  in  volume  and 
importance.  In  the  same  year  they  organized  The  Strathspey  Land  &  Investment 
Company,  Ltd.,  of  which  our  subject  became  president  and  managing  director. 
It  has  an  authorized  and  fully  paid-up  capital  of  fifty  thousand  dollars  and  a 
reserve  fund  of  six  thousand  dollars.  In  the  three  years  since  its  incorporation 
the  company  has  paid  a  dividend  of  twenty-eight  per  cent,  and  created  a  reserve 
fund  of  twelve  per  cent.,  and  has  carried  forward  four  and  a  half  per  cent., 


386  BRITISH    COLUMBIA 

making  its  total  net  earnings  forty-four  and  a  half  per  cent,  for  that  period. 
They  deal  in  real  estate,  loans  and  mortgages.  The  above  showing  of  their 
splendid  growth  is  largely  due  to  the  accurate  judgment,  sound  business  policy 
and  fair  measures  of  the  two  brothers.  In  March,  1912,  Mr.  Margetson  organ- 
ized the  Seafield  Investment  Company,  Ltd.,  of  which  he  is  also  president  and 
managing  director.  Margetson  Brothers  manage  much  rental-bearing  property, 
and  they  have  introduced  a  great  deal  of  English  capital  into  this  city  and  vicinity. 
They  have  subdivisions  in  Point  Grey,  South  Vancouver  and  North  Vancouver. 

In  March,  1909,  in  Vancouver,  Mr.  Margetson  was  united  in  marriage  to  Miss 
Jean  Frances  Osborne  MacDonald,  a  daughter  of  the  late  Colonel  Allan 
MacDonald,  of  Winnipeg.  They  have  two  children,  Allan  Richmond  and  Enid 
Mary.  Although  never  active  in  political  circles  Mr.  Margetson  is  deeply  inter- 
ested in  the  public  progress  of  his  community.  He  gives  his  adherence  to  the 
conservative  party.  He  is  a  notary  public  for  the  province  of  British  Columbia. 
Among  the  social  organizations  in  which  he  holds  membership  are  the  Canadian, 
Progress  and  British  Columbia  Golf  and  Country  Clubs,  the  latter  connection 
giving  an  indication  as  to  his  preference  in  regard  to  recreation.  His  religion 
is  that  of  the  Church  of  England,  and  he  is  a  member  of  St.  Paul's  church  of 
Vancouver.  Since  making  Vancouver  his  home  he  has  made  rapid  progress  in  the 
right  direction  and  has  been  instrumental  in  bringing  to  life  a  number  of  important 
organizations  which  have  largely  taken  part  in  the  development  of  the  city.  He 
has  therefore  become  a  forceful  element  in  the  community  and  is  highly  respected 
and  esteemed  by  all,  as  it  is  readily  conceded  that  the  public  weal  plays  as  impor- 
tant a  role  in  his  life  as  the  promotion  of  his  private  interests. 


JAMES  ERNEST  SPANKIE,  M.  D. 

This  is  an  age  of  specialization.  Investigation  and  research  have  so 
broadened  the  field  of  knowledge  that  it  is  impossible  for  any  single  individual 
to  become  an  expert  in  all  lines  of  medical  and  surgical  practice,  and  therefore 
after  attaining  the  basic  principles  it  is  usual  for  the  individual  to  concentrate 
his  efforts  upon  one  or  more  lines,  thereby  attaining  marked  proficiency  in 
his  chosen  field.  In  accordance  with  this  custom  Dr.  James  Ernest  Spankie 
has  given  his  attention  more  specially  to  surgery  and  the  diseases  of  women  and 
in  both  displays  notable  skill.  He  has  been  a  resident  of  British  Columbia 
since  1899,  arriving  here  when  a  young  man  of  about  twenty-eight  years.  His 
birth  occurred  at  Kingston,  Ontario,  September  22,  1871,  his  parents  being 
William  and  Margaret  Spankie.  The  father  was  proprietor  of  a  hotel  in 
Kingston,  Ontario,  in  what  was  known  as  the  old  hay  market,  and  it  was  in 
that  hotel  that  the  late  Sir  John  A.  MacDonald  held  his  first  political  meeting. 

After  attending  the  public  schools  of  his  native  city  Dr.  Spankie  entered  the 
Queen's  University  at  Kingston  and  was  graduated  in  1891  with  the  degree  of 
M.  D.,  C.  M.  Following  his  removal  to  the  west  in  1896  he  practiced  for  three 
years  as  assistant  to  Dr.  R.  G.  Brett  at  Banff,  Alberta.  In  1899  ne  went  to 
Greenwood,  British  Columbia,  and  practiced  in  that  mining  camp  for  a  decade. 
In  1909  he  came  to  Vancouver,  where  he  has  since  remained,  and  although 
he  practices  to  some  extent  in  a  general  way,  he  specializes  in  surgery  and 
diseases  of  women  and  his  knowledge  along  those  lines  has  made  him  particularly 
skilful  and  successful.  To  some  extent  he  has  invested  in  Vancouver  realty 
but  otherwise  concentrates  his  energies  upon  his  professional  duties. 

On  the  24th  of  June,  1903,  Dr.  Spankie  was  married  at  Yonkers,  New 
York,  to  Miss  Grace  Isabel  Mulligan,  a  daughter  of  John  and  Isabel  Mulligan. 
The  father  was  a  prominent  lodge  man  of  New  York  city,  being  an  organizer 
of  Masonic  and  other  lodges.  Dr.  and  Mrs.  Spankie  have  a  son,  Donald  F. 

The  Doctor  is  a  conservative  in  politics  but  has  never  been  an  office* 
seeker.  He  holds  membership  in  Melrose  Lodge,  A.  F.  &  A.  M.,  of  Vancouver, 


DR.  JAMES  E.  1SPANKIE 


BRITISH  COLUMBIA  389 

the  Independent  Order  of  Odd  Fellows,  the  Knights  of  Pythias,  the  Fraternal 
Order  of  Eagles  and  the  Canadian  Order  of  Chosen  Friends  at  Kingston, 
Ontario.  He  is  likewise  a  member  of  the  University  Club  of  Vancouver. 
He  is  a  man  of  broad  general  information,  well'  informed  concerning  all  the 
vital  and  significant  questions  of  the  day,  and  he  is  a  worthy  addition  to  the 
citizenship  as  well  as  to  the  professional  circles  of  the  northwest. 


FRANK  LLEWELLYN  GWILLIM. 

Prominent  among  the  barristers  of  Vancouver  is  Frank  Llewellyn  Gwillim, 
practicing  in  this  city  as  a  member  of  the  firm  of  Gwillim,  Crisp  &  Mackay. 
Mr.  Gwillim  is  a  native  of  England,  born  in  Herefordshire,  July  6,  1870,  a  son  of 
James  and  Olivia  Maria  (Spencer)  Gwillim,  and  a  representative  of  an  old 
English  family.  He  began  his  education  in  the  public  and  private  schools  of  his 
native  country,  and  in  1882  came  to  Canada,  locating  in  Manitoba,  where  he 
completed  his  studies  in  the  public  schools.  Having  determined  to  make  the 
practice  of  law  his  life  work,  he  was  in  1890  articled  to  William  White,  K.  C., 
now  living  retired  in  London,  England.  Three  years  later  he  was  called  to  the 
bar  of  the  Northwest  Territories,  and  in  1897  was  made  a  member  of  the  Mani- 
toba bar.  In  the  same  year  he  came  to  the  Kootenay  district,  British  Columbia, 
and  was  admitted  to  the  bar  there  as  solicitor,  going  in  the  following  year  to  the 
Yukon  district,  where  he  resumed  the  practice  of  his  profession,  forming  a 
partnership  with  Frederick  George  Crisp  under  the  firm  name  of  Gwillim  &  Crisp, 
Mr.  Gwillim  having  the  distinction  of  being  the  first  public  administrator  in  the 
Yukon  territory.  Mr.  G